Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 95
Filter
1.
Respir Care ; 67(4): 471-479, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766057

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Awake prone positioning (APP) has been recently proposed as an adjunctive treatment for non-intubated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients requiring oxygen therapy to improve oxygenation and reduce the risk of intubation. However, the magnitude of the effect of APP on clinical outcomes in these patients remains uncertain. We performed a comparative systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of APP to improve the clinical outcomes in non-intubated subjects with COVID-19. METHODS: The primary outcomes were the need for endotracheal intubation and mortality. The secondary outcome was hospital length of stay. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and mean difference with the corresponding 95% CI were obtained by the Mantel-Haenszel method within a random-effect model. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies (5 randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and 9 observational studies) involving 3,324 subjects (1,495 received APP and 1,829 did not) were included. There was a significant reduction in the mortality rate in APP group compared to control (RR 0.68 [95% CI 0.51-0.90]; P = .008, I2 = 52%) with no significant effect on intubation (RR 0.85 [95% CI 0.66-1.08]; P = .17, I2 = 63%) or hospital length of stay (mean difference -3.09 d [95% CI-10.14-3.96]; P = .39, I2 = 97%). Subgroup analysis of RCTs showed significant reduction in intubation rate (RR 0.83 [95% CI 0.72-0.97]; P = .02, I2 = 0%). CONCLUSIONS: APP has the potential to reduce the in-hospital mortality rate in COVID-19 subjects with hypoxemia without a significant effect on the need for intubation or length of hospital stay. However, there was a significant decrease in the need for intubation on subgroup analysis of RCTs. More large-scale trials with a standardized protocol for prone positioning are needed to better evaluate its effectiveness in this select population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position
2.
Lancet Respir Med ; 10(6): 573-583, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740330

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Awake prone positioning has been broadly utilised for non-intubated patients with COVID-19-related acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure, but the results from published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the past year are contradictory. We aimed to systematically synthesise the outcomes associated with awake prone positioning, and evaluate these outcomes in relevant subpopulations. METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, two independent groups of researchers searched MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, MedRxiv, BioRxiv, and ClinicalTrials.gov for RCTs and observational studies (with a control group) of awake prone positioning in patients with COVID-19-related acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure published in English from Jan 1, 2020, to Nov 8, 2021. We excluded trials that included patients intubated before or at enrolment, paediatric patients (ie, younger than 18 years), or trials that did not include the supine position in the control group. The same two independent groups screened studies, extracted the summary data from published reports, and assessed the risk of bias. We used a random-effects meta-analysis to pool individual studies. We used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to assess the certainty and quality of the evidence. The primary outcome was the reported cumulative intubation risk across RCTs, and effect estimates were calculated as risk ratios (RR;95% CI). The analysis was primarily conducted on RCTs, and observational studies were used for sensitivity analyses. No serious adverse events associated with awake prone positioning were reported. The study protocol was prospectively registered with PROSPERO, CRD42021271285. FINDINGS: A total of 1243 studies were identified, we assessed 138 full-text articles and received the aggregated results of three unpublished RCTs; therefore, after exclusions, 29 studies were included in the study. Ten were RCTs (1985 patients) and 19 were observational studies (2669 patients). In ten RCTs, awake prone positioning compared with the supine position significantly reduced the need for intubation in the overall population (RR 0·84 [95% CI 0·72-0·97]). A reduced need for intubation was shown among patients who received advanced respiratory support (ie, high-flow nasal cannula or non-invasive ventilation) at enrolment (RR 0·83 [0·71-0·97]) and in intensive care unit (ICU) settings (RR 0·83 [0·71-0·97]) but not in patients receiving conventional oxygen therapy (RR 0·87 [0·45-1·69]) or in non-ICU settings (RR 0·88 [0·44-1·76]). No obvious risk of bias and publication bias was found among the included RCTs for the primary outcome. INTERPRETATION: In patients with COVID-19-related acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure, awake prone positioning reduced the need for intubation, particularly among those requiring advanced respiratory support and those in ICU settings. Awake prone positioning should be used in patients who have acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure due to COVID-19 and require advanced respiratory support or are treated in the ICU. FUNDING: OpenAI, Rice Foundation, National Institute for Health Research, and Oxford Biomedical Research Centre.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Wakefulness
4.
Crit Care Med ; 50(2): 275-285, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691783

