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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2141233, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596574

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of alternative care modalities (eg, teleconsultations and task shifting) that will continue to be implemented in parallel to traditional care after the pandemic. An ideal balance between alternative and traditional care modalities is unknown. Objectives: To quantify the ideal postpandemic balance between alternative and traditional care modalities among patients with chronic illness and to qualify the circumstances in which patients consider it appropriate to replace traditional care with alternative care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study invited 5999 adults with chronic illness in ComPaRe, a French nationwide e-cohort of adults with chronic conditions who volunteer their time to participate in research projects, to participate in this study, which was performed from January 27 to February 23, 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: Participants rated the ideal proportion at which they would use 3 alternative care modalities instead of the traditional care equivalent on a 0% to 100% scale (with 0% indicating using alternative care modalities for none of one's future care and 100% indicating using alternative care modalities for all of one's future care) of their overall future care: (1) teleconsultations, (2) online symptom-checkers to react to new symptoms, and (3) remote monitoring to adapt treatment outside consultations. The median ideal proportion of alternative care use was calculated. Perceived appropriate circumstances in which each alternative modality could replace traditional care were collected with open-ended questions. Analyses were performed on a weighted data set representative of patients with chronic illness in France. Results: Of the 5999 invited individuals, 1529 (mean [SD] age, 50.3 [14.7] years; 1072 [70.1%] female) agreed to participate (participation rate, 25.5%). Participants would choose teleconsultations for 50.0% of their future consultations (IQR, 11.0%-52.0%), online symptom-checkers over contacting their physician for 22.0% of new symptoms (IQR, 2.0%-50.0%), and remote monitoring instead of consultations for 52.3% of their treatment adaptations (IQR, 25.4%-85.4%). Participants reported 67 circumstances for which replacing traditional with alternative care modalities was considered appropriate, including 31 care activities (eg, prescription renewal and addressing acute or minor complaints), 25 patient characteristics (eg, stable chronic condition and established patient-physician relationship), and 11 required characteristics of the alternative care modalities (eg, quality assurance). Conclusions and Relevance: Results of this survey study suggest that after the pandemic, patients would choose alternative over traditional care for 22% to 52% of the time across different care needs. Participants proposed 67 criteria to guide clinicians in replacing traditional care with alternative care. These findings provide a guide for redesigning care in collaboration with patients after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Disease/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Preference , Adult , Female , France , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e22841, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Misdiagnosis, arbitrary charges, annoying queues, and clinic waiting times among others are long-standing phenomena in the medical industry across the world. These factors can contribute to patient anxiety about misdiagnosis by clinicians. However, with the increasing growth in use of big data in biomedical and health care communities, the performance of artificial intelligence (Al) techniques of diagnosis is improving and can help avoid medical practice errors, including under the current circumstance of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to visualize and measure patients' heterogeneous preferences from various angles of AI diagnosis versus clinicians in the context of the COVID-19 epidemic in China. We also aim to illustrate the different decision-making factors of the latent class of a discrete choice experiment (DCE) and prospects for the application of AI techniques in judgment and management during the pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 and in the future. METHODS: A DCE approach was the main analysis method applied in this paper. Attributes from different dimensions were hypothesized: diagnostic method, outpatient waiting time, diagnosis time, accuracy, follow-up after diagnosis, and diagnostic expense. After that, a questionnaire is formed. With collected data from the DCE questionnaire, we apply Sawtooth software to construct a generalized multinomial logit (GMNL) model, mixed logit model, and latent class model with the data sets. Moreover, we calculate the variables' coefficients, standard error, P value, and odds ratio (OR) and form a utility report to present the importance and weighted percentage of attributes. RESULTS: A total of 55.8% of the respondents (428 out of 767) opted for AI diagnosis regardless of the description of the clinicians. In the GMNL model, we found that people prefer the 100% accuracy level the most (OR 4.548, 95% CI 4.048-5.110, P<.001). For the latent class model, the most acceptable model consists of 3 latent classes of respondents. The attributes with