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1.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0282081, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323356

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is increasing in popularity but the impact of this shift on patient outcomes has not been well described. Prior data has shown that early post-discharge office visits can reduce readmissions. However, it is unknown if routine use of telemedicine visits for this purpose is similarly beneficial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational study using electronic health records data to assess if the rate of 30-day hospital readmissions differed between modality of visit for primary care or cardiology post-discharge follow-up visits. RESULTS: Compared to discharges with completed in-person follow-up visits, the adjusted odds of readmission for those with telemedicine follow-up visits was not significantly different (odds ratio [OR] 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61 to 1.51, P = 0.86). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that 30-day readmission rate did not differ significantly according to the modality of visit. These results provide reassurance that telemedicine visits are a safe and viable alternative for primary care or cardiology post-hospitalization follow-up.


Subject(s)
Patient Readmission , Telemedicine , Humans , Aftercare , Patient Discharge , Follow-Up Studies , Retrospective Studies
2.
West J Emerg Med ; 24(3): 405-415, 2023 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2323312

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Limited information exists on patients with suspected coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who return to the emergency department (ED) during the first wave. In this study we aimed to identify predictors of ED return within 72 hours for patients with suspected COVID-19. METHODS: Incorporating data from 14 EDs within an integrated healthcare network in the New York metropolitan region from March 2-April 27, 2020, we analyzed this data on predictors for a return ED visit-including demographics, comorbidities, vital signs, and laboratory results. RESULTS: In total, 18,599 patients were included in the study. The median age was 46 years old [interquartile range 34-58]), 50.74% were female, and 49.26% were male. Overall, 532 (2.86%) returned to the ED within 72 hours, and 95.49% were admitted at the return visit. Of those tested for COVID-19, 59.24% (4704/7941) tested positive. Patients with chief complaints of "fever" or "flu" or a history of diabetes or renal disease were more likely to return at 72 hours. Risk of return increased with persistently abnormal temperature (odds ratio [OR] 2.43, 95% CI 1.8-3.2), respiratory rate (2.17, 95% CI 1.6-3.0), and chest radiograph (OR 2.54, 95% CI 2.0-3.2). Abnormally high neutrophil counts, low platelet counts, high bicarbonate values, and high aspartate aminotransferase levels were associated with a higher rate of return. Risk of return decreased when discharged on antibiotics (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.0-0.3) or corticosteroids (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.0-0.9). CONCLUSION: The low overall return rate of patients during the first COVID-19 wave indicates that physicians' clinical decision-making successfully identified those acceptable for discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Patient Readmission , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Emergency Service, Hospital , Retrospective Studies
3.
Int J Infect Dis ; 130: 1-5, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318046

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: By better understanding the long-term effects of COVID-19 and assessing rehabilitation placement among the patients in our study, we hope to determine the predictors of rehabilitation needs in individuals suffering from the long-term sequelae of COVID-19. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed of adult patients with a positive COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction test among multiple hospitals in a regional health system. The main outcomes measured were discharge disposition, total length of hospital stay, and overall all-cause mortality and readmission rates within 30 and 90 days of discharge. RESULTS: Of the 2502 patients included in the study, we found that 65.2% were discharged to home, while the remaining patients were discharged to home healthcare (33.6%), skilled nursing facilities (31.7%), or long-term acute rehabilitation centers (11.6%). The overall all-cause mortality rate at 30 and 90 days were 2.7% and 4.4%, respectively. The overall all-cause 30-day and 90-day readmission rates were 7.0% and 7.6%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Younger age and shorter hospitalization stays were the most important predictors of home discharge. Discharge to home was also significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality rates at 30 and 90 days after discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge , Adult , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Hospitalization , Length of Stay , Patient Readmission
4.
Trials ; 23(1): 503, 2022 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Delivering acute hospital care to patients at home might reduce costs and improve patient experience. Mayo Clinic's Advanced Care at Home (ACH) program is a novel virtual hybrid model of "Hospital at Home." This pragmatic randomized controlled non-inferiority trial aims to compare two acute care delivery models: ACH vs. traditional brick-and-mortar hospital care in acutely ill patients. METHODS: We aim to enroll 360 acutely ill adult patients (≥18 years) who are admitted to three hospitals in Arizona, Florida, and Wisconsin, two of which are academic medical centers and one is a community-based practice. The eligibility criteria will follow what is used in routine practice determined by local clinical teams, including clinical stability, social stability, health insurance plans, and zip codes. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to ACH or traditional inpatient care, stratified by site. The primary outcome is a composite outcome of all-cause mortality and 30-day readmission. Secondary outcomes include individual outcomes in the composite endpoint, fall with injury, medication errors, emergency room visit, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU), cost, the number of days alive out of hospital, and patient-reported quality of life. A mixed-methods study will be conducted with patients, clinicians, and other staff to investigate their experience. DISCUSSION: The pragmatic trial will examine a novel virtual hybrid model for delivering high-acuity medical care at home. The findings will inform patient selection and future large-scale implementation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05212077. Registered on 27 January 2022.