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study investigated the impact of prone positioning during venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory failure on the patient outcome. DESIGN: An observational study of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients. We used a multistate survival model to compare the outcomes of patients treated with or without prone positioning during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, which incorporates the dynamic nature of prone positioning and adjusts for potential confounders. SETTING: Seventy-two international institutions participating in the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Critical Care Consortium international registry. PATIENTS: Coronavirus disease 2019 patients who were supported by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during the study period. INTERVENTION: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There were 232 coronavirus disease 2019 patients at 72 participating institutions who were supported with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during the study period from February 16, 2020, to October 31, 2020. Proning was used in 176 patients (76%) before initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and in 67 patients (29%) during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Survival to hospital discharge was 33% in the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prone group versus 22% in the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supine group. Prone positioning during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was associated with reduced mortality (hazard ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.14-0.68). CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights that prone positioning during venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for refractory coronavirus disease 2019-related acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with reduced mortality. Given the observational nature of the study, a randomized controlled trial of prone positioning on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is needed to confirm these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Probability , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology
5.
Br J Anaesth ; 128(2): 352-362, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prone positioning in non-intubated spontaneously breathing patients is becoming widely applied in practice alongside noninvasive respiratory support. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the effect, timing, and populations that might benefit from awake proning regarding oxygenation, mortality, and tracheal intubation compared with supine position in hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, CINAHL, and BMJ Best Practice until August 2021 (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews [PROSPERO] registration: CRD42021250322). Studies included comprise least-wise 20 adult patients with hypoxaemic respiratory failure secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome or coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed, and study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. RESULTS: Fourteen studies fulfilled the selection criteria and 2352 patients were included; of those patients, 99% (n=2332/2352) had COVID-19. Amongst 1041 (44%) patients who were placed in the prone position, 1021 were SARS-CoV-2 positive. The meta-analysis revealed significant improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio (mean difference -23.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -34.80 to 11.39; P=0.0001; I2=26%) after prone positioning. In patients with COVID-19, lower mortality was found in the group placed in the prone position (150/771 prone vs 391/1457 supine; odds ratio [OR] 0.51; 95% CI: 0.32-0.80; P=0.003; I2=48%), but the tracheal intubation rate was unchanged (284/824 prone vs 616/1271 supine; OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.43-1.22; P=0.220; I2=75%). Overall proning was tolerated for a median of 4 h (inter-quartile range: 2-16). CONCLUSIONS: Prone positioning can improve oxygenation amongst non-intubated patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure when applied for at least 4 h over repeated daily episodes. Awake proning appears safe, but the effect on tracheal intubation rate and survival remains uncertain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position/physiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Wakefulness/physiology , Humans
6.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 21(1): 280, 2021 11 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515436

