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1.
Anaesthesist ; 70(7): 582-597, 2021 07.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453677

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic the government of the state of Bavaria, Germany, declared a state of emergency for its entire territory for the first time in history. Some areas in eastern Bavaria were among the most severely affected communities in Germany, prompting authorities and hospitals to build up capacities for a surge of COVID-19 patients. In some areas, intensive care unit (ICU) capacities were heavily engaged, which occasionally made a redistribution of patients necessary. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For managing COVID-19-related hospital capacities and patient allocation, crisis management squads in Bavaria were expanded by disaster task force medical officers ("Ärztlicher Leiter Führungsgruppe Katastrophenschutz" [MO]) with substantial executive authority. The authors report their experiences as MO concerning the superordinate patient allocation management in the district of Upper Palatinate (Oberpfalz) in eastern Bavaria. RESULTS: By abandoning routine patient care and building up additional ICU resources, surge capacity for the treatment of COVID-19 patients was generated in hospitals. In parts of the Oberpfalz, ICU capacities were almost entirely occupied by patients with corona virus infections, making reallocation to other hospitals within the district and beyond necessary. The MO managed patient pathways in an escalating manner by defining local (within the region of responsibility of a single MO), regional (within the district), and cross-regional (over district borders) reallocation lanes, as needed. When regional or cross-regional reallocation lanes had to be established, an additional management level located at the district government was involved. Within the determined reallocation lanes, emitting and receiving hospitals mutually agreed on any patient transfer without explicitly involving the MO, thereby maintaining the established interhospital routine transfer procedures. The number of patients and available treatment resources at each hospital were monitored with the help of a web-based treatment capacity registry. If indicated, reallocation lanes were dynamically revised according to the present situation. To oppose further virus spreading in nursing homes, the state government prohibited patient allocation to these facilities, which led to considerably longer hospital length of stay of convalescent elderly and/or dependent patients. In parallel to the flattening of the COVID-19 incidence curve, routine hospital patient care could be re-established in a stepwise manner. CONCLUSION: Patient allocation during the state of emergency by the MO sought to keep up routine interhospital reallocation procedures as much as possible, thereby reducing management time and effort. Occasionally, difficulties were observed during patient allocations crossing district borders, if other MO followed different management principles. The nursing home blockade and conflicting financial interests of hospitals posed challenges to the work of the disaster task force medical officers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Decision Making, Organizational , Pandemics , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , Critical Care , Disease Management , Emergency Service, Hospital , Germany , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Nursing Homes , Patient Transfer , Research Report , Resource Allocation
2.
Anaesthesist ; 70(7): 573-581, 2021 07.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453676

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In a pandemic situation the overall mortality rate is of considerable interest; however, these data must always be seen in relation to the given healthcare system and the availability of local level of care. A recently published German data evaluation of more than 10,000 COVID-19 patients treated in 920 hospitals showed a high mortality rate of 22% in hospitalized patients and of more than 50% in patients requiring invasive ventilation. Because of the high infection rates in Bavaria, a large number of COVID-19 patients with considerable severity of disease were treated at the intensive care units of the LMU hospital. The LMU hospital is a university hospital and a specialized referral center for the treatment of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVE: Data of LMU intensive care unit (ICU) patients were systematically evaluated and compared with the recently published German data. METHODS: Data of all COVID-19 patients with invasive and noninvasive ventilation and with completed admission at the ICU of the LMU hospital until 31 July 2020 were collected. Data were processed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: In total 70 critically ill patients were included in the data evaluation. The median SAPS II on admission to the ICU was 62 points. The median age was 66 years and 81% of the patients were male. More than 90% were diagnosed with ARDS and received invasive ventilation. Treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was necessary in 10% of the patients. The median duration of ventilation was 16 days, whereby 34.3% of patients required a tracheostomy. Of the patients 27.1% were transferred to the LMU hospital from external hospitals with reference to our ARDS/ECMO program. Patients from external hospitals had ARDS of higher severity than the total study population. In total, nine different substances were used for virus-specific treatment of COVID-19. The most frequently used substances were hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. Immunomodulatory treatment, such as Cytosorb® (18.6%) and methylprednisolone (25.7%) were also frequently used. The overall in-hospital mortality rate of ICU patients requiring ventilation was 28.6%. The mortality rates of patients from external hospitals, patients with renal replacement therapy and patients with ECMO therapy were 47.4%, 56.7% and 85.7%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The mortality rate in the ventilated COVID-19 intensive care patients was considerably different from the general rate in Germany. The data showed that treatment in an ARDS referral center could result in a lower mortality rate. Low-dose administration of steroids may be another factor to improve patient outcome in a preselected patient population. In the authors' opinion, critically ill COVID-19 patients should be treated in an ARDS center provided that sufficient resources are available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Germany , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, University , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Transfer , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
3.
Crit Care Med ; 49(9): 1439-1450, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434523