Subject(s)
Hospitals , Quality of Life , Adult , Community Health Services , Hospitalization , Humans , Patient Readmission , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
5.
Postgrad Med ; 135(4): 379-385, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2290781

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to reveal the characteristics of pediatric emergency revisits of children with COVID-19 and the factors associated with clinical worsening and hospitalization at the revisit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In pediatric emergency visits of children between July 2020 and March 2021 with COVID-19, the patients who had a revisit within 7 days were included in the study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, test results, and the relationship of these variables with clinical worsening and hospitalization at the revisit were investigated. RESULTS: In 6779 children with COVID-19, 284 (4.1%) patients included in the study. 51.8% of the patients were male, the median age was 11.1 years, and median time to revisit time was 2.0 days. The rates of clinical worsening and hospitalization were 9.1% and 14.7%, respectively. Children younger than 24 months and those with chronic diseases were more commonly hospitalized at the revisit. Though the frequency of laboratory and radiologic testing at the revisit was significantly increased compared to the first presentation, tests did not play an important role in the decision-making processes. More than 85% of patients were clinically mild at the first presentation and revisit. CONCLUSIONS: Children with a diagnosis of COVID-19 can revisit the emergency without evident clinical worsening. Since revisits cause increase in frequency of laboratory and radiological testing, preventing unnecessary revisits of children with COVID-19 can reduce the workload and cost of health care services. We may consider changing our perspective on revisit patients to make decisions based on clinical findings instead of obtaining for more laboratory tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Readmission , Child , Humans , Male , Female , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitalization , Retrospective Studies
6.
J Hosp Med ; 17(3): 229-230, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280199
7.
Ann Fam Med ; (21 Suppl 1)2023 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285894