the most substantial effects and highest percentage weights are the accuracy (39.29% in general) and expense of diagnosis (21.69% in general), especially the preferences for the diagnosis "accuracy" attribute, which is constant across classes. For class 1 and class 3, people prefer the AI + clinicians method (class 1: OR 1.247, 95% CI 1.036-1.463, P<.001; class 3: OR 1.958, 95% CI 1.769-2.167, P<.001). For class 2, people prefer the AI method (OR 1.546, 95% CI 0.883-2.707, P=.37). The OR of levels of attributes increases with the increase of accuracy across all classes. CONCLUSIONS: Latent class analysis was prominent and useful in quantifying preferences for attributes of diagnosis choice. People's preferences for the "accuracy" and "diagnostic expenses" attributes are palpable. AI will have a potential market. However, accuracy and diagnosis expenses need to be taken into consideration.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Diagnosis , Patient Preference , Physicians , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , China , Choice Behavior , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/economics , Female , Health Expenditures , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Young Adult
4.
J Huntingtons Dis ; 10(4): 479-484, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the need for remote healthcare options among patients with Huntington's disease (HD). However, since not every HD patient is suitable for telehealth, it is important to differentiate who can be seen virtually from who should remain as in-person. Unfortunately, there are no clinical guidelines on how to evaluate HD patients for telehealth eligibility. OBJECTIVE: To standardize the teleneurology selection process in HD by implementing a screening tool that accounts for patient-specific factors. METHODS: We organized various indications and contraindications to teleneurology into a flowchart. If any indications or contraindications were met, patients were assigned to telehealth or maintained as in-person, respectively. If no indications or contraindications were met, patients were given the option of telehealth or in-person for their upcoming appointments. In two implementation cycles, we tested this screening tool among all HD patients scheduled for clinic visits, aided by chart review and phone interview. RESULTS: In a cohort of 81 patients, telehealth acceptance among eligible patients increased from 45.0%to 83.3%. Frequency of telehealth visits increased from a pre-intervention baseline of 12.8%to 28.2%. CONCLUSION: Teleneurology utilization among HD patients more than doubled across our study. Our intervention promotes consistency and patient-centeredness in HD clinical care and streamlines the overall telehealth selection process. Future studies can seek to reduce telehealth no-shows and also evaluate the utility of the motor and psychiatric criteria included in our screening tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Huntington Disease/therapy , Neurology/standards , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Preference , Telemedicine/standards , Adult , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neurology/organization & administration , Software Design , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers
5.
Int J Med Inform ; 156: 104616, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed outpatient clinical practice, which has led to the need defining digital healthcare modalities to provide telehealth services. The aim of our study was to explore opinions about HIV management via telehealth in a representative, southern central Italian cohort of individuals with HIV (PLWH) and doctors involved in the treatment process. METHODS: We enrolled 80 PLWH who have never used telehealth tools and 60 doctors, who administered an anonymous self-report questionnaire to investigate their opinions about telehealth service use. RESULTS: Most of the doctors and patients indicated that they would use telehealth services; however, 88.3% of the doctors and 40% of the PLWH did not want to substitute personal visits with telehealth services. Unlike PLWH, physicians seemed to agree with most of the possible risks of telehealth, such as patients' isolation from the hospital system (71.7%), interaction difficulty (46.7%) and lower quality of patient assessment (63.3%). The doctors focused on the qualitative aspects of telehealth services reducing patients' exposure to stigma (61.7%), improving quality of patient care (41.7%), and improving privacy (58.3%). By contrast, patients focused on the quantitative aspects of telehealth services improving timely access to care (44%), time saving (63%) and improving interaction with doctor (43%). CONCLUSIONS: Both PLWH (especially older patients and those with longer experience of disease management) and doctors welcome the use of telehealth services but disagree using it to substitute medical consultation in person focusing on different possible benefits and risks of telehealth depending on the needs expressed. Thus, our results suggest the need to initiate and expand communication about telehealth between doctors and patients.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Patient Preference , Physicians , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/therapy , Humans , Italy , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'
6.
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs ; 18(5): 244-246, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434853