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of ICU surge on mortality and to explore clinical and sociodemographic predictors of mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis. SETTING: NYC Health + Hospitals ICUs. PATIENTS: Adult ICU patients with coronavirus disease 2019 admitted between March 24, and May 12, 2020. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Hospitals reported surge levels daily. Uni- and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess factors impacting in-hospital mortality. Mortality in Hispanic patients was higher for high/very high surge compared with low/medium surge (69.6% vs 56.4%; p = 0.0011). Patients 65 years old and older had similar mortality across surge levels. Mortality decreased from high/very high surge to low/medium surge in, patients 18-44 years old and 45-64 (18-44 yr: 46.4% vs 27.3%; p = 0.0017 and 45-64 yr: 64.9% vs 53.2%; p = 0.002), and for medium, high, and very high poverty neighborhoods (medium: 69.5% vs 60.7%; p = 0.019 and high: 71.2% vs 59.7%; p = 0.0078 and very high: 66.6% vs 50.7%; p = 0.0003). In the multivariable model high surge (high/very high vs low/medium odds ratio, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8), race/ethnicity (Black vs White odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.0 and Asian vs White odds ratio 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.3; other vs White odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI, 1.0-2.3), age (45-64 vs 18-44 odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.5 and 65-74 vs 18-44 odds ratio, 5.1; 95% CI, 3.3-8.0 and 75+ vs 18-44 odds ratio, 6.8; 95% CI, 4.7-10.1), payer type (uninsured vs commercial/other odds ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.3; medicaid vs commercial/other odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5), neighborhood poverty (medium vs low odds ratio 1.6, 95% CI, 1.0-2.4 and high vs low odds ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.3-2.5), comorbidities (diabetes odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0 and asthma odds ratio, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.8 and heart disease odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 2.0-3.3), and interventions (mechanical ventilation odds ratio, 8.8; 95% CI, 6.1-12.9 and dialysis odds ratio, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.9-4.7) were significant predictors for mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Patients admitted to ICUs with higher surge scores were at greater risk of death. Impact of surge levels on mortality varied across sociodemographic groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Analysis of Variance , Female , Hospital Mortality/ethnology , Hospitals, Public/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Odds Ratio , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
6.
J Healthc Eng ; 2021: 2770846, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358936

ABSTRACT

Patient transfer has always been a difficult problem, usually requiring multiple caregivers to work together, which is time consuming and can easily cause secondary injuries to the patient. In addition, with the crisis of COVID-19, the issue of patient transfer is even more critical, as caregivers are at a high risk of infection, causing significant damage to healthcare resources. In this paper, a patient transfer assist system named E-pat-plus (Easy Patient Transfer plus) has been proposed; it can assist caregivers in transferring patients, reduce direct contact between them, and avoid secondary injuries. In the mechanical structure of this apparatus, a novel five-gear assembly module and a synchronous belt pulley set are proposed; they are the key points to the basic functional realization of the device and can reduce the cost of the prototype. Furthermore, a fuzzy (proportion-integration-differentiation) PID-based cross-coupling control strategy is applied to the apparatus to ensure the stability and safety of the operation. Finally, some preliminary experiments, including current experiments and error experiments, are carried out to verify the reliability of the device and lay the foundation for clinical tests.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Equipment Design , Patient Transfer/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results
7.
Open Heart ; 8(2)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341341