ABSTRACT

Context: The COVID19 pandemic stressed U.S. health systems beyond their capacity and created worsening clinical outcomes. Hospital a Home (HaH) programs were utilized infrequently prior to pandemic. The Acute Care at Home Waiver was introduced in 2020 to facilitate the creation of HaH programs with a goal of promoting treatment in the home setting. A potential alternative approach to creating rapid inpatient level health system capacity is providing hospital-level care at home to substitute for inpatient hospitalization. The overall impact on clinical outcomes of a HaH program in patients with COVID19 is not well understood. Objective: To compare clinical outcomes of a HaH program versus usual hospital care for patients admitted for COVID19. Study Design: Matched case-control retrospective chart review. Setting or Dataset: Academic medical center. Population studied: Patients admitted with COVID19 and subsequently enrolled into the HaH program from February 1, 2021 to January 31, 2022. Patients aged <18 were excluded from consideration for enrollment. A case-control sample was matched on age, gender, and severity of illness. A total of 200 patients (100 HaH and 100 control) were included for analysis. Outcome Measures: Primary outcome: 30-day readmissions, Secondary outcomes: Inpatient length of stay (iLOS) defined as length of stay in the physical hospital, total length of stay (tLOS) (sum of iLOS and HaH program days), time to readmission, and 30-day emergency department visits. Results: Analysis included 200 patents. The mean age was 50.4. The sample was 55% female. 48.5% were black, 43.5% were white, and 8% were other races. Compared with usual care patients, HaH patients had no difference in 30-day readmissions (11% vs. 14%, p=0.648), mean days to readmission (9.0 vs. 11.8, p=0.201), or return ED visits (17% vs. 20%, p=0.701). Inpatient LOS (5.7 vs. 9.4 days, p=0.005) was shorter in the HaH group. Total LOS (13.0 vs. 9.4 days, p<0. 001) was longer in the HaH group. Conclusions: The HaH program was associated with no difference in readmissions, time to readmission, or return ED visits compared to usual hospital care. HaH programs were associated with shorter inpatient length of stays, but longer total length of stays. In surge times, HaH programs could potentially reduce iLOS and increase bed capacity. Future studies should look to evaluate the economic impact of HaH programs and investigate the drivers of the increased tLOS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Length of Stay , Patient Readmission , Hospitals
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 287, 2023 Mar 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In July 2020, Mayo Clinic launched Advanced Care at Home (ACH), a high-acuity virtual hybrid hospital-at-home model (HaH) of care at Mayo Clinic Florida and Northwest Wisconsin, an urban destination medical center and a rural community practice respectively. This study aims to describe demographic characteristics of ACH patients as well as their acuity of illness using severity of illness (SOI) and risk of mortality (ROM), to illustrate the complexity of patients in the program, taking into account the different diagnostic related groups. METHODS: Mayo Clinic uses All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Groups (APR-DRG) to calculate SOI and ROM on hospitalized patients. APR-DRG data, including SOI and ROM, were gathered from individual chart reviews from July 6, 2020, to March 31, 2022. RESULTS:  Out of 923 patients discharged from ACH, the average APR-DRG SOI was 2.89 (SD 0.81) and ROM was 2.73. (SD 0.92). Mean age was 70.88 (SD 14.46) years, 54.6% were male patients and the average length of stay was 4.10 days. The most frequent diagnosis was COVID-19 infection with 162 patients (17.6%), followed by heart failure exacerbation (12.7%) and septicemia (10.9%). The 30-day readmission rate after discharge from ACH was 11.2% (n = 103) and the 30-day mortality rate was 1.8% (n = 17). There were no in-program patient deaths. CONCLUSIONS: SOI and ROM from patients at the ACH program have been shown to be in the range of "moderate/major" according to the APR-DRG classification. The ACH program is capable of accepting and managing highly complex patients that require advanced therapeutic means. Furthermore, the ACH program has an in-program mortality rate of 0 to date. Therefore, ACH is rising as a capable alternative to the brick-and-mortar hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Aged , Female , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Readmission , Patient Discharge , Severity of Illness Index , Length of Stay
10.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0279654, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effects of post-acute care (PAC) on frail older adults after acute hospitalization in Taiwan. METHODS: This was a multicenter interventional study. Frail patients aged ≥ 75 were recruited and divided into PAC or control group. The PAC group received comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and multifactorial intervention including exercise, nutrition education, and medicinal adjustments for two to four weeks, while the control group received only CGA. Outcome measures included emergency room (ER) visits, readmissions, and mortality within 90 days after PAC. RESULTS: Among 254 participants, 205 (87.6±6.0 years) were in the PAC and 49 (85.2±6.0 years) in the control group. PAC for more than two weeks significantly decreased 90-day ER visits (odds ratio [OR] 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.43; p = 0.024), readmissions (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.16-0.56; p < 0.001), and mortality (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.04-0.87; p = 0.032). Having problems in self-care was an independent risk factor for 90-day ER visits (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.17-3.78; p = 0.012), and having problems in usual activities was an independent risk factor for 90-day readmissions (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.53-4.72; p = 0.001) and mortality (OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.16-8.63; p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: PAC program for more than two weeks could have beneficial effects on decreasing ER visits, readmissions, and mortality after an acute illness in frail older patients. Those who perceived severe problems in self-care and usual activities had a higher risk of subsequent adverse outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT Identifier: NCT05452395.