ABSTRACT

Health information and communication fall within patient preferences in evidence-based practice. Now more than ever, patients and families in the community have free access to "evidence" and healthcare information on the internet. However, is that information trustworthy, and how can we encourage people to use evidence to promote their optimal health and wellness? The recent rise of global spread of mis- and disinformation through social media outlets has affected public health. There is growing recognition that social media platforms provide magnified podiums leading to unfortunate outcomes. While much work has been done during the COVID-19 pandemic to address health misinformation, there is still much more work to do. We must respond to the widespread misinformation as a collective healthcare community to prevent poor healthcare decisions. Urging the public to be alert to information spread, assess the quality of health information (and whether it is evidence-based), and use shared decision-making tools is a path we can travel together.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Communication , Evidence-Based Practice/organization & administration , Evidence-Based Practice/statistics & numerical data , Health Promotion/methods , Patient Preference/psychology , Social Media , Decision Making , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Ir J Med Sci ; 190(3): 919-923, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384594

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of acquiring perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection is concerning for surgeons and patients. AIMS: In this study, we investigate the incidence of postponed, medically necessary, time-sensitive urological procedures due to a patient's unwillingness to proceed to a recommended surgical intervention during the first phase of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. METHODS: We prospectively monitored all patients undergoing elective urological surgery during the initial phase of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The primary outcome measurement was incidence of postponed, medically necessary, urological procedures due to the patient's decision not to proceed to a recommended urological intervention (16th of March-5th of June 2020). The secondary outcome measurements were the type of delayed procedure and duration of postponement. RESULTS: During the initial 12-week period of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, 155 elective urgent urological procedures were scheduled after pre-operative SARS-CoV-2 screening. In total, 140 procedures were performed and 15 (10%) patients intentionally delayed their urological procedure due to the perceived risk of acquiring nosocomial perioperative SARS-CoV-2 infection. The duration for procedural delays is currently 42 ± 23 (range: 15-80) days. The most frequently postponed procedures among patients unwilling to proceed to surgery are urgent endourological procedures due to symptomatic urolithiasis (n = 7/15). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence for patients postponing urological procedures due to the risk of acquiring nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 is 10%. Endourological procedures for urolithiasis are the most frequently postponed procedures by patients. This study demonstrates that a subset of patients will decline urgent urological surgery during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Pandemics , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Humans , Incidence , Patient Preference , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
9.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e052012, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356949

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common cause of progressive neurological disability in young adults. The use of advance care planning (ACP) for people with progressive MS (pwPMS) remains limited. The ConCure-SM project aims to assess the effectiveness of a structured ACP intervention for pwPMS. The intervention consists of a training programme on ACP for healthcare professionals caring for pwPMS, and a booklet to be used during the ACP conversation. Herein, we describe the first two project phases. METHODS: In phase 1 we translated and adapted, to the Italian legislation and MS context, the ACP booklet of the National ACP Programme for New Zealand. Acceptability, comprehensibility and usefulness of the booklet were assessed via 13 personal cognitive interviews with pwPMS and significant others (SOs), and one health professional focus group. Based on these findings, we will revise the booklet. In phase 2 we will conduct a single-arm pilot/feasibility trial with nested qualitative study. Participants will be 40 pwPMS, their SOs, health professionals from six MS and rehabilitation centres in Italy. In the 6 months following the ACP conversation, we will assess completion of an advance care plan document (primary outcome), as well as safety of the intervention. Secondary outcomes will be a range of measures to capture the full process of ACP; patient-carer congruence in treatment preferences; quality of patient-clinician communication and caregiver burden. A qualitative process evaluation will help understand the factors likely to influence future implementation and scalability of the intervention. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The project is coleaded by a neurologist and a bioethicist. Phase 1 has received ethical approvals from each participating centre, while phase 2 will be submitted to the centres in May 2021. Findings from both phases will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and workshops. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN48527663; Pre-results.


Subject(s)
Advance Care Planning , Multiple Sclerosis , Communication , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Patient Preference , Young Adult
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2119355, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355857

