Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 527
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Ital J Pediatr ; 48(1): 7, 2022 Jan 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634416

ABSTRACT

The fast diffusion of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic have called for an equally rapid evolution of the therapeutic options.The Human recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA) in subjects aged ≥12 with SARS-CoV-2 infection and specific risk factors.Currently the indications are specific for the use of two different mAbs combination: Bamlanivimab+Etesevimab (produced by Eli Lilly) and Casirivimab+Imdevimab (produced by Regeneron).These drugs have shown favorable effects in adult patients in the initial phase of infection, whereas to date few data are available on their use in children.AIFA criteria derived from the existing literature which reports an increased risk of severe COVID-19 in children with comorbidities. However, the studies analyzing the determinants for progression to severe disease are mainly monocentric, with limited numbers and reporting mostly generic risk categories.Thus, the Italian Society of Pediatrics invited its affiliated Scientific Societies to produce a Consensus document based on the revision of the criteria proposed by AIFA in light of the most recent literature and experts' agreement.This Consensus tries to detail which patients actually have the risk to develop severe disease, analyzing the most common comorbidities in children, in order to detail the indications for mAbs administration and to guide the clinicians in identifying eligible patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Patient Selection , Adolescent , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , Child , Consensus , Drug Combinations , Humans , Italy , Risk Factors , Societies, Medical
2.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(1): e21-e31, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586210

ABSTRACT

High-quality randomised clinical trials testing moderately fractionated breast radiotherapy have clearly shown that local control and survival is at least as effective as with 2 Gy daily fractions with similar or reduced normal tissue toxicity. Fewer treatment visits are welcomed by patients and their families, and reduced fractions produce substantial savings for health-care systems. Implementation of hypofractionation, however, has moved at a slow pace. The oncology community have now reached an inflection point created by new evidence from the FAST-Forward five-fraction randomised trial and catalysed by the need for the global radiation oncology community to unite during the COVID-19 pandemic and rapidly rethink hypofractionation implementation. The aim of this paper is to support equity of access for all patients to receive evidence-based breast external beam radiotherapy and to facilitate the translation of new evidence into routine daily practice. The results from this European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology Advisory Committee in Radiation Oncology Practice consensus state that moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy can be offered to any patient for whole breast, chest wall (with or without reconstruction), and nodal volumes. Ultrafractionation (five fractions) can also be offered for non-nodal breast or chest wall (without reconstruction) radiotherapy either as standard of care or within a randomised trial or prospective cohort. The consensus is timely; not only is it a pragmatic framework for radiation oncologists, but it provides a measured proposal for the path forward to influence policy makers and empower patients to ensure equity of access to evidence-based radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees/standards , Breast Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Patient Selection , Radiation Oncology/standards , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Europe , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Humans , Radiation Dose Hypofractionation
3.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211059675, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582485

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The fully-human monoclonal anti-interleukin (IL)-1ß antibody canakinumab may inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the hyperinflammatory response potentially leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. OBJECTIVES: The goal of our retrospective, observational analysis was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) canakinumab in combination with our standard of care (SOC) treatment of selected patients with COVID-19 with respiratory failure and elevated reactive pro-inflammatory markers. METHODS: Eight participants received two doses of s.c. canakinumab 150 mg (or 2 mg/kg for participants weighing ≤40 kg) in addition to SOC. 12 patients received only SOC treatment. RESULTS: Canakinumab treatment reduced the need for mechanical ventilation and reduced proinflammatory markers, resulting in an amelioration of the final outcome, with respect to the control group who received SOC alone. The treatment was safe and well tolerated; no adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: The use of canakinumab (300 mg, s.c.) in the early stage of COVID-19 with mild-to-moderate respiratory failure was superior to SOC at preventing clinical deterioration and may warrant further investigation as a treatment option for patients with COVID-19 who experience a hyperinflammatory response in the early stage of the disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Interleukin-1beta , Respiration, Artificial , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Interleukin-1beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Immunologic/methods , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Patient Selection , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment
4.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(12): e0010064, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581898