Subject(s)
Frail Elderly , Patient Readmission , Aged , Humans , Subacute Care , Hospitalization , Emergency Service, Hospital , Geriatric Assessment
11.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(7): 2597-2609, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263688

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to explore the reasons for and experiences of patients who make an unplanned return visit to the emergency department. DESIGN: This study forms the qualitative phase of a larger explanatory sequential mixed methods study and is informed by interpretive description. The paper was prepared using the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research. METHODS: Semi-structured patient interviews were conducted over a 3-month period (July-September 2021). Data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Interviews from 13 participants generated findings related to experiences at and following their initial visit that contributed to their decision to return to the emergency department. Four themes were developed: (1) Patients experience barriers to feeling heard and having their concerns addressed; (2) Patients have little choice but to place their trust in clinicians; (3) Patients unexpectedly experience persistent symptoms which cannot be managed at home; and (4) Patients develop a sense of urgency about having their condition treated. CONCLUSION: A negative experience at the initial ED visit may have dual conflicting impacts. It can contribute to patients' perceived need for a return visit because they are ill-equipped to manage their condition at home, and it can also contribute to their initial reluctance to return to the ED when symptoms persist. Nurses and other clinicians working in ED need to actively build patient's experiential trust through clear communication, timely consultation and shared decision-making at discharge, which in turn can increase patient's confidence and capability to self-manage their condition. This study adds to the current body of literature about return visits by highlighting that a more positive experience of ED may assist patients to make better-informed decisions about when and how to seek treatment and minimize unnecessary and unplanned return visits. Whilst not an intended topic for exploration in this study, the COVID-19 pandemic influenced patients' experiences at both initial and return ED visits and limited their ability to access primary healthcare options. These experiences contributed to patients' decisions to make a return visit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Emergency Service, Hospital , Qualitative Research , Patients , Patient Readmission
12.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 42(3): e64-e69, 2023 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262171

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) rarely involves delayed giant coronary aneurysms, multiple readmissions or occurrence after COVID-19 vaccination. METHODS: We describe a child with all 3 of these unusual features. We discuss his clinical presentation, medical management, review of the current literature and CDC guidance recommendations regarding further vaccinations. RESULTS: A 5-year-old boy had onset of MIS-C symptoms 55 days after COVID-19 illness and 15 days after receiving his first BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccination. He was admitted 3 times for MIS-C, and twice after his steroid dose was tapered. On his initial admission, he was given intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids. During his second admission, new, moderate coronary dilation was noted, and he was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids. At his last admission, worsening coronary dilation was noted, and he was treated with infliximab and steroids. During follow-up, he had improvement in his coronary artery dilatation. However, his inflammatory markers increased after steroid wean, and his steroid taper was further extended, after which time his inflammatory markers improved. This is the only such reported case of a patient who was admitted 3 times for MIS-C complications after COVID-19 vaccination. CONCLUSION: MIS-C rarely involves delayed giant coronary aneurysms, multiple readmissions, or occurrence after COVID-19 vaccination. Whether our patient's COVID-19 vaccine 6 weeks after COVID-19 illness contributed to his MIS-C is unknown. After consultation with the CDC-funded Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Project, the patient's care team decided against further COVID-19 vaccination until at least 3 months post normalization of inflammatory markers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Aneurysm , Male , Child , Humans , Child, Preschool , COVID-19 Vaccines , BNT162 Vaccine , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Patient Readmission , Vaccination , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
13.
Am J Emerg Med ; 68: 102-105, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262120