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 can induce acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In patients with congenital heart disease, established treatment strategies are often limited due to their unique cardiovascular anatomy and passive pulmonary perfusion. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the first case of an adult with single-ventricle physiology and bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt who suffered from severe COVID-19 ARDS. Treatment strategies were successfully adopted, and pulmonary vascular resistance was reduced, both medically and through prone positioning, leading to a favorable outcome. CONCLUSION: ARDS treatment strategies including ventilatory settings, prone positioning therapy and cannulation techniques for extracorporeal oxygenation must be adopted carefully considering the passive venous return in patients with single-ventricle physiology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cardiomegaly/diagnostic imaging , Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures/methods , Dextrocardia/diagnostic imaging , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/diagnostic imaging , Heterotaxy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Patient Positioning/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiomegaly/complications , Cardiomegaly/therapy , Dextrocardia/complications , Dextrocardia/therapy , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/complications , Genetic Diseases, X-Linked/therapy , Heterotaxy Syndrome/complications , Heterotaxy Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Respir Care ; 67(4): 471-479, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Awake prone positioning (APP) has been recently proposed as an adjunctive treatment for non-intubated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients requiring oxygen therapy to improve oxygenation and reduce the risk of intubation. However, the magnitude of the effect of APP on clinical outcomes in these patients remains uncertain. We performed a comparative systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of APP to improve the clinical outcomes in non-intubated subjects with COVID-19. METHODS: The primary outcomes were the need for endotracheal intubation and mortality. The secondary outcome was hospital length of stay. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and mean difference with the corresponding 95% CI were obtained by the Mantel-Haenszel method within a random-effect model. RESULTS: A total of 14 studies (5 randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and 9 observational studies) involving 3,324 subjects (1,495 received APP and 1,829 did not) were included. There was a significant reduction in the mortality rate in APP group compared to control (RR 0.68 [95% CI 0.51-0.90]; P = .008, I2 = 52%) with no significant effect on intubation (RR 0.85 [95% CI 0.66-1.08]; P = .17, I2 = 63%) or hospital length of stay (mean difference -3.09 d [95% CI-10.14-3.96]; P = .39, I2 = 97%). Subgroup analysis of RCTs showed significant reduction in intubation rate (RR 0.83 [95% CI 0.72-0.97]; P = .02, I2 = 0%). CONCLUSIONS: APP has the potential to reduce the in-hospital mortality rate in COVID-19 subjects with hypoxemia without a significant effect on the need for intubation or length of hospital stay. However, there was a significant decrease in the need for intubation on subgroup analysis of RCTs. More large-scale trials with a standardized protocol for prone positioning are needed to better evaluate its effectiveness in this select population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position
8.
J Tissue Viability ; 30(4): 466-477, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ventilating critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome in the prone position is a life-saving strategy, but it is associated with adverse consequences such as skin damage. AIM: To identify, review and evaluate international proning and skin care guidelines and make an inventory of commonly used equipment and training resources. DESIGN: A gap analysis methodology was applied. METHODS: 1) Comprehensive search and evaluation of proning and skin care guidelines, 2) extensive search and listing equipment and educational resources, and 3) international consultation with 11 experts (8 countries). DATA SOURCES: A variety of sources researched through July 2021 were used to identify relevant literature: (1) scientific literature databases and clinical trials registries, (2) intensive care and wound care associations, (3) healthcare organisations, (4) guideline development organisations, and (5) the Google search engine. Eleven international experts reviewed the literature and provided insights in two, 2-h online sessions. FINDINGS: The search yielded 24 guidelines. One clinical practice guideline had high methodological quality. Twenty-five devices/equipment and sixteen teaching materials were identified and discussed with the expert panel. The gap analysis identified a lack of concise, accessible, evidence-based guidelines and educational materials of short duration. CONCLUSION: This analysis forms the basis for designing a competency-based education and training intervention for an interdisciplinary team caring for the skin of critically ill patients in the prone position. IMPACT: The results can assist the multidisciplinary team to review their current protocol for prone positioning. This is a first step in developing a training package for clinicians.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness/therapy , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy
9.
Nursing ; 51(7): 44-47, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393335

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prone positioning is a recommended therapy for patients with COVID-19 who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. This article describes the creation, operation, and evolution of the pronation therapy team at the author's Veterans Affairs facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Veterans/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
10.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 315, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383659

ABSTRACT

This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2021. Other selected articles can be found online at  https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2021 . Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from  https://link.springer.com/bookseries/8901 .