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although people receiving maintenance dialysis have limited life expectancy and a high burden of comorbidity, relatively few studies have examined spirituality and religious beliefs among members of this population. Objective: To examine whether there is an association between the importance of religious or spiritual beliefs and care preferences and palliative care needs in people who receive dialysis. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among adults who were undergoing maintenance dialysis at 31 facilities in Seattle, Washington, and Nashville, Tennessee, between April 22, 2015, and October 2, 2018. The survey included a series of questions assessing patients' knowledge, preferences, values, and expectations related to end-of-life care. Data were analyzed from February 12, 2020, to April 21, 2021. Exposures: The importance of religious or spiritual beliefs was ascertained by asking participants to respond to this statement: "My religious or spiritual beliefs are what really lie behind my whole approach to life." Response options were definitely true, tends to be true, tends not to be true, or definitely not true. Main Outcomes and Measurements: Outcome measures were based on self-reported engagement in advance care planning, resuscitation preferences, values regarding life prolongation, preferred place of death, decision-making preference, thoughts or discussion about hospice or stopping dialysis, prognostic expectations, and palliative care needs. Results: A total of 937 participants were included in the cohort, of whom the mean (SD) age was 62.8 (13.8) years and 524 (55.9%) were men. Overall, 435 (46.4%) participants rated the statement about religious or spiritual beliefs as definitely true, 230 (24.6%) rated it as tends to be true, 137 (14.6%) rated it as tends not to be true, and 135 (14.4%) rated it as definitely not true. Participants for whom these beliefs were more important were more likely to prefer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (estimated probability for definitely true: 69.8% [95% CI, 66.5%-73.2%]; tends to be true: 60.8% [95% CI, 53.4%-68.3%]; tends not to be true: 61.6% [95% CI, 53.6%-69.6%]; and definitely not true: 60.6% [95% CI, 52.5%-68.6%]; P for trend = .003) and mechanical ventilation (estimated probability for definitely true: 42.6% [95% CI, 38.1%-47.0%]; tends to be true: 33.5% [95% CI, 25.9%-41.2%]; tends not to be true: 35.1% [95% CI, 27.2%-42.9%]; and definitely not true: 27.9% [95% CI, 19.6%-36.1%]; P for trend = .002) and to prefer a shared role in decision-making (estimated probability for definitely true: 41.6% [95% CI, 37.7%-45.5%]; tends to be true: 35.4% [95% CI, 29.0%-41.8%]; tends not to be true: 36.0% [95% CI, 26.7%-45.2%]; and definitely not true: 23.8% [95% CI, 17.3%-30.3%]; P for trend = .001) and were less likely to have thought or spoken about stopping dialysis. These participants were no less likely to have engaged in advance care planning, to value relief of pain and discomfort, to prefer to die at home, to have ever thought or spoken about hospice, and to have unmet palliative care needs and had similar prognostic expectations. Conclusions and Relevance: The finding that religious or spiritual beliefs were important to most study participants suggests the value of an integrative approach that addresses these beliefs in caring for people who receive dialysis.


Subject(s)
Patient Preference , Renal Dialysis , Self Report , Terminal Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Religion , Spirituality , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tennessee , Washington
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254756, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341499

ABSTRACT

In the midst of a global pandemic, prevention methods stand as a crucial first step toward addressing the public health crisis and controlling the spread of the virus. However, slowing the spread of the virus hinges on the public's willingness to follow a combination of mitigation practices to avoid contracting and transmitting the disease. In this study, we investigate the factors related to individuals' risk perceptions associated with COVID-19 as well as their general self-assessed risk preferences. We also provide insights regarding the role of risk perceptions and preferences on mitigation behavior by examining the correlation between these risk measures and both the likelihood of following various mitigation practices and total number of practices followed. Although we find both risk perceptions and preferences to be significantly correlated with mitigation behaviors, risk perceptions are correlated with a larger number of practices. Additionally, we find significant heterogeneity in mitigation behaviors across numerous individual and household characteristics. These results can serve as a benchmark for the design and development of interventions to increase awareness and promote higher adoption of mitigation practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Behavior/physiology , Patient Preference , Perception/physiology , Self-Assessment , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Preference/psychology , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Orthopedics ; 44(4): e471-e476, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320602