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic there was a considerable drop in the number of visits to Pediatric Emergency Departments (PED). Unplanned return visits (URV) might represent inadequate emergency care. We assessed the impact of the pandemic on early URV to PEDs in Israel. METHODS: This multicenter cross-sectional study analyzed the 72-h URV to PEDs among patients under the age of 18 years during a one-year pandemic period (March 1st, 2020, to February 28th, 2021), and compared them with the 72-h URV of the corresponding pre-pandemic period (March 1st, 2019, to February 28th, 2020). Data was extracted from Clalit Health Services (CHS), the largest public health care organization in Israel. RESULTS: The pandemic and pre-pandemic early URV rates were 5465 (5.1%) and 8775 (5.6%), respectively (OR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.92-0.99). The rate of return-visit admissions to hospital wards during these periods were 29.5% and 32.1%, respectively (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.86-0.98). The rate of return-visit admissions to ICUs during these periods were 0.64% and 0.52%, respectively (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.62). On return-visit, 3 (0.055%) and 5 (0.057%) URV patients were declared dead on arrival during the pandemic and pre-pandemic periods, respectively (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.23-4.03). The distributions of the time interval from index visit to return visit remained consistent between the periods. DISCUSSION: In our study, early URV to PED's were only mildly influenced by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Patient Readmission , Pandemics , Israel/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital
14.
Vasc Endovascular Surg ; 57(6): 592-598, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2260910

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Assess heterogeneity within patients with resolved COVID-19 to broaden the vision about post-discharge thrombotic cases and postulate possible related mechanisms in search of better anticoagulation guidelines. This study details patients' characteristics, medical history, treatment, and outcomes of readmitted patients with late acute thrombosis through a systematic review of the literature and patients from our academic center database. METHODS: We extracted the records of patients readmitted for venous thrombosis complications after discharge from the database of the first 2000 patients admitted with COVID-19 in our academic center; we also performed a systematic review of the literature using the Medical Subject Headings terms "late thrombosis," "COVID-19," + "venous thrombosis" in PubMed and Google Scholar according to PRISMA guideline. RESULTS: The literature review found 20 patients suitable for review matching the inclusion criteria. These patients were added to those in our database, summing up a total of 26 patients. The median age was 50 years old, 76.9% were male, and most were overweight or had grade 1 obesity (n = 11, 42.3%). None had a previous thrombotic history, but 50% had an underlying comorbidity. Thrombotic events presented on a median of 20 days (range: 4-150 days) from discharge. Pulmonary embolisms occurred in 23 patients (88.46%), deep vein thrombosis in 4, mesenteric thrombosis, and cerebral venous thrombosis in 1, respectively. CONCLUSION: This study found that most patients readmitted for thrombotic events after COVID-19 discharge were middle-aged men with Venous Thrombo Embolism events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Embolism , Thrombosis , Venous Thrombosis , Middle Aged , Humans , Male , Female , COVID-19/complications , Patient Readmission , Aftercare , Treatment Outcome , Patient Discharge , Venous Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Thrombosis/complications , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use
15.
Can J Public Health ; 114(1): 62-71, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258551

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this systematic review was to identify the health impact of COVID-19 on mortality, morbidity, hospital admission, and hospital readmission rates in the Black population across Canada. METHODS: A comprehensive search strategy consisting of relevant subject headings and keywords was executed in five databases: OVID Medline, OVID Embase, EBSCO CINAHL Plus, Web of Science, and Scopus. Additional searches were conducted for gray literature in ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global, Google Scholar, and an advanced customized Google search for Canadian government documents. All eligible studies included in this review underwent quality assessment. RESULTS: Clinical health outcomes identified included mortality, morbidity, and hospital admission rates; none of the studies reported hospital readmission rates. The search identified 616 citations, and following the removal of duplicates and screening according to our inclusion/exclusion criteria, four articles were eligible for inclusion in the review. All of these studies were conducted in Canada. Study dates ranged from 2020 to 2021. CONCLUSION: A systematic review of studies on the impact of COVID-19 on the Black population in Canada highlights two key points. First, the collection and availability of race-based data are necessary to clarify the impact of COVID-19 and other diseases on Black populations in Canada. Second, with the limited available data, studies suggest that COVID-19 disproportionately impacts Black populations in Canada, making up high shares of cases, deaths, and hospitalizations compared to most of the population.