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/adverse effects , Patient Positioning/standards , Prone Position/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Survival Analysis
14.
J Healthc Qual ; 43(4): 195-203, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284913

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused over 1,250,000 deaths worldwide. With limited therapeutic options, proning nonintubated patients emerged as a safe and affordable intervention to manage hypoxemia. METHODS: A proning protocol to identify and prone eligible patients was implemented. Patients were encouraged to self-prone for 2-3 hours, 3 times daily. Investigators created educational materials for nurses and patients and developed a COVID-19-specific proning order within the electronic health record (EHR). Investigators completed an 800-person retrospective chart review to study the implementation of this protocol. RESULTS: From March 22, 2020, to June 5, 2020, 586 patients were admitted to the COVID-19 floor. Of these patients, 42.8% were eligible for proning. Common contraindications were lack of hypoxia, altered mental status, and fall risk. The proning protocol led to a significant improvement in provider awareness of patients appropriate for proning, increasing from 12% to 83%, as measured by placement of a proning order into the EHR. There was a significant improvement in all appropriate patients documented as proned, increasing from 18% to 45% of eligible patients. CONCLUSIONS: The creation of an effective hospital-wide proning protocol to address the exigencies of the COVID-19 pandemic is possible and may be accomplished in a short period of time.


Subject(s)
Hypoxia/therapy , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Nursing ; 51(7): 44-47, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280142

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prone positioning is a recommended therapy for patients with COVID-19 who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. This article describes the creation, operation, and evolution of the pronation therapy team at the author's Veterans Affairs facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Veterans/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
16.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 209, 2021 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269884

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of awake prone positioning on intubation rates is not established. The aim of this trial was to investigate if a protocol for awake prone positioning reduces the rate of endotracheal intubation compared with standard care among patients with moderate to severe hypoxemic respiratory failure due to COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter randomized clinical trial. Adult patients with confirmed COVID-19, high-flow nasal oxygen or noninvasive ventilation for respiratory support and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤ 20 kPa were randomly assigned to a protocol targeting 16 h prone positioning per day or standard care. The primary endpoint was intubation within 30 days. Secondary endpoints included duration of awake prone positioning, 30-day mortality, ventilator-free days, hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, use of noninvasive ventilation, organ support and adverse events. The trial was terminated early due to futility. RESULTS: Of 141 patients assessed for eligibility, 75 were randomized of whom 39 were allocated to the control group and 36 to the prone group. Within 30 days after enrollment, 13 patients (33%) were intubated in the control group versus 12 patients (33%) in the prone group (HR 1.01 (95% CI 0.46-2.21), P = 0.99). Median prone duration was 3.4 h [IQR 1.8-8.4] in the control group compared with 9.0 h per day [IQR 4.4-10.6] in the prone group (P = 0.014). Nine patients (23%) in the control group had pressure sores compared with two patients (6%) in the prone group (difference - 18% (95% CI - 2 to - 33%); P = 0.032). There were no other differences in secondary outcomes between groups. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented protocol for awake prone positioning increased duration of prone positioning, but did not reduce the rate of intubation in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure due to COVID-19 compared to standard care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN54917435. Registered 15 June 2020 ( https://doi.org/10.1186/ISRCTN54917435 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Patient Positioning/methods , Prone Position , Respiratory Insufficiency/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Wakefulness
18.
Korean J Anesthesiol ; 74(4): 285-292, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211980

