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1.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 106, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric integrative medicine, combining conventional and complementary medical approaches for children and adolescents, is an integral part of the health care system in Switzerland. However, there is still a lack of complementary and integrative medicine topics in training and continuing educational programs. For the first time on a national level, the 2021 annual conference of the Swiss Society of Pediatrics was entirely dedicated to the topic of integrative medicine. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional online survey, this study investigated congress participants' evaluation and feedback with the aim to assess whether the program had met their objectives and to get empirical data on their attitude, expectations and needs regarding pediatric complementary and integrative medicine. Descriptive methods were used to present the results. RESULTS: Among 632 participants of the conference, 228 completed the evaluation form (response rate 36%). The overall feedback about the congress and the main theme of pediatric integrative medicine was clearly positive. The majority of respondents had achieved their educational objectives including complementary and integrative medicine issues. 82% were motivated to learn more about complementary and integrative medicine and 66% were stimulated to integrate complementary therapies into their professional practice. CONCLUSION: This study from Switzerland confirms the interest in integrative medicine among pediatricians and supports the need for pre- and postgraduate pediatric training on topics related to complementary and integrative medicine. Developing and adapting training and continuing medical education based on evaluations of participant feedback can promote professional development and improve patient care for the benefit of physicians and patients.


Subject(s)
Integrative Medicine , Pediatrics , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Integrative Medicine/education , Pediatrics/education , Switzerland
2.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(3): 213-223, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775070

ABSTRACT

Access to paediatric neurology care is complex, resulting in significant wait times and negative patient outcomes. The goal of the American Academy of Pediatrics National Coordinating Center for Epilepsy's project, Access Improvement and Management of Epilepsy with Telehealth (AIM-ET), was to identify access and management challenges in the deployment of telehealth technology. AIM-ET organised four paediatric neurology teams to partner with primary-care providers (PCP) and their multidisciplinary teams. Telehealth visits were conducted for paediatric epilepsy patients. A post-visit survey assessed access and satisfaction with the telehealth visit compared to an in-person visit. Pre/post surveys completed by PCPs and neurologists captured telehealth visit feasibility, functionality and provider satisfaction. A provider focus group assessed facilitators and barriers to telehealth. Sixty-one unique patients completed 75 telehealth visits. Paired t-test analysis demonstrated that telehealth enhanced access to epilepsy care. It reduced self-reported out-of-pocket costs (p<0.001), missed school hours (p<0.001) and missed work hours (p<0.001), with 94% equal parent/caregiver satisfaction. Focus groups indicated developing and maintaining partnerships, institutional infrastructure and education as facilitators and barriers to telehealth. Telehealth shortened travelling distance, reduced expenses and time missed from school and work. Further, it provides significant opportunity in an era when coronavirus disease 2019 limits in-person clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Neurology , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , Child , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Telemedicine/methods
3.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 856958, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771035

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous reports suggest that the Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic might have affected incidences of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and new diagnoses of type 1 diabetes. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the risk of DKA, including severe DKA, during the COVID-19 pandemic versus the prior-to-COVID-19 period among pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: PubMed and EMBASE were searched for observational studies investigating the risk of DKA among pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic and the prior-to-COVID-19 period. A random meta-analysis model was performed to estimate the relative risk of DKA during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to before the pandemic. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on the type 1 diabetes status, established or newly diagnosed. In addition, sensitivity analysis was conducted for studies that reported results from adjusted analysis for potential confounders using fixed effect model. Results: A total of 20 observational studies reported the risk of DKA, of which 18 reported the risk of severe DKA. The risks of DKA and severe DKA were 35% (RR 1.35, 95%CI 1.2-1.53, I 2 = 71%) and 76% (RR 1.76, 95%CI 1.33-2.33, I 2 = 44%) higher in the during-COVID-19 group compared to the prior-to-COVID-19 group, respectively. Among patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, the risk of DKA was 44% higher for the during-COVID-19 group compared to the prior-to-COVID-19 group (RR 1.44, 95%CI 1.26-1.65; I 2 = 64%). Only two studies reported the risk of DKA among patients with established type 1 diabetes and the cumulative risk was not statistically significant. In the sensitivity analysis, four studies reported an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of the risk of DKA during COVID-19 compared to the prior-to-COVID-19 period. The fixed estimate from the meta-analysis found an increase in the risk of DKA in the during-COVID-19 group compared to the prior-to-COVID-19 group (aOR 2.04, 95%CI 1.66-2.50). Conclusions: This study showed that DKA risk, especially the risk of severe DKA, has increased significantly during the pandemic. Healthcare systems must be aware and prepared for such an increase in DKA cases and take all necessary measures to prevent future spikes during the pandemic. Systematic Review Registration: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=272775, identifier PROSPERO [CRD42021272775].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Diabetic Ketoacidosis , Pediatrics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/diagnosis , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 798005, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731866