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Among the many collaterals of the COVID-19 pandemic is the disruption of health services and vital clinical research. COVID-19 has magnified the challenges faced in research and threatens to slow research for urgently needed therapeutics for Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) and diseases affecting the most vulnerable populations. Here we explore the impact of the pandemic on a clinical trial for plague therapeutics and strategies that have been considered to ensure research efforts continue. METHODS: To understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the trial accrual rate, we documented changes in patterns of all-cause consultations that took place before and during the pandemic at health centres in two districts of the Amoron'I Mania region of Madagascar where the trial is underway. We also considered trends in plague reporting and other external factors that may have contributed to slow recruitment. RESULTS: During the pandemic, we found a 27% decrease in consultations at the referral hospital, compared to an 11% increase at peripheral health centres, as well as an overall drop during the months of lockdown. We also found a nation-wide trend towards reduced number of reported plague cases. DISCUSSION: COVID-19 outbreaks are unlikely to dissipate in the near future. Declining NTD case numbers recorded during the pandemic period should not be viewed in isolation or taken as a marker of things to come. It is vitally important that researchers are prepared for a rebound in cases and, most importantly, that research continues to avoid NTDs becoming even more neglected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Impact Assessment , Neglected Diseases/drug therapy , Plague/drug therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research , Tropical Medicine/trends , Disease Notification , Epidemiological Monitoring , Humans , Madagascar/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Selection , Plague/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation/trends
5.
Curr Opin Organ Transplant ; 26(3): 302-308, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526214

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Over the past two decades, lung transplant has become the mainstay of treatment for several end-stage lung diseases. As the field continues to evolve, the criteria for referral and listing have also changed. The last update to these guidelines was in 2014 and several studies since then have changed how patients are transplanted. Our article aims to briefly discuss these updates in lung transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: This article discusses the importance of early referral of patients for lung transplantation and the concept of the 'transplant window'. We review the referral and listing criteria for some common pulmonary diseases and also cite the updated literature surrounding the absolute and relative contraindications keeping in mind that they are a constantly moving target. Frailty and psychosocial barriers are difficult to assess with the current assessment tools but continue to impact posttransplant outcomes. Finally, we discuss the limited data on transplantation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to COVID19 as well as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation bridge to transplantation. SUMMARY: The findings discussed in this article will strongly impact, if not already, how we select candidates for lung transplantation. It also addresses some aspects of lung transplant such as frailty and ARDS, which need better assessment tools and clinical data.


Subject(s)
Lung Diseases , Lung Transplantation , COVID-19 , Humans , Lung Diseases/surgery , Lung Transplantation/adverse effects , Patient Selection , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Lab Med ; 52(5): 493-498, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526169

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the role of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We included 110 patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Biochemical biomarkers, including MR-proADM, were measured at admission. The association of plasma MR-proADM levels with COVID-19 severity, defined as a requirement for mechanical ventilation or in-hospital mortality, was evaluated. RESULTS: Patients showed increased levels of MR-proADM. In addition, MR-proADM was higher in patients who died during hospitalization than in patients who survived (median, 2.59 nmol/L; interquartile range, 2.3-2.95 vs median, 0.82 nmol/L; interquartile range, 0.57-1.03; P <.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed good accuracy of MR-proADM for predicting mortality. A MR-proADM value of 1.73 nmol/L was established as the best cutoff value, with 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity (P <.0001). CONCLUSION: We found that MR-proADM could represent a prognostic biomarker of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adrenomedullin/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hypertension/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Protein Precursors/blood , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Hypertension/blood , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Interleukin-6/blood , Lung Diseases/blood , Lung Diseases/mortality , Lung Diseases/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Triage/methods
9.
Minerva Pediatr (Torino) ; 73(5): 460-466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513377

ABSTRACT

Inevitably, along with other healthcare specializations, pediatric surgery was affected by the Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children were reported to manifest mild to moderate symptoms and mortality was primarily observed in patients aged <1 year and having underlying comorbidities. Most of the cases were asymptomatic in children, hence, posing a challenge for pediatric surgery centers to take drastic measures to reduce the virus transmission. Telemedicine was introduced and out-patient consultations were conducted online as out-patient clinics were closed. Elective surgeries were postponed with delayed appointments while the healthcare sector was diverted towards tackling COVID-19. Case urgency was classified and triaged, leading to limited surgeries being performed only in COVID-19 negative patients following an extensive screening process. The screening process consisted of online history taking and RT-PCR tests. Newer practices such as mouth rinse, video laryngoscopy, and anesthesia were introduced to restrict patients from crying, coughing, and sneezing, as an attempt to avoid aerosolization of viral particles and safely conduct pediatric surgeries during the pandemic. Surgical trainees were also affected as the smaller number of surgeries conducted reduced the clinical experience available to medical enthusiasts. There is still room for advanced practices to be introduced in pediatric surgery and restore all kinds of surgeries to improve the quality of life of the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures , General Surgery/education , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Patient Selection , Pediatrics/education , Preoperative Care/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
10.
JBJS Rev ; 9(11)2021 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511873