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen the introduction of important public health measures to minimise the spread of the virus. We aim to identify the impact government restrictions and hospital-based infection control procedures on ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients meeting ST elevation criteria and undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention from 27 March 2020, the day initial national lockdown measures were announced in Ireland, were included in the study. Patients presenting after the lockdown period, from 18 May to 31 June 2020, were also examined. Time from symptom onset to first medical contact (FMC), transfer time and time of wire cross was noted. Additionally, patient characteristics, left ventricular ejection fraction, mortality and biochemical parameters were documented. Outcomes and characteristics were compared against a control group of patients meeting ST elevation criteria during the month of January. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients presented with STEMI during the lockdown period. A significant increase in total ischaemic time (TIT) was noted versus controls (8.81 hours (±16.4) vs 2.99 hours (±1.39), p=0.03), with increases driven largely by delays in seeking FMC (7.13 hours (±16.4) vs 1.98 hours (±1.46), p=0.049). TIT remained significantly elevated during the postlockdown period (6.1 hours (±5.3), p=0.05), however, an improvement in patient delays was seen versus the control group (3.99 hours (±4.5), p=0.06). There was no difference seen in transfer times and door to wire cross time during lockdown, however, a significant increase in transfer times was seen postlockdown versus controls (1.81 hours (±1.0) vs 1.1 hours (±0.87), p=0.004). CONCLUSION: A significant increase in TIT was seen during the lockdown period driven mainly by patient factors highlighting the significance of public health messages on public perception. Additionally, a significant delay in transfer times to our centre was seen postlockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Aged , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Ireland , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Transfer/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
10.
Am J Med Qual ; 36(5): 368-370, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294787

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 continues to challenge bed capacity and the ability of hospitals to provide quality care for patients around the country. However, the COVID-19 pandemic at a given point in time does not impact all hospitals equally-even within a single healthcare system, one hospital may be caring for patients in the hallways, while another has available inpatient beds. Here, we demonstrate a program to level-load COVID-19 patients between 2 academic medical centers in a healthcare system by transferring patients at the time of admission from the emergency department of one institution directly to an inpatient bed of the other institution. Over 42 days, 50 patients were transferred which saved 432 bed-days at the home academic medical center without any adverse events during transfer or upgrades to the ICU within the first 24 hours of admission. Programs like this can expand a healthcare system's ability to allocate personnel and resources efficiently for patients and maximize the quality of care delivered even during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Pandemics , Patient Transfer , Academic Medical Centers , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units
11.
West J Emerg Med ; 22(3): 561-564, 2021 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266891

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a reduction in emergency department (ED) visits was seen nationally according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, no data currently exists for the impact of ED transfers to a higher level of care during this same time period. The primary objective of the study was to determine whether the COVID-19 pandemic affected the rate of non-COVID-19 transfers from a rural community ED. METHODS: We completed a retrospective chart review of all ED patients who presented to Kingman Regional Medical Center in Kingman, Arizona, from March 1-June 31, 2019 and March 1-June 31, 2020. To ensure changes were not due to seasonal trends, we examined transfer rates from the same four-month period in 2019 and 2020. Patients were included in the study if they were transferred to an outside facility for a higher level of care not related to COVID-19. RESULTS: Between the time periods studied there was a 25.33% (P = 0.001) reduction in total ED volume and a 21.44% (P = 0.009) reduction in ED transfers to a higher level of care. No statistical difference was noted in ED transfer volume following adjustment for decreased ED volumes. Transfers for gastroenterology (45%; P = 0.021), neurosurgery (29.2%; P = 0.029), neurology (76.3%; P < 0.001), trauma (37.5%; P = 0.039), urology (41.8%; P = 0.012), and surgery (56.3%; P = 0.028) all experienced a decrease in transfer rates during the time period studied. When gender was considered, males exhibited an increased rate of transfers to psychiatric facilities (P = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Significant reductions in both ED volume and transfers have coincided with the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Further research is needed to determine how the current pandemic has affected patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Arizona/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Air Med J ; 40(4): 220-224, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245832