ABSTRACT

This narrative review evaluates the evidence for using neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) in patients being treated for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). While large prospective randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) are lacking at this point in time, smaller observational studies and case series are reviewed to ascertain the indications and utility of NMBAs. Additionally, large RCTs that address similar clinical scenarios are reviewed and the authors translate these findings to patients with COVID-19. Specifically, NMBAs can be helpful during endotracheal intubation to minimize the risk of patient coughing and possibly infecting healthcare personnel. NMBAs can also be used in patients to promote patient-ventilator synchrony while reducing the driving pressure needed with mechanical ventilation (MV), particularly in patients with the severe clinical presentation (Type H phenotype). Prone positioning has also become a cornerstone in managing refractory hypoxemia in patients with SARS-CoV-2 acute respiratory distress syndrome, and NMBAs can be useful in facilitating this maneuver. In the perioperative setting, deep levels of neuromuscular blockade can improve patient outcomes during laparoscopic operations and may theoretically reduce the risk of aerosolization as lower insufflation pressures may be utilized. Regardless of the indication, quantitative neuromuscular monitoring remains the only reliable method to confirm adequate recovery following cessation of neuromuscular blockade. Such monitors may serve a unique purpose in patients with COVID-19 as automation of measurements can reduce healthcare personnel-patient contact that would occur during periodic subjective evaluation with a peripheral nerve stimulator.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Neuromuscular Blockade/methods , Neuromuscular Blocking Agents/administration & dosage , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 133, 2021 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Among the challenges for personalizing the management of mechanically ventilated patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the effects of different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels and body positions in regional lung mechanics. Right-left lung aeration asymmetry and poorly recruitable lungs with increased recruitability with alternating body position between supine and prone have been reported. However, real-time effects of changing body position and PEEP on regional overdistension and collapse, in individual patients, remain largely unknown and not timely monitored. The aim of this study was to individualize PEEP and body positioning in order to reduce the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury: collapse and overdistension. METHODS: We here report a series of five consecutive mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS in which sixteen decremental PEEP titrations were performed in the first days of mechanical ventilation (8 titration pairs: supine position immediately followed by 30° targeted lateral position). The choice of lateral tilt was based on X-Ray. This targeted lateral position strategy was defined by selecting the less aerated lung to be positioned up and the more aerated lung to be positioned down. For each PEEP level, global and regional collapse and overdistension maps and percentages were measured by electrical impedance tomography. Additionally, we present the incidence of lateral asymmetry in a cohort of forty-four patients. RESULTS: The targeted lateral position strategy resulted in significantly smaller amounts of overdistension and collapse when compared with the supine one: less collapse along the PEEP titration was found within the left lung in targeted lateral (P = 0.014); and less overdistension along the PEEP titration was found within the right lung in targeted lateral (P = 0.005). Regarding collapse within the right lung and overdistension within the left lung: no differences were found for position. In the cohort of forty-four patients, ventilation inequality of > 65/35% was observed in 15% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Targeted lateral positioning with bedside personalized PEEP provided a selective attenuation of overdistension and collapse in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS and right-left lung aeration/ventilation asymmetry. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial registration number: NCT04460859.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Patient Positioning/methods , Pulmonary Atelectasis/prevention & control , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Electric Impedance , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Positive-Pressure Respiration/methods , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Atelectasis/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Emerg Nurs ; 47(2): 279-287.e1, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195353

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In March and April 2020 of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, site clinical practice guidelines were implemented for prone positioning of patients with suspected coronavirus disease 2019 in hypoxic respiratory distress who are awake, alert, and spontaneously breathing. The purpose of this pandemic disaster practice improvement project was to measure changes in pulse oximetry associated with prone positioning of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 infection in adult acute respiratory distress or adult respiratory distress syndrome, who are awake, alert, spontaneously breathing, and nonintubated. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients who were coronavirus disease 2019 positive in the emergency department from March 30, 2020 to April 30, 2020 was conducted for patients with a room air pulse oximetry <90% and a preprone position pulse oximetry ≤94% who tolerated prone positioning for at least 30 minutes. The primary outcome was the change in pulse oximetry associated with prone positioning, measured on room air, with supplemental oxygen, and approximately 30 minutes after initiating prone positioning. Median and mean differences were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired t-test. RESULTS: Of the 440 patients with coronavirus disease 2019, 31 met inclusion criteria. Median pulse oximetry increased as 83% (interquartile range, 75%-86%) on room air, 90% (interquartile range, 89%-93%) with supplemental oxygen, and 96% (interquartile range, 94%-98%) with prone positioning (z = -4.48, P < .001). A total of 45% (n = 14) were intubated during their hospital stay, and 26% (n = 8) of the included patients died. DISCUSSION: In patients with coronavirus disease 2019 who are awake, alert, and spontaneously breathing, an initially low pulse oximetry reading improved with prone positioning. Future studies are needed to determine the association of prone positioning with subsequent endotracheal intubation and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/therapy , Intubation, Intratracheal , Male , Medical Records , Middle Aged , New Jersey , Oximetry , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL