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6.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 183, 2021 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403252

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Physicians play a key role in driving vaccine acceptance and their recommendations are crucial to address vaccine hesitancy. The aim of the study was to assess knowledge, awareness and attitude of Italian Pediatric Health Care Professionals (pHCPs) on vaccinations. METHODS: An anonymous on-line questionnaire was developed within the Vaccine Committee of Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (SIAIP) and spontaneously completed by 231 Pediatricians and Pediatric Nurses (PN). RESULTS: An accurate vaccine education was reported by 70% of pediatricians and 13% of PN but 11% of pediatricians versus 26% of PN consult social media instead of scientific sources for their vaccine update. The investigation on the pHCPs attitudes to vaccination in a personal and family setting highlights poor adherence to vaccinations. Only 63% of pediatricians versus 16% of PN (p < 0.0001) annually received the Flu vaccine. In their family setting 93% of pediatricians versus 51% of PN recommended all vaccinations (p < 0.0001). Anti-flu, anti-rotavirus, anti-zoster and anti-pneumococcal vaccines were not regularly recommended by all pHCPs due to doubts of uselessness (55% of pediatricians versus 40% of PN) and preference for "natural immunity" (44% of pediatricians versus 40% of PN). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that pHCPs' attitude and confidence in regards to vaccines remain suboptimal. Current COVID-19 pandemic and the rapid development of vaccines could increase vaccine hesitancy. Due to the documented pHCPs' influence in the parental decision, educational interventions are needed to improve their level of knowledge and counselling skills in order to address parental vaccine hesitancy and to maintain continuity of immunization services.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pediatric Nursing , Pediatricians/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal
10.
Pediatr Res ; 91(1): 143-148, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore factors contributing to compassion fatigue (CF), burnout (BO), and compassion satisfaction (CS) during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 pandemic in pediatric subspecialists. METHODS: The Compassion Fatigue and Satisfaction Self-Test (CFST) and a questionnaire of personal/professional characteristics were distributed electronically to pediatric subspecialists. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in pre- and early-pandemic CF, BO, and CS scores. Nearly 40% of respondents felt their contributions to the pandemic were not valued by their institutions. Higher CF scores were significantly associated with: higher BO score; "I have put myself at increased risk through my work"; working in one's specialty >50% of time; distress about mental health and/or future uncertainty. Higher BO scores were significantly associated with: higher CF score; "Self-care is not a priority"; emotional depletion. Higher CS scores were significantly associated with: "My institution values my contribution to the COVID-19 crisis"; workplace debriefs; pet therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has only increased the need for physicians to receive social/emotional support from their institution and to feel their workplace contributions are valued. Successful pre-pandemic workplace interventions may not adequately support physicians during the pandemic. Further study is needed to identify supports that best counter the pandemic's unprecedented challenges. IMPACT: The sentiment "My institution has valued my contribution to the Covid-19 crisis" was the only significant factor associated with lower BO scores and was also associated with higher CS scores in pediatric subspecialists. This study is the first comparison of pre- and early-pandemic CF, BO, and CS scores in a national cohort of pediatric subspecialists. When considering interventions to promote CS and mitigate CF and BO for pediatric subspecialists during and after the pandemic, institutional leadership must offer wellness programming focused on social/emotional supports and prioritize a culture that explicitly recognizes and values every physician's contributions.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Pediatricians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pediatrics/classification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
12.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 31(6): 720-729, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric anesthesiology has been greatly impacted by COVID-19 in the delivery of care to patients and to the individual providers. With this study, we sought to survey pediatric centers and highlight the variations in care related to perioperative medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the availability of protective equipment, the practice of pediatric anesthesia, and economic impact. AIM: The aim of the survey was to determine how COVID-19 directly impacted pediatric anesthesia practices during the study period. METHODS: A survey concerning four major domains (testing, safety, clinical management/policy, economics) was developed. It was pilot tested for clarity and content by members of the Pediatric Anesthesia COVID-19 Collaborative. The survey was administered by email to all Pediatric Anesthesia COVID-19 Collaborative members on September 1, 2020. Respondents had six weeks to complete the survey and were instructed to answer the questions based on their institution's practice during September 1 - October 13, 2020. RESULTS: Sixty-three institutions (100% response rate) participated in the COVID-19 Pediatric Anesthesia Survey. Forty-one hospitals (65%) were from the United States, and 35% included other countries. N95 masks were available to anesthesia teams at 91% of institutions (n = 57) (95% CI: 80%-96%). COVID-19 testing criteria of anesthesia staff and guidelines to return to work varied by institution. Structured simulation training aimed at improving COVID-19 safety and patient care occurred at 62% of institutions (n = 39). Pediatric anesthesiologists were economically affected by a reduction in their employer benefits and restriction of travel due to employer imposed quarantine regulations. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the testing, safety, clinical management, and economics of pediatric anesthesia practice. Further investigation into the long-term consequences for the specialty is indicated.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Anesthesiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pediatricians/psychology , Pediatrics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
13.
Pediatr Res ; 90(4): 738-743, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038204

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic will leave an indelible mark on the careers of current medical trainees. Given the disruptions to medical education, economic impact on institutions, and the uncertainties around future job prospects, trainees are facing unprecedented challenges. This situation is especially concerning for futures of pediatric physician-scientist trainees, where concerns regarding maintaining the pipeline were well documented prior to the emergence of COVID-19. In this Perspectives article, we leverage the unique expertise of our workgroup to address concerns of physician-scientist trainees and to provide suggestions on how to navigate career trajectories in the post-COVID-19 era. We identified and addressed four major areas of concern: lack of in-person conferences and the associated decrease access to mentors and networking activities, decreased academic productivity, diminished job prospects, and mental health challenges. We also suggest actions for trainees, mentors and educational leaders, and institutions to help support trainees during the pandemic, with a goal of maintaining the pediatric physician-scientist pipeline.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/education , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Mentors , Pediatricians/education , Pediatrics/education , Career Mobility , Efficiency , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Mental Health , Pediatricians/psychology , Societies, Medical
15.
Isr J Health Policy Res ; 9(1): 53, 2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883598

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facing the global health crisis of COVID-19, health systems are increasingly supporting the use of telemedicine in ambulatory care settings. It is not clear whether the increased use of telemedicine will persist after the pandemic has resolved. The aims of this study were to assess the use of telemedicine by Israeli pediatricians before and during the first lockdown phase of the pandemic, and to elucidate how they foresee telemedicine as a medium of medical practice in the post-pandemic era. METHODS: A web-based survey was distributed among Israeli pediatricians in May 2020, soon after the end of first lockdown was announced. The survey assessed the frequency of telemedicine use as well as its influence on clinical decision making before and during the first COVID-19 lockdown, using two hypothetical clinical scenarios. The same scenarios were also used to assess how the pediatricians foresaw telemedicine in the post-pandemic period. In addition, administrative data from Maccabi on telemedicine use before, during and after the first lockdown were retrieved and analyzed. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-nine pediatricians responded to the survey (response rate = 40%). The percentage of respondents who reported daily use of text messages, pictures and videoconferencing increased from 24, 15 and 1% before COVID-19 to 40, 40 and 12% during the lockdown, respectively (p < 0.05). After the pandemic, projected use of text messages and pictures/videoclips was expected to decrease to 27 and 26% of respondents, respectively (p < 0.05), but pictures/videoclips were expected to increase from 15% of respondents before to 26% of respondents after (p < 0.05). The reported high likelihood of treating suspected pneumonia or prescribing antibiotics for suspected otitis media via telemedicine was expected to decrease from 20% of respondents during the COVID-19 lockdown to 6%% of respondents after (p < 0.05), and from 14% of respondents during the lockdown to 3% of respondents after, respectively. (p < 0.05). Maccabi administrative data indicated that during the lockdown, there was an increase in phone visits and a decrease in in-person visits compared to the pre-lockdown levels of use. One month after the end of the first lock-down there was a partial return to baseline levels of in-person visits and a sustained increase in phone visits. Phone visits accounted for 0% of pediatrician visits before the first lockdown, 17% of them during the lockdown, and 19% of them 1 month after the lockdown relaxation. CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates that use of telemedicine technologies by primary care pediatricians increased substantially during the first COVID-19 lockdown. The study also found that pediatricians expected that use levels will recede after the pandemic. As the pandemic continues and evolves, it will be important to continue to monitor the level of telemedicine use as well as expectations regarding post-pandemic use levels.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pediatricians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pediatricians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Policy , Quarantine
16.