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in 2019 and has since caused a global pandemic. Since its emergence, COVID-19 has hugely impacted healthcare, including pediatrics. This study aimed to explore the current status and hotspots of pediatric COVID-19 research using bibliometric analysis. Methods: The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science core collection database was searched for articles on pediatric COVID-19 to identify original articles that met the criteria. The retrieval period ranged from the creation of the database to September 20, 2021. A total of 3,561 original articles written in English were selected to obtain data, such as author names, titles, source publications, number of citations, author affiliations, and countries where the studies were conducted. Microsoft Excel (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) was used to create charts related to countries, authors, and institutions. VOSviewer (Center for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden, The Netherlands) was used to create visual network diagrams of keyword, author, and country co-occurrence. Results: We screened 3,561 publications with a total citation frequency of 30,528. The United States had the most published articles (1188 articles) and contributed the most with author co-occurrences. The author with the most published articles was Villani from the University of Padua, Italy. He also contributed the most co-authored articles. The most productive institution was Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. The institution with the most frequently cited published articles was Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. The United States cooperated most with other countries. Research hotspots were divided into two clusters: social research and clinical research. Besides COVID-19 and children, the most frequent keywords were pandemic (251 times), mental health (187 times), health (172 times), impact (148 times), and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) (144 times). Conclusion: Pediatric COVID-19 has attracted considerable attention worldwide, leading to a considerable number of articles published over the past 2 years. The United States, China, and Italy have leading roles in pediatric COVID-19 research. The new research hotspot is gradually shifting from COVID-19 and its related clinical studies to studies of its psychological and social impacts on children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics , Bibliometrics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , China/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , United States/epidemiology
5.
JAMA Pediatr ; 176(2): 119-120, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718216
6.
Pediatrics ; 149(3)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714832

ABSTRACT

The use of telehealth technology to connect with patients has expanded significantly over the past several years, particularly in response to the global coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. This technical report describes the present state of telehealth and its current and potential applications. Telehealth has the potential to transform the way care is delivered to pediatric patients, expanding access to pediatric care across geographic distances, leveraging the pediatric workforce for care delivery, and improving disparities in access to care. However, implementation will require significant efforts to address the digital divide to ensure that telehealth does not inadvertently exacerbate inequities in care. The medical home model will continue to evolve to use telehealth to provide high-quality care for children, particularly for children and youth with special health care needs, in accordance with current and evolving quality standards. Research and metric development are critical for the development of evidence-based best practices and policies in these new models of care. Finally, as pediatric care transitions from traditional fee-for-service payment to alternative payment methods, telehealth offers unique opportunities to establish value-based population health models that are financed in a sustainable manner.


Subject(s)
Health Care Costs , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Quality of Health Care/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Patient-Centered Care/economics , Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration , Pediatrics/economics , Pediatrics/standards , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/standards , United States
7.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(3S): S3-S9, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1679889

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The growth of antimicrobial resistance worldwide has led to increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) and infection prevention and control (IPC) measures, although primarily in high-income countries (HIC). We aimed to compare pediatric AMS and IPC resources/activities between low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and HIC and to determine the barriers and priorities for AMS and IPC in LMIC as assessed by clinicians in those settings. METHODS: An online questionnaire was distributed to clinicians working in HIC and LMIC healthcare facilities in 2020. RESULTS: Participants were from 135 healthcare settings in 39 LMIC and 27 HIC. Formal AMS and IPC programs were less frequent in LMIC than HIC settings (AMS 42% versus 76% and IPC 58% versus 89%). Only 47% of LMIC facilities conducted audits of antibiotic use for pediatric patients, with less reliable availability of World Health Organization Access list antibiotics (29% of LMIC facilities). Hand hygiene promotion was the most common IPC intervention in both LMIC and HIC settings (82% versus 91%), although LMIC hospitals had more limited access to reliable water supply for handwashing and antiseptic hand rub. The greatest perceived barrier to pediatric AMS and IPC in both LMIC and HIC was lack of education: only 17% of LMIC settings had regular/required education on antimicrobial prescribing and only 25% on IPC. CONCLUSIONS: Marked differences exist in availability of AMS and IPC resources in LMIC as compared with HIC. A collaborative international approach is urgently needed to combat antimicrobial resistance, using targeted strategies that address the imbalance in global AMS and IPC resource availability and activities.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship/standards , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Infection Control/methods , Pediatrics/standards , Developed Countries , Developing Countries , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Health Resources/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28884, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713780

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study analyzed the changes in the number of outpatients and disease presentation during the entirety of 2020, the period of COVID-19 pandemic.The average annual number of outpatient visits between 2017 and 2019 (before COVID-19) and the total number of outpatient visits in 2020 (COVID-19 period) were compared. Diagnostic codes were identified during 2 periods to analyze changes in the number of outpatient visits according to disease and month.The average annual number of outpatient visits was 47,105 before, and 40,786 during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a decrease of 13.4%. The number of outpatient visits in internal medicine decreased by 10.2% during the COVID-19 pandemic and tended to rebound during the second half of the year. However, the number of outpatient visits in the pediatric department decreased by 37.5% overall throughout the COVID-19 period and continued to decline in the second half of the year. The number of outpatients with infectious diseases decreased significantly (35.9%) compared to noninfectious diseases (cancer, 5.0%; circulatory disease, 4.1%). In addition, the number of outpatient visits due to viral diseases continued to decline, while the incidence of bacterial diseases increased rapidly in the second half of the year.This study confirmed that the number of outpatient visits due to bacterial or viral infections decreased throughout the COVID-19 crisis. Therefore, expanding public health and telemedicine services is necessary to prevent secondary health problems caused by essential medical use restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internal Medicine/organization & administration , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Internal Medicine/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Pediatrics/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e14, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691374

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and impact of having paediatric clinicians working in the Clinical Assessment Services (CAS) within NHS 111, a national telephone advice service. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Six NHS 111 providers across England with CAS where volunteer paediatric clinicians (doctors and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs)) worked between May and December 2020. A data reporting framework was used to compare the outcomes of calls taken by paediatric vs non-paediatric clinicians. PATIENTS: Under 16-year-olds prompting calls to NHS 111 over the study period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The disposition (final outcome of calls) taken by paediatric versus non-paediatric clinicians, paediatric clinicians' and patient experience. RESULTS: 70 paediatric clinicians (66 doctors and 4 ANPs) worked flexible shifts in six NHS 111 providers' CAS over the study period: 2535 calls for under 16-year-olds were taken by paediatric clinicians and 137 008 by non-paediatric clinicians. Overall, disposition rates differed significantly between the calls taken by paediatric versus (vs) non-paediatric clinicians: 69% vs 43% were advised on self-care only, 13% vs 18% to attend emergency departments (EDs), 13% vs 29% to attend primary care, 1% vs 4% to receive an urgent ambulance call out and 4% vs 6% referred to another health service, respectively. When compared with recent (all age) national whole data sets, the feedback from calls taken by paediatricians noted a greater proportion of patients/carers reporting that their problem was fully resolved (92% vs 27%). CONCLUSIONS: Introducing paediatric specialists into NHS 111 CAS is likely to increase self-care dispositions, and reduce onward referrals to primary care, ED and ambulances. Future work will evaluate the impact of a national paediatric clinical assessment service to which specific case types are streamed.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Pediatrics/methods , Remote Consultation/methods , Telephone , Adolescent , Ambulances/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , England , Humans , Physicians , Pilot Projects , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , State Medicine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Triage/methods
10.
MedUNAB ; 24(3): 335-339, 202112.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1687828

ABSTRACT

A lo largo de la historia se han documentado diferentes brotes epidémicos tales como la peste bubónica, la gripe española, la influenza porcina, el ébola, entre otras enfermedades que azotaron a todo el mundo y generaron un alto impacto desde las perspectivas económica, política y de salud. Todo esto ha conllevado a la creación de nuevas políticas públicas que contribuyen al control de la propagación de estas patologías (1), las cuales afectan a las comunidades sin discriminación de edad, sexo o grupo étnico. Por este motivo es importante tener en cuenta el papel que ha tenido el COVID-19 en nuestra sociedad desde el punto de vista pediátrico. Antes de empezar a tocar temas claves en esta población, es importante tener conocimiento acerca de esta patología y el desarrollo que tuvo a nivel mundial y nacional. El COVID-19, se encuentra clasificado en el grupo de virus de la familia Coronaviridae, en la subfamilia Orthocoronavirinae, dentro de los que destacan cuatro géneros identificados como Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus, Gammacoronavirus y Deltacoronavirus. Dentro de este grupo se ha demostrado que los Alfacoronavirus y Betacoronavirus son responsables de infección en mamíferos, de los cuales seis subtipos han sido descritos como causantes de la enfermedad en humanos: HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43 y HKU1 (2). El pasado 31 de diciembre de 2019 se conoció un primer reporte de casos de neumonía de origen desconocido en Wuhan, provincia de Hubei, China. Se reportaron un total de 27 casos, aparentemente causados por un nuevo tipo de coronavirus asociado al consumo de animales exóticos en un mercado al aire libre; se produjeron sospechas alrededor de una posible infección transmitida desde los murciélagos (Chiroptera, mamíferos placentarios) a un mamífero intermediario, como el pangolín (Pholidota, mamíferos placentarios), y de ahí hasta llegar a los humanos, en un proceso denominado desbordamiento zoonótico (3).