RéSUMé: OBJECTIF: L'objectif de cette revue systématique était d'identifier l'impact de la COVID-19 sur les taux de mortalité, de morbidité, d'admission à l'hôpital et de réadmission à l'hôpital dans la population noire au Canada. MéTHODES: Une stratégie de recherche complète composée des vedettes-matières et des mots-clés pertinents a été exécutée dans cinq bases de données : OVID Medline, OVID Embase, EBSCO CINAHL Plus, Web of Science et Scopus. Des recherches supplémentaires ont été effectuées pour la littérature grise dans ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global, Google Scholar et une recherche Google personnalisée pour les documents du gouvernement canadien. Toutes les études éligibles incluses dans cette revue ont fait l'objet d'une évaluation de la qualité. RéSULTATS: Les résultats de santé cliniques identifiés comprenaient les taux de mortalité, de morbidité et d'admission à l'hôpital; aucune des études n'a rapporté de taux de réadmission à l'hôpital. La recherche a identifié 616 citations et à la suite de la suppression des doublons et de la sélection selon nos critères d'inclusion/exclusion, quatre articles étaient éligibles pour l'inclusion dans la revue. Toutes ces études ont été menées au Canada. Les dates des études allaient de 2020 à 2021. CONCLUSION: Une revue systématique des études sur l'impact de la COVID-19 sur la population noire au Canada met en évidence deux points clés. Premièrement, la collection et la disponibilité de données fondées sur la race sont nécessaires pour mieux comprendre l'impact de la COVID-19 et d'autres maladies sur les populations noires au Canada. Deuxièmement, avec les données disponibles, les études suggèrent que la COVID-19 a un impact disproportionné sur les populations noires au Canada, représentant des proportions élevées de cas, de décès et d'hospitalisations par rapport à la plupart de la population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Canada/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Patient Readmission
16.
Rev Clin Esp (Barc) ; 223(4): 244-249, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19-12O-score has been validated to determine the risk of respiratory failure in patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Our study aims to assess whether the score is effective in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia discharged from a hospital emergency department (HED) to predict readmission and revisit. METHOD: Retrospective cohort of patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia discharged consecutively from an HUS of a tertiary hospital, from January 7 to February 17, 2021, where we applied the COVID-19-12O -score, with a cut-off point of 9 points to define the risk of admission or revisit. The primary outcome variable was revisit with or without hospital readmission after 30 days of discharge from HUS. RESULTS: We included 77 patients, with a median age of 59 years, 63.6% men and Charlson index of 2. 9.1% had an emergency room revisit and 15.3% had a deferred hospital admission. The relative risk (RR) for emergency journal was 0.46 (0.04-4.62, 95% CI, p=0.452), and the RR for hospital readmission was 6.88 (1.20-39.49, 95% CI, p<0.005). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19-12O -score is effective in determining the risk of hospital readmission in patients discharged from HED with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, but is not useful for assessing the risk of revisit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Female , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Patient Readmission , Emergency Service, Hospital
17.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 36(2): 339-343, 2023 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253881

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused a disruption in the usual primary care services offered and received by patients. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of family medicine appointment cancellations on hospital utilization metrics both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic within a family medicine residency clinic. METHODS: This study is a retrospective chart review of cohorts of patients with a family medicine clinic cancellation who presented to the emergency department during a similar time period before and during the pandemic (March-May of 2019 vs March-May 2020). The patient population studied has multiple chronic diagnoses and prescriptions. Hospital admission, hospital readmission, and length of stay for hospitalizations during these periods were compared. The impacts of appointment cancellations on the emergency department presentation with subsequent inpatient admission, readmission, and length of stay were examined using generalized estimating equation (GEE) logistic or Poisson regression models to account for the lack of independence between patient outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 1878 patients were included in the final cohorts. Of these patients, 101 (5.7%) presented to the emergency department and/or hospital in both 2019 and 2020. An increased odds of readmission was associated with family medicine appointment cancellation regardless of year. The effects of appointment cancellations were not associated with admissions or length of stay between 2019 and 2020. CONCLUSION: Between the 2019 and 2020 cohorts, appointment cancellations were not associated with significant differences in likelihood of admission, readmission, or length of stay. A higher risk of readmission was associated with patients with a recent family medicine appointment cancellation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Practice , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Readmission , Hospitals , Length of Stay
19.
Biosensors (Basel) ; 12(8)2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2285467

ABSTRACT

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significantly concerning disease, and is ranked highest in terms of 30-day hospital readmission. Generally, physical activity (PA) of daily living reflects the health status and is proposed as a strong indicator of 30-day hospital readmission for patients with COPD. This study attempted to predict 30-day hospital readmission by analyzing continuous PA data using machine learning (ML) methods. Data were collected from 16 patients with COPD over 3877 days, and clinical information extracted from the patients' hospital records. Activity-based parameters were conceptualized and evaluated, and ML models were trained and validated to retrospectively analyze the PA data, identify the nonlinear classification characteristics of different risk factors, and predict hospital readmissions. Overall, this study predicted 30-day hospital readmission and prediction performance is summarized as two distinct approaches: prediction-based performance and event-based performance. In a prediction-based performance analysis, readmissions predicted with 70.35% accuracy; and in an event-based performance analysis, the total 30-day readmissions were predicted with a precision of 72.73%. PA data reflect the health status; thus, PA data can be used to predict hospital readmissions. Predicting readmissions will improve patient care, reduce the burden of medical costs burden, and can assist in staging suitable interventions, such as promoting PA, alternate treatment plans, or changes in lifestyle to prevent readmissions.


Subject(s)
Patient Readmission , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Accelerometry , Exercise , Humans , Machine Learning , Retrospective Studies
20.
Crit Care Med ; 51(2): 212-221, 2023 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2239313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To characterize early unmet nonmedication discharge needs (UDNs), classified as durable medical equipment (DME), home health services (HHS), and follow-up medical appointments (FUAs) and explore their association with 90-day readmission and mortality among survivors of acute respiratory failure (ARF) who were discharged home. DESIGN: Prospective multicenter cohort study. SETTING: Six academic medical centers across United States. PARTICIPANTS: Adult survivors of ARF who required an ICU stay and were discharged home from hospital. INTERVENTIONS: None. Exposure of interest was the proportion of UDN for the following categories: DME, HHS, and FUA ascertained within 7-28 days after hospital discharge. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Two hundred eligible patients were recruited between January 2019 and August 2020. One-hundred ninety-five patients were included in the analytic cohort: 118 were prescribed DME, 134 were prescribed HHS, and 189 needed at least one FUA according to discharge plans. 98.4% (192/195) had at least one identified nonmedication need at hospital discharge. Median (interquartile range) proportion of unmet needs across three categories were 0 (0-15%) for DME, 0 (0-50%) for HHS, and 0 (0-25%) for FUA, and overall was 0 (0-20%). Fifty-six patients (29%) had 90-day death or readmission. After adjusting for prespecified covariates, having greater than the median level of unmet needs was not associated with an increased risk of readmission or death within 90 days of discharge (risk ratio, 0.89; 0.51-1.57; p = 0.690). Age, hospital length of stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II severity of illness score, and Multidimensional Scale Perceived Social Support score were associated with UDN. CONCLUSIONS: UDN were common among survivors of ARF but not significantly associated a composite outcome of 90-day readmission or death. Our results highlight the substantial magnitude of UDN and identifies areas especially vulnerable to lapses in healthcare coordination.


Subject(s)
Patient Discharge , Respiratory Insufficiency , Adult , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Patient Readmission , Cohort Studies , Hospitals , Survivors , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Length of Stay
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