Arch Pediatr ; 27(8): 423-427, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-785151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has imposed many challenges on health systems. The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the clinical activity of pediatricians. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional and descriptive online survey among pediatricians practicing in Cameroon. Data were collected through an anonymous pre-tested Google Form®. RESULTS: Among the 118 pediatricians eligible for the survey, 101 responded (85.6%), of whom 61.2% were women. The pediatric outpatient consultations dropped significantly from 60.4% of pediatricians seeing more than 30 patients per week before the pandemic to 9.9% during the pandemic (P<0.000). According to the occupancy rate of hospitalisation beds, 45.5% of pediatricians reported having 76-100% of pediatric hospitalisation beds occupied per week before the pandemic but no pediatrician reported a similar rate during the pandemic (P<0.000). There was a significant increase in the use of telehealth, ranging from no pediatrician using telehealth "very frequently" before the pandemic to 23.8% using it during the pandemic (P<0.000). Most of the pediatricians had at their disposal surgical masks (96%), care gloves (80.2%), hydroalcoholic gel (99.0%), and soap and water (86.1%). For the management of children, 90.1% and 71.3% of pediatricians experienced difficulties accessing COVID-19 PCR and chloroquine, respectively, and 74.3% declared difficulties for proper isolation of patients. More than half (65.3%) of the pediatricians interviewed were "very afraid" or "extremely afraid" of being infected with SARS-Cov-2, respectively 45.5% and 19.8%. The most frequent reasons included fear of infecting their relatives (85.1%) and of developing a severe form of the disease (43.6%). The reluctance to consult health services expressed by the parents was due to: fear of being infected when leaving their home and especially in the health facility (96%), strict compliance with confinement (30.7%), and financial difficulties of families (13.9%). CONCLUSION: This work highlights the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the clinical activity of Cameroonian pediatricians. Since the beginning of the pandemic, there has been a significant drop in the use of health facilities, which probably has a negative impact on children's overall level of health. Although the preventive measures explain this drop in attendance at health facilities, the parents' fear of being infected when leaving the house was the predominant reason likely to explain this drop in attendance at health facilities. This could constitute an axis for developing messages to parents to encourage a gradual return to child health services.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pediatricians/psychology , Pediatrics/trends , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Adult , COVID-19 , Cameroon , Child , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Professional-Family Relations , Telemedicine
17.
Eur J Pediatr ; 180(1): 201-206, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641137

ABSTRACT

The current outbreak of COVID-19 raging globally is taking a heavy toll on the adult population, with a rapidly growing number of newly infected and critically ill patients. However, to date, mortality rate among children is low as they mostly suffer from a mild disease. Yet, other more routinely encountered childhood diseases do not stand still and continue to be the main share of pediatricians' everyday challenges. Here we describe a case series of routinely seen pediatric diseases with delayed diagnosis due to different aspects of what we call "Corona-phobia". These cases were easily collected within a 1-week period which implies that this is a more widespread phenomenon.In conclusion, this raises the possibility that measures taken to mitigate this pandemic may be more damaging to children overall than the virus itself. We believe that pediatricians as well as policy makers should take this important aspect into consideration. What is Known: • COVID-19 manifests as a mild disease in most children; however, children are an important reservoir and may become spreaders of the disease. • Social distancing and isolation are important tools in mitigating COVID-19 transmission. What is New: • This case series describes 7 cases with delayed diagnosis of every-day pediatric diseases that were not caused by COVID-19 but were highly influenced by different aspects of "Corona-phobia". • Our objective is to highlight the possibility that measures taken to mitigate this pandemic may lead to a substantial delay in the diagnosis of other non-COVID-19 related diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Pandemics , Pediatricians/psychology , Phobic Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant, Newborn , Male , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/psychology
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