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The utilization of outpatient shoulder arthroplasty has been increasing. With increasing pressure to reduce costs, further underscored by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many health-care organizations will move toward outpatient interventions to conserve inpatient resources. Although abundant literature has shown the advantages of outpatient total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there is a relative paucity describing outpatient shoulder arthroplasty. Thus, the purpose of this study was to summarize the peer-reviewed literature of outpatient shoulder arthroplasty with particular attention to patient selection, patient outcomes, and cost benefits. METHODS: The PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Embase databases were queried according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All articles on outpatient shoulder arthroplasty were included. Data on patient selection, patient outcomes, and cost analyses were recorded. Patient outcomes, including complications, reoperations, and readmissions, were analyzed by weighted average. RESULTS: Twenty-three articles were included for analysis. There were 3 review articles and 20 studies with Level-III or IV evidence as assessed per The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery Level of Evidence criteria. Patient selection was most often predicated on age <70 years, body mass index (BMI) <35 kg/m2, absence of active cardiopulmonary comorbidities, and presence of home support. Complications and readmissions were not common and either improved or were equivalent to those of inpatient shoulder arthroplasty. Patient satisfaction was high in studies of short-term and intermediate-term follow-up. The proposed cost benefit ranged from $747 to $53,202 with outpatient shoulder arthroplasty. CONCLUSIONS: The published literature to date supports outpatient shoulder arthroplasty as an effective, safe, and cost-reducing intervention with proper patient selection. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Shoulder , COVID-19 , Aged , Humans , Outpatients , Patient Outcome Assessment , Patient Selection , SARS-CoV-2
11.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0256839, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496495

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe and highly prevalent infection among people who inject drugs (PWID). While short-term (30-day) outcomes are similar between PWID and non-PWID, the long-term outcomes among PWID after IE are poor, with 1-year mortality rates in excess of 25%. Novel clinical interventions are needed to address the unique needs of PWID with IE, including increasing access to substance use treatment and addressing structural barriers and social determinants of health. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: PWID with IE will be connected to a multidisciplinary team that will transition with them from hospital to the community. The six components of the Second Heart Team are: (1) peer support worker with lived experience, (2) systems navigator, (3) addiction medicine physician, (4) primary care physician, (5) infectious diseases specialist, (6) cardiovascular surgeon. A convergent mixed-methods study design will be used to test the feasibility of this intervention. We will concurrently collect quantitative and qualitative data and 'mix' at the interpretation stage of the study to answer our research questions. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board (Project No. 7012). Results will be presented at national and international conferences and submitted for publication in a scientific journal. CLINICAL TRAIL REGISTRARION: Trial registration number: ISRCTN14968657 https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN14968657.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis/complications , Substance Abuse, Intravenous/complications , Clinical Trials as Topic , Disease Management , Endocarditis/therapy , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Patient Care Team , Patient Selection , Substance Abuse, Intravenous/therapy
12.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(11): 3178-3185, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491753

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus outbreak (COVID-19) in 2019 resulted in the suspension of all elective hospital procedures during the height of the pandemic in the UK. The Clinic in London is one of the first day-case hospitals to resume cosmetic surgery in a post-COVID-19 clinical environment, whilst also employing the use of virtual consultations. Details of the protocol implemented by the Clinic to allow the safe resumption of cosmetic surgery are stated in this paper. The volume of procedures at the Clinic saw a significant increase post-lockdown; reasons as to why this occurred are also explored in this paper. The disruption of cosmetic practice during lockdown can be said to have resulted in a backlog of procedures once lockdown restrictions began to ease. Whilst this may be true, we believe that there are other confounding factors regarding what may have influenced the rise in cosmetic surgery during the pandemic, including the privacy of working from home and the increased exposure to video conferencing software.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control , London/epidemiology , Patient Selection , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation , Retrospective Studies
13.
Int Urol Nephrol ; 53(6): 1149-1160, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491309

ABSTRACT

The use of Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (APD) in its various forms has increased over the past few years mainly in developed countries. This could be attributed to improved cycler design, apparent lifestyle benefits and the ability to achieve adequacy and ultrafiltration targets. However, the dilemma of choosing the superior modality between APD and Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) has not yet been resolved. When it comes to fast transporters and assisted PD, APD is certainly considered the most suitable Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) modality. Improved patients' compliance, lower intraperitoneal pressure and possibly lower incidence of peritonitis have been also associated with APD. However, concerns regarding increased cost, a more rapid decline in residual renal function, inadequate sodium removal and disturbed sleep are APD's setbacks. Besides APD superiority over CAPD in fast transporters, the other medical advantages of APD still remain controversial. In any case, APD should be readily available for all patients starting PD and the most important indication for its implementation remains patient's choice.