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to compare orthopedic patient preferences for mandated virtual care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and elective virtual care during non-pandemic circumstances. An orthopedic virtual care questionnaire was administered to adult orthopedic patients undergoing their first orthopedic virtual visit between March 15, 2020, and May 18, 2020. The questionnaire had 13 items rated on a 1-to-5 Likert scale ("strongly agree" to "strongly disagree"). Responses were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patients showed higher preferences for mandated virtual care during the pandemic when compared with elective virtual care during non-pandemic circumstances (2.25±1.31 vs 4.10±1.25, P<.0001) and also preferred virtual visits in other specialties compared with orthopedics (2.17±1.35 vs 2.79±1.42, P<.0001). Patients older than 50 years were more likely to view virtual care as the best option during the pandemic (2.06±1.25 vs 2.48±1.35, P<.0165) and equally as effective as in-person visits in non-pandemic circumstances (2.45±1.36 vs 2.83±1.18, P<.0150). Female patients were more likely to pursue future orthopedic virtual visits (2.61±1.37 vs 3.07±1.45, P<.0203) and view their virtual visit as equally effective as an in-person visit (2.47±1.33 vs 2.87±1.18, P<.0181). Orthopedic patient preference for mandated virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic seems to be higher than for elective virtual care during non-pandemic circumstances, and older and female patients appear to favor virtual care. [Orthopedics. 2021;44(4):e471-e476.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Orthopedics , Patient Preference , Telemedicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMC Palliat Care ; 20(1): 116, 2021 Jul 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding public attitudes towards death and dying is important to inform public policies around End of Life Care (EoLC). We studied the public attitudes towards death and dying in Wales. METHODS: An online survey was conducted in 2018. Social media and the HealthWiseWales platform were used to recruit participants. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. RESULTS: 2,210 people participated. Loss of independence (84%), manner of death, and leaving their beloved behind were the biggest fears around death and dying. In terms of EoLC, participants sought timely access to care (84%) and being surrounded by loved ones (62%). Being at home was less of a priority (24%). Only 50% were familiar with Advance Care Planning (ACP). A lack of standard procedures as well as of support for the execution of plans and the ability to revisit those plans hindered uptake. The taboo around death conversations, the lack of opportunities and skills to initiate discussion, and personal fear and discomfort inhibited talking about death and dying. 72% felt that we do not talk enough about death and dying and advocated normalising talking by demystifying death with a positive approach. Health professionals could initiate and support this conversation, but this depended on communication skills and manageable workload pressure. Participants encouraged a public health approach and endorsed the use of: a) social media and other public platforms, b) formal education, c) formal and legal actions, and d) signposting and access to information. CONCLUSIONS: People are ready to talk about death and dying and COVID-19 has increased awareness. A combination of top-down and bottom-up initiatives across levels and settings can increase awareness, knowledge, and service-utilisation-drivers to support health professionals and people towards shared decisions which align with people's end of life wishes and preferences.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Death , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Preference , Terminal Care , Adolescent , Adult , Advance Care Planning , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Communication , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Wales , Young Adult
14.
Ann Fam Med ; 19(4): 365-367, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311276

ABSTRACT

When the immediate threat of COVID-19 subsides, the future of health care will involve more virtual care. Before the pandemic, patient choice rather than clinician guidance determined which medium (telephone visits, video visits, electronic messaging) was used to receive care. Two media synchronicity theory principles-conveyance and convergence-can create a framework for determining how to choose the right medium of care for the patient. The author describes how it changed their practice and decision making with a patient story that required the use of multiple virtual care options.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child, Preschool , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Office Visits , Patient Care Planning , Patient Preference , SARS-CoV-2 , Syphilis/diagnosis , Telephone , Text Messaging , Videoconferencing
15.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 140, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295440

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health services internationally have been compelled to change their methods of service delivery in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, to mitigate the spread of infection amongst health professionals and patients. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, widespread electronic delivery of prescriptions (e-prescribing) was enabled. The aim of the research was to explore patients' experiences of how lockdown, changes to prescribing and the interface between general practices and community pharmacy affected access to prescription medications. METHOD: The research employed a mixed-method approach. This included an online survey (n = 1,010) and in-depth interviews with a subset of survey respondents (n = 38) during the first COVID-19 lockdown (March-May 2020). Respondents were recruited through a snowballing approach, starting with social media and email list contacts of the research team. In keeping with the approach, descriptive statistics of survey data and thematic analysis of qualitative interview and open-ended questions in survey data were combined. RESULTS: For most respondents who received a prescription during lockdown, this was sent directly to the pharmacy. Most people picked up their medication from the pharmacy; home delivery of medication was rare (4%). Survey and interview respondents wanted e-prescribing to continue post-lockdown and described where things worked well and where they encountered delays in the process of acquiring prescription medication. CONCLUSIONS: E-prescribing has the potential to improve access to prescription medication and is convenient for patients. The increase in e-prescribing during lockdown highlighted how the system could be improved, through better feedback about errors, more consistency across practices and pharmacies, more proactive communication with patients, and equitable prescribing costs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Electronic Prescribing , General Practice , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Community Pharmacy Services/standards , Community Pharmacy Services/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Electronic Prescribing/economics , Electronic Prescribing/standards , Electronic Prescribing/statistics & numerical data , Female , General Practice/methods , General Practice/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Zealand/epidemiology , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Health Care Poor Underserved ; 32(2): 1047-1058, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268208

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We preliminarily assessed challenges to developing a telemedicine program at a specialty clinic in a public safety-net hospital serving a diverse population. METHODS: Patients visiting a urology clinic were surveyed regarding potential follow-up telemedicine visits. A follow-up survey was performed during the COVID-19 pandemic to evaluate changing interest. RESULTS: Our pre-COVID study population consisted of 498 patients, speaking 17 primary languages; primarily, the population had MediCal or no insurance coverage (56.8%). Most had the capability to take part in telemedicine video calls (73.1%), though significantly fewer had the confidence (45.9%) or interest (51%). There was a distinct drop in capability, confidence, and interest with increasing age but not with preferred language. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we noted increased interest in non-traditional visits (n=100), with 79% stating they would repeat a non-in-person visit. CONCLUSION: Increasing interest in non-traditional visits during the COVID-19 pandemic suggests patient interest and confidence may be malleable.


Subject(s)
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Safety-net Providers , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Med Syst ; 45(7): 72, 2021 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258233

ABSTRACT

There is a rapidly evolving need for e-health to support chronic disease self-management and connect patients with their healthcare teams. Patients with cirrhosis have a high symptom burden, significant comorbidities, and a range of psychological and cognitive issues. Patients with cirrhosis were assessed for their readiness and interest in e-health. Adults attending one of two outpatient cirrhosis clinics in Alberta were recruited. Eligible participants were not required to own or have experience with digital technologies or the Internet. Medical history, socioeconomic status, and attitudes regarding e-health, the Computer Proficiency Questionnaire, and the Mobile Device Proficiency Questionnaire were used to describe participants' knowledge and skills. Of the 117 recruited patients, 68.4% owned a computer and 84.6% owned a mobile device. Patients had mean proficiency scores of 72.8% (SD 25.9%) and 69.3% (SD 26.4%) for these devices, respectively. In multiple regression analyses, significant predictors of device proficiency were age, education, and household income. Most patients (78.7%) were confident they could participate in videoconferencing after training and most (61.5%) were interested in an online personalized health management program. This diverse group of patients with cirrhosis had technology ownership, proficiency, and online behaviours similar to the general population. Moreover, the patients were very receptive to e-health if training was provided. This promising data is timely given the unique demands of COVID-19 and its influence on self-management and healthcare delivery to a vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
Computer Literacy , Internet , Liver Cirrhosis , Technology , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Alberta , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Preference
19.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(8): 543-546, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234178

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Social distancing due to COVID-19 may adversely impact treatment of adults with serious mental illness, especially those receiving intensive forms of community-based care, in part through weakening of the therapeutic alliance. Veterans and staff at a Veterans Affair (VA) medical center were surveyed 3 months after social distancing disrupted usual service delivery in intensive community-based treatment programs. Veterans (n = 105) and staff (n = 112) gave similar multi-item ratings of service delivery after social distancing, which involved far less face-to-face contact and more telephone contact than usual and rated their therapeutic alliances and clinical status similarly as "not as good" on average than before social distancing. Self-reported decline in therapeutic alliance was associated with parallel decline in clinical status indicators. Both veterans and staff indicated clear preference for return to face-to-face service delivery after the pandemic with some telehealth included.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Case Management/standards , Community Mental Health Services/standards , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Patient Preference , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine/standards , Therapeutic Alliance , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs , Veterans
20.
Scand J Urol ; 55(3): 177-183, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223275

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In March-April 2020, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown in Denmark, the Danish Health Authorities recommended that, where possible, face-to-face patient-physician consultations be replaced by telephone consultations. The aim of this study was to obtain patients' evaluation of their telemedicine experience. METHODS: Patients who were candidates for telemedicine consultations were recruited based on their urological ailment, necessity for follow-up and comorbidity. New referrals including patients with suspicion of cancer were not candidates for telemedicine. In total, 548 patients had their appointment altered during the period from 13 March to 30 April 2020. Postal questionnaires were sent to 548 patients and 300 (54.7%) replied. RESULTS: In total, 280 patient answered, 224 (80%) men and 56 (20%) women, mean age 69 years (range 18-91) of whom 180 (64.3%) had a benign and 100 (35.7%) a malignant diagnosis. Twenty (6.7%) respondents did not remember their telephone consultation and were therefore excluded. Telephone consultation satisfaction was reported by 230 (85.0%) patients, but they would not prefer video consultations over telephone consultations, and only 102 (36.4%) would prefer telephone consultations in the future. Patients' age, sex and distance to the hospital did not seem to be associated with telephone consultation satisfaction (age p = 0.17; sex p = 0.99; distance p = 0.27, respectively). In total, 226 (80.7%) were medically assessed as being at risk for COVID, but 74 (26.4%) subjectively evaluated themselves as being at risk. CONCLUSIONS: In general (85.0%), urological patients were satisfied with telephone consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Denmark , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Office Visits , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/methods , Videoconferencing , Young Adult
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