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There are limited data regarding the typical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients requiring interfacility transport or the clinical capabilities of the out-of-hospital transport clinicians required to provide safe transport. The objective of this study is to provide epidemiologic data and highlight the clinical skill set and decision making needed to transport critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of persons under investigation for COVID-19 transported during the first 6 months of the pandemic by Johns Hopkins Lifeline was performed. Patients who required interfacility transport and tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 by polymerase chain reaction assay were included in the analysis. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients (25.4%) required vasopressor support, 35 patients (13.1%) were pharmacologically paralyzed, 15 (5.60%) were prone, and 1 (0.75%) received an inhaled pulmonary vasodilator. At least 1 ventilator setting change occurred for 59 patients (22.0%), and ventilation mode was changed for 11 patients (4.10%) during transport. CONCLUSION: The safe transport of critically ill patients with COVID-19 requires experience with vasopressors, paralytic medications, inhaled vasodilators, prone positioning, and ventilator management. The frequency of initiated critical interventions and ventilator adjustments underscores the tenuous nature of these patients and highlights the importance of transport clinician reassessment, critical thinking, and decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Critical Care/methods , Transportation of Patients/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Combined Modality Therapy , Critical Care/standards , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Maryland , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Patient Transfer/methods , Patient Transfer/standards , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Transportation of Patients/standards , Transportation of Patients/statistics & numerical data
13.
Air Med J ; 40(4): 211-215, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237589

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As part of the humanitarian response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the German and French Armed Forces provided air transport for patients from overwhelmed regional hospitals in Italy and France. The objective of this study was to analyze the characteristics of the missions and the medical conditions of COVID-19 patients transported during an air medical evacuation on fixed wing aircraft in March and April 2020. METHOD: This was a retrospective analysis of transport records as well as other documents for 58 COVID-19 patients requiring artificial ventilation. RESULTS: The median age of the transported patients was 61.5 years, and 61% of them had preexisting medical conditions. They had been ventilated for a median of 5 days and experienced the first symptoms 18 days before transport. The patients flown out of France had less days of ventilation before flight, a lower end-tidal carbon dioxide level at the beginning of the flight, and a lower Charlson Comorbidity Index. There were also some differences between the ventilation and the flight level flown by the 2 air forces. CONCLUSION: The intensive care transport of ventilated COVID-19 patients requires highly qualified personnel and appropriate equipment and should be planned appropriately.


Subject(s)
Air Ambulances , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Patient Transfer , Aged , Air Ambulances/organization & administration , Air Ambulances/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/organization & administration , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Transfer/methods , Patient Transfer/organization & administration , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Int Heart J ; 62(3): 540-545, 2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216967

ABSTRACT

This study aims to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on patient admissions to Hunan's cardiac intensive care units (CCUs).We conducted a retrospective, single-center study. Data were collected from patients who were confirmed to have critical cardiovascular disease and admitted to the CCU of the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Hunan, from January 23 to April 23, 2020. Compared with the same period in 2019, the results show that the number of hospitalization decreased by 19.6%; the inhospital mortality rate of CCU was decreased (28.57% versus 16.67%; odds ratio (OR), 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.251-0.996; P = 0.047); hospital stay was decreased (7.97 versus 12.36, P < 0.001); hospital emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) rate in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) significantly decreased (76.00% versus 39.00%, P < 0.001); among this, the PCI rate of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) decreased (76.32% versus 55.17%, P = 0.028) as well. In addition, the number of patients transferred from other hospitals significantly decreased (76.79% versus 56.67%, P = 0.002), and the number of patients transferred from other cities also decreased by 10.75%.During the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic in Hunan Province, the number of patients admitted to CCU decreased, as well as the mortality rate; fewer patients with severe cardiovascular disease can be transported to better hospitals from remote rural areas. In addition to epidemic prevention and control, experts in China should focus on improved emergency transport medical services to reduce this impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Coronary Care Units/trends , Hospital Mortality/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Patient Transfer/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
16.
S Afr Med J ; 111(4): 304-306, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215691

ABSTRACT

The new 501Y.V2 variant of COVID-19 has led to a rapid increase in the number of persons infected with the virus in South Africa, and state and private hospitals are having to turn patients away. Although it is common practice for patients to be transferred between provinces for specialist care, the upsurge in the COVID-19 pandemic has led to some hospitals considering reserving intensive care and critical care beds for COVID-19 patients from their province. The Constitution provides that nobody may be refused emergency medical treatment, nor may they be unfairly discriminated against. This is also implicit in the 'equitable' provision of healthcare services referred to in the National Health Act 61 of 2003. The Critical Care Society of Southern Africa COVID-19 guidelines, or other similar widely accepted guidelines, may be used, provided they do not unfairly discriminate against patients on the basis of age. According to the Constitution, a hospital that wishes to turn away an emergency treatment request from another province because it is reserving beds for COVID-19 patients from its home province will have to show that it is 'reasonable and justifiable' to do so. It will have to show that the other province's patient was being subjected to the same criteria for admission as its home province COVID-19 patients, because, for instance, occupation of the bed by another COVID-19 patient from the home province was imminent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Refusal to Treat , Critical Care , Crowding , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Transfer , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prejudice , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology
17.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(8): 105857, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213403

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize differences in disposition arrangement among rehab-eligible stroke patients at a Comprehensive Stroke Center before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a prospective registry for demographics, hospital course, and discharge dispositions of rehab-eligible acute stroke survivors admitted 6 months prior to (10/2019-03/2020) and during (04/2020-09/2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary outcome was discharge to an inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) as opposed to other facilities using descriptive statistics, and IRF versus home using unadjusted and adjusted backward stepwise logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the 507 rehab-eligible stroke survivors, there was no difference in age, premorbid disability, or stroke severity between study periods (p>0.05). There was a 9% absolute decrease in discharges to an IRF during the pandemic (32.1% vs. 41.1%, p=0.04), which translated to 38% lower odds of being discharged to IRF versus home in unadjusted regression (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.42-0.92, p=0.016). The lower odds of discharge to IRF persisted in the multivariable model (aOR 0.16, 95%CI 0.09-0.31, p<0.001) despite a significant increase in discharge disability (median discharge mRS 4 [IQR 2-4] vs. 2 [IQR 1-3], p<0.001) during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Admission for stroke during the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a significantly lower probability of being discharged to an IRF. This effect persisted despite adjustment for predictors of IRF disposition, including functional disability at discharge. Potential reasons for this disparity are explored.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge/trends , Patient Transfer/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke Rehabilitation/trends , Stroke/therapy , Aged , Disability Evaluation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Jersey , Recovery of Function , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/physiopathology , Time Factors
18.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(3): 682-688, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761756

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to further knowledge of older Veterans' experiences with transitioning to the community from Veterans Affairs nursing homes (Community Living Centers or CLCs) with emphasis on social functioning. DESIGN: A qualitative study design was used in addition to administration of standardized depression and mental status screens. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Veterans (n = 18) and caregivers (n = 14) were purposively sampled and recruited from 2 rural CLCs in Upstate New York. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were completed with Veterans in the CLC prior to discharge (to explore experiences during the CLC stay and expectations regarding discharge and returning home) and in the home 2-4 weeks postdischarge (to explore daily routines and perceptions of overall health, mental health, and social functioning). Caregivers participated in 1 interview, completed postdischarge. The 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the Brief Interview for Mental Status were administered postdischarge. RESULTS: Thematic analysis of verbatim transcriptions revealed 3 inter-related themes: (1) Veterans may experience improved social connectedness in CLCs by nature of the unique care environment (predominantly male, shared military experience); (2) Experiences of social engagement and connectedness varied after discharge and could be discordant with Veterans' expectations for recovery prior to discharge; and (3) Veterans may or may not describe themselves as "lonely" after discharge, when physically isolated. Veterans lacked moderate to severe cognitive impairment (Brief Interview for Mental Status: range = 14-15); however, they reported a wide range in depressive symptom severity postdischarge (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire: mean = 4.9, SD = 6.1, median/mode = 3, range = 0-23). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: This study identified a potential for increased social isolation and disengagement after discharge from Veterans Affairs nursing homes. Nursing homes should integrate social functioning assessment for their residents, while extending care planning and transitional care to address patient-centered social functioning goals.


Subject(s)
Veterans , Aftercare , Humans , Male , New York , Nursing Homes , Patient Discharge , Patient Transfer , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
19.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 78(13): 1207-1215, 2021 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169632

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The implementation of a pharmacist-managed transition of care program for kidney transplant recipients with posttransplant hyperglycemia (PTHG) is described. METHODS: In September 2015, a collaborative practice agreement between pharmacists and transplant providers at an academic medical center for management of PTHG was developed. The goal of the pharmacist-run service was to reduce hospitalizations by providing care to patients in the acute phase of hyperglycemia while they transitioned back to their primary care provider or endocrinologist. For continuous quality improvement, preimplementation data were collected from August 2014 to August 2015 and compared to postimplementation data collected from August 2017 to August 2018. The primary endpoint was hospitalizations due to hyperglycemia within 90 days post transplantation. Secondary endpoints included emergency department (ED) visits due to hypoglycemia and the number of interventions performed, number of encounters completed, and number of ED visits or admissions for hypoglycemia. A Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical data, and a Student t test was used to compare continuous data. A P value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: Forty-three patients in the preimplementation group were compared to 35 patients in the postimplementation group. There was a significant reduction in hospitalizations due to hyperglycemia in the postimplementation versus the preimplementation group (9 vs 1, P < 0.05); there was a reduction in ED visits due to hyperglycemia (5 vs 0, P = 0.06). There were no ED visits or hospitalizations due to hypoglycemia in either group. Clinical transplant pharmacists performed an average of 8.3 (SD, 4.4) encounters per patient per 90 days. CONCLUSION: A collaborative practice agreement was created and successfully implemented. A pharmacist-managed PTHG program could be incorporated into the standard care of kidney transplant recipients to help minimize rehospitalizations due to hyperglycemia.


Subject(s)
Hyperglycemia , Hypoglycemia , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Hyperglycemia/etiology , Patient Transfer , Pharmacists , Retrospective Studies
20.
J Intensive Care Med ; 36(6): 704-710, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145419

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Critical care transport is associated with a high rate of adverse events, and the risks and outcomes of transporting critically ill patients during the COVID-19 pandemic have not been previously described. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of transports of subjects with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 from sending hospitals to tertiary care hospitals in Boston. Follow-up data were obtained for patients transported between March 1st and April 20th, 2020. RESULTS: Of 254 charts identified, 250 patients were transported. Nine patients (3.5%) had cardiac arrest prior to transport. Twenty-nine (11.6%) had hypotension, 22 (8.8%) had a critical desaturation, and 4 (1.6%) had both en route. Hospital follow-up data were available for 189 patients. Of those intubated during their hospitalization, 44 (25.0%) had died, 59 (33.5%) had been extubated, and 13 (17.6%) had been discharged alive. For the subgroup with prior cardiac arrest, follow-up data available for 6. Of these 6, 2 died and 4 (66.7%) have been discharged alive. CONCLUSIONS: Few patients with COVID-19 had an adverse event in transport. The in-hospital mortality rate was 25%, with a 33.5% extubation rate. Patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest prior to transport had a 66.7% discharge rate among those transported to consortium hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Transportation of Patients , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Transfer , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
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