Subject(s)
Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Peritoneal Dialysis , Humans , Patient Selection , Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory
14.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 50(1): 59, 2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Canadian Society of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (CSO-HNS) task force published recommendations on performance of tracheotomy. Since then, our understanding of the virus has evolved with ongoing intensive research efforts. New literature has helped us better understand various aspects including patient outcomes and health care worker (HCW) risks associated with tracheotomy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Accordingly, the task force has re-evaluated and revised some of the previous recommendations. MAIN BODY: Based on recent evidence, a negative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) COVID-19 swab status is no longer the main deciding factor in the timing of tracheotomy. Instead, tracheotomy may be considered as soon as COVID-19 swab positive patients are greater than 20 days beyond initial symptoms and 2 weeks of mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, both open and percutaneous surgical techniques may be considered with both techniques showing similar safety and outcome profiles. Additional recommendations with discussion of current evidence are presented. CONCLUSION: These revised recommendations apply new evidence in optimizing patient and health care system outcomes as well as minimizing risks of COVID-19 transmission during aerosol-generating tracheotomy procedures. As previously noted, additional evidence may lead to further evolution of these and other similar recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control , Otolaryngology , Tracheotomy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , Canada , Critical Care , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Patient Selection , Practice Guidelines as Topic
16.
J Med Ethics ; 46(8): 505-507, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467731

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is reducing the ability to perform surgical procedures worldwide, giving rise to a multitude of ethical, practical and medical dilemmas. Adapting to crisis conditions requires a rethink of traditional best practices in surgical management, delving into an area of unknown risk profiles. Key challenging areas include cancelling elective operations, modifying procedures to adapt local services and updating the consenting process. We aim to provide an ethical rationale to support change in practice and guide future decision-making. Using the four principles approach as a structure, Medline was searched for existing ethical frameworks aimed at resolving conflicting moral duties. Where insufficient data were available, best guidance was sought from educational institutions: National Health Service England and The Royal College of Surgeons. Multiple papers presenting high-quality, reasoned, ethical theory and practice guidance were collected. Using this as a basis to assess current practice, multiple requirements were generated to ensure preservation of ethical integrity when making management decisions. Careful consideration of ethical principles must guide production of local guidance ensuring consistent patient selection thus preserving equality as well as quality of clinical services. A critical issue is balancing the benefit of surgery against the unknown risk of developing COVID-19 and its associated complications. As such, the need for surgery must be sufficiently pressing to proceed with conventional or non-conventional operative management; otherwise, delaying intervention is justified. For delayed operations, it is our duty to quantify the long-term impact on patients' outcome within the constraints of pandemic management and its long-term outlook.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Decision Making/ethics , Ethics, Medical , General Surgery/ethics , Health Equity/ethics , Pandemics/ethics , Patient Selection/ethics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cost-Benefit Analysis , England , Ethical Analysis , Ethical Theory , Humans , Informed Consent/ethics , Moral Obligations , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Principle-Based Ethics , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Surgeons , Surgical Procedures, Operative
19.
J Am Coll Surg ; 232(5): 682-689.e5, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: If Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are not recognized within patients in health services research, we miss an opportunity to ensure health equity in patient outcomes. However, it is unknown what the rates are of AAPIs inclusion in surgical outcomes research. STUDY DESIGN: Through a scoping review, we used Covidence to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus, and CINAHL for studies published in 2008-2018 using NSQIP data. NSQIP was chosen because of its national scope, widespread use in research, and coding inclusive of AAPI patients. We examined the proportion of studies representing AAPI patients in the demographic characteristics and Methods, Results, or Discussion section. We then performed multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between study characteristics and AAPI inclusion. RESULTS: In 1,264 studies included for review, 62% included race. Overall, only 22% (n = 278) of studies included AAPI patients. Of studies that included race, 35% represented AAPI patients in some component of the study. We found no association between sample size or publication year and inclusion. Studies were significantly more likely to represent AAPI patients when there was a higher AAPI population in the region of the first author's institution (lowest vs highest tercile; p < 0.001). Studies with a focus on disparities were more likely to include AAPI patients (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study is the first to examine AAPI representation in surgical outcomes research. We found < 75% of studies examine race, despite availability within NSQIP. Little more than one-third of studies including race reported on AAPI patients as a separate group. To provide the best care, we must include AAPI patients in our research.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Research/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Research/standards , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Specialties, Surgical/standards , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...