Throughout history, different epidemic outbreaks have been documented, such as the bubonic plague, the Spanish flu, swine flu, Ebola, amongst other diseases that hit the whole world and generated a high impact from economic, political, and health perspectives. All of this has led to the creation of new public policies that contribute to the control of the spread of these pathologies, which affect communities regardless of age, sex, or ethnic group. For this reason, it is important to bear in mind the role that COVID-19 has had in our society from a pediatric viewpoint. Before addressing key matters in this population, we need knowledge on this pathology and its development on a national and global level. COVID-19 is classified in the Coronaviridae family virus group, in the Orthocoronavirinae sub-family, within which four genres stand out, identified as Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus, Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus. Within this group, it has been shown that Alfacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus are responsible for infection in mammals, of which six subtypes have been described as roots of the disease in humans: HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43 and HKU1 (2).


Ao longo da história, diferentes surtos epidémicos foram documentados, tais como peste bubónica, gripe espanhola, gripe suína, ebola, entre outras doenças que atingiram o mundo todo e geraram um grande impacto do ponto de vista económico, político e sanitário. Tudo isso tem levado à criação de novas políticas públicas que contribuem para o controle da disseminação dessas patologias (1), que afetam as comunidades sem discriminação de idade, sexo ou etnia. Por isso, é importante levar em consideração o papel que a COVID-19 tem desempenhado em nossa sociedade do ponto de vista pediátrico. Antes de começar a abordar questões principais nesta população, é importante conhecer essa patologia e seu desenvolvimento em nível global e nacional. O COVID-19 está classificado no grupo de vírus da família Coronaviridae, da subfamília Orthocoronavirinae, onde se destacam quatro gêneros identificados como Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus, Gammacoronavirus e Deltacoronavirus. Dentro deste grupo, foi demonstrado que os Alphacoronavírus e Betacoronavírus são responsáveis pela infecção em mamíferos, dos quais seis subtipos foram descritos como causadores de doenças em humanos: HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43 e HKU1 (2).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pediatrics , Stress, Psychological , Health Evaluation , Social Determinants of Health
11.
MEDICC Rev ; 24(1): 14-18, 2022 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687933

ABSTRACT

Cuba's decision in September 2021 to launch a massive vaccination campaign against COVID-19 for children as young as two years old turned heads around the world-of clinicians, immunologists, public health experts, governments and regulatory authorities alike. Since then-and just as pediatric COVID-19 hospitalizations reached record numbers globally-some two million Cuban children and adolescents have received the Cuban Soberana vaccines (1.7 million, or 81.3% of that population through December 16, 2021).[1] Why did Cuban health authorities decide to vaccinate children? What clinical trials provided the evidence for such a course of action, especially for the youngest? And what have been the results thus far? To answer these and other questions, MEDICC Review spoke with Dr Rinaldo Puga, principal investigator for the completed phase 1/2 clinical trials of the Finlay Vaccine Institute's Soberana 02 and Soberana Plus vaccines in pediatric ages. Dr Puga's 30 years as a practicing pediatrician have been accompanied by teaching and research, the latter earning him awards from the Cuban Academy of Sciences, among others. He is currently chief of pediatrics and chair of the Scientific Council at the Cira García Clinic in Havana, which granted him leave to lead the pediatric vaccine trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Pediatrics , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cuba , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 781562, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686565

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: COVID-19 vaccination has been in the spotlight for almost a year now, both within the scientific community and in the general population. The issue of healthcare workers' (HCWs) hesitancy is particularly salient, given that they are at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19. Not only could unvaccinated HCW spread the disease, but HCWs are also critical messengers in building confidence towards COVID-19 vaccines. The goal of this study was to examine the perception of COVID-19 risk and of its vaccine acceptance among employees (i.e., HCW plus administrative staff) in the Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the University Hospitals of Geneva, for the purpose of drawing lessons on the determinants of vaccination morale. Methods: We conducted an anonymous online survey comparing vaccination attitudes among vaccinated and unvaccinated workers in June 2021. It included questions on perception of COVID-19 risks and COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccination was not mandatory in our institution but was strongly recommended. Results: In June 2021, 66% of the 1,800 employees of our department had received two doses of COVID-19 vaccine by the time of the survey. Among the employees, 776 participated (43%) to the survey, and among them 684 (88%) had chosen to be vaccinated. Participants working for longer in a hospital, with a chronic disease and a household contact with chronic disease were more likely to be vaccinated. Doctors were twice as likely to be vaccinated than nurses. Among unvaccinated hospital employees, 48 (52%) responded that they would not change their mind. Further, 35 (38%) were not feeling in danger of contracting severe COVID-19, and 32 (35%) had fears about possible side effects of COVID-19 vaccines that they wanted to discuss with a specialist. Conclusion: Our study indicates that, while two-third of the employees had been vaccinated, quite many were still hesitant. The unvaccinated explained their choice by not feeling at risk of complicated COVID-19, and because of fear of possible side effects associated with the vaccine. Investments in COVID-19 vaccine education is a critical component for increasing vaccine acceptance among the unvaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Pediatrics , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Hospitals, University , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
13.
Clin Nutr ; 41(3): 661-672, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The Remote Malnutrition Application (R-MAPP) was developed during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide support for health care professionals (HCPs) working in the community to complete remote nutritional assessments, and provide practical guidance for nutritional care. The aim of this study was to modify the R-MAPP into a version suitable for children, Pediatric Remote Malnutrition Application (Pedi-R-MAPP), and provide a structured approach to completing a nutrition focused assessment as part of a technology enabled care service (TECS) consultation. METHODS: A ten-step process was completed: 1) permission to modify adult R-MAPP, 2) literature search to inform the Pedi-R-MAPP content, 3) Pedi-R-MAPP draft, 4) international survey of HCP practice using TECS, 5) nutrition experts invited to participate in a modified Delphi process, 6) first stakeholder meeting to agree purpose/draft of the tool, 7) round-one online survey, 8) statements with consensus removed from survey, 9) round-two online survey for statements with no consensus and 10) second stakeholder meeting with finalisation of the Pedi-R-MAPP nutrition awareness tool. RESULTS: The international survey completed by 463 HCPs, 55% paediatricians, 38% dietitians, 7% nurses/others. When HCPs were asked to look back over the last 12 months, dietitians (n = 110) reported that 5.7 ± 10.6 out of every 10 appointments were completed in person; compared to paediatricians (n = 182) who reported 7.5 ± 7.0 out of every 10 appointments to be in person (p < 0.0001), with the remainder completed as TECS consultations. Overall, 74 articles were identified and used to develop the Pedi-R-MAPP which included colour-coded advice using a traffic light system; green, amber, red and purple. Eighteen participants agreed to participate in the Delphi consensus and completed both rounds of the modified Delphi survey. Agreement was reached at the first meeting on the purpose and draft sections of the proposed tool. In round-one of the online survey, 86% (n = 89/104) of statements reached consensus, whereas in round-two 12.5% (n = 13/104) of statements reached no consensus. At the second expert meeting, contested statements were discussed until agreement was reached and the Pedi-R-MAPP could be finalised. CONCLUSION: The Pedi-R-MAPP nutrition awareness tool was developed using a modified Delphi consensus. This tool aims to support the technological transformation fast-tracked by the COVID-19 pandemic by providing a structured approach to completing a remote nutrition focused assessment, as well as identifying the frequency of follow up along with those children who may require in-person assessment.


Subject(s)
Child Health , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Nutrition Assessment , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Dietetics/instrumentation , Dietetics/methods , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Male , Nutritional Status , Pediatrics/instrumentation , Pediatrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Arch. med ; 21(1): 257-265, 2021/01/03.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1677829

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: el objetivo de este estudio fue describir los casos de pacientes con dolor abdominal y diagnóstico confirmado de COVID-19. En países de Latinoamérica la pandemia ha tenido un gran impacto por el alto índice de mortalidad. Ecuador es el quinto país más afectado en la región en número de casos confirmados con una tasa de 223 fallecidos por cada millón de habitantes, ubicándose en el primer lugar de letalidad. En la población pediátrica el comportamiento del COVID-19 sigue siendo inespecífico. Materiales y métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo y retrospectivo en el cual se incluyó a todos los pacientes menores de 18 años exceptuando neonatos, que ingresaron por dolor abdominal a un hospital pediátrico de la ciudad de Guayaquil entre los meses de abril y mayo de 2020 y obtuvieron diagnóstico confirmado COVID-19. Resultados: fueron incluidos 30 pacientes con diagnóstico confirmado de COVID-19 y dolor abdominal. La edad promedio fue 8,46 años a predomino del sexo masculino (70%). En la valoración del dolor 19 (63%) tuvieron un EVA moderado-severo y 11 (37%) EVA leve. 7 pacientes (23.33%) requirieron intervención quirúrgica, 21 (70%) necesitaron de unidad de cuidados críticos, y 1 (3.33%) falleció.Conclusiones: el dolor abdominal constituye un desafío diagnóstico en este tiempo de pandemia y debería ser considerado dentro de las posibles manifestaciones clínicas de COVID-19 en la población pediátrica..Au


Objective: the objective of this study was to describe the cases of paediatric patients with abdominal pain and confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. In Latin American countries the pandemic has had a major impact from the high mortality rate. Ecuador is the fifth most affected country with a rate of 223 deaths per million inhabitants, ranking at the top of the fatality. In the paediatric population, the behavior of COVID-19 remains nonspecific. Materials and methods: an observational, descriptive and retrospective study was conducted, in which patients under the age of 18 were included except for newborns, admitted by abdominal pain and who obtained a confirmed diagnosis COVID-19. Results: 30 patients with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 and abdominal pain were included. The average age was 8.46 years at the predomin of the male sex (70%). In the pain assessment 19 (63%) had a moderate-severe EVA and 11 (37%) Mild EVA. 7 (23.33%) required surgery, 21 (70%) needed a critical care unit, and 1 (3.33%) Died. Conclusions: abdominal pain is a diagnostic challenge in this time of pandemic and should be considered within the possible clinical manifestations of COVID-19 in the paediatric population..Au


Subject(s)
Child , Pediatrics , Abdominal Pain , Coronavirus Infections
18.
Pediatrics ; 149(2)2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662456

ABSTRACT

Pediatric primary health care (PPHC) is of principal importance to the health and development of all children, helping them reach their true potential. Pediatricians, as the clinicians most intensively trained and experienced in child health, are the natural leaders of PPHC within the context of the medical home. Given the rapidly evolving models of pediatric health care delivery, including the explosion of telehealth in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, pediatricians, together with their representative national organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), are the most capable clinicians to guide policy innovations on both the local and national stage.


Subject(s)
Pediatrics , Physician's Role , Primary Health Care , Child Health , Health Policy , Humans , Pediatricians , Policy Making , United States
19.
Pediatrics ; 149(2)2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662454

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: With the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, pediatric ambulatory encounter volume and antibiotic prescribing both decreased; however, the durability of these reductions in pediatric primary care in the United States has not been assessed. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational study to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated public health measures on antibiotic prescribing in 27 pediatric primary care practices. Encounters from January 1, 2018, through June 30, 2021, were included. The primary outcome was monthly antibiotic prescriptions per 1000 patients. Interrupted time series analysis was performed. RESULTS: There were 69 327 total antibiotic prescriptions from April through December in 2019 and 18 935 antibiotic prescriptions during the same months in 2020, a 72.7% reduction. The reduction in prescriptions at visits for respiratory tract infection (RTI) accounted for 87.3% of this decrease. Using interrupted time series analysis, overall antibiotic prescriptions decreased from 31.6 to 6.4 prescriptions per 1000 patients in April 2020 (difference of -25.2 prescriptions per 1000 patients; 95% CI: -32.9 to -17.5). This was followed by a nonsignificant monthly increase in antibiotic prescriptions, with prescribing beginning to rebound from April to June 2021. Encounter volume also immediately decreased, and while overall encounter volume quickly started to recover, RTI encounter volume returned more slowly. CONCLUSIONS: Reductions in antibiotic prescribing in pediatric primary care during the COVID-19 pandemic were sustained, only beginning to rise in 2021, primarily driven by reductions in RTI encounters. Reductions in viral RTI transmission likely played a substantial role in reduced RTI visits and antibiotic prescriptions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care , Child , Female , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Male , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
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