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1.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 106, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric integrative medicine, combining conventional and complementary medical approaches for children and adolescents, is an integral part of the health care system in Switzerland. However, there is still a lack of complementary and integrative medicine topics in training and continuing educational programs. For the first time on a national level, the 2021 annual conference of the Swiss Society of Pediatrics was entirely dedicated to the topic of integrative medicine. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional online survey, this study investigated congress participants' evaluation and feedback with the aim to assess whether the program had met their objectives and to get empirical data on their attitude, expectations and needs regarding pediatric complementary and integrative medicine. Descriptive methods were used to present the results. RESULTS: Among 632 participants of the conference, 228 completed the evaluation form (response rate 36%). The overall feedback about the congress and the main theme of pediatric integrative medicine was clearly positive. The majority of respondents had achieved their educational objectives including complementary and integrative medicine issues. 82% were motivated to learn more about complementary and integrative medicine and 66% were stimulated to integrate complementary therapies into their professional practice. CONCLUSION: This study from Switzerland confirms the interest in integrative medicine among pediatricians and supports the need for pre- and postgraduate pediatric training on topics related to complementary and integrative medicine. Developing and adapting training and continuing medical education based on evaluations of participant feedback can promote professional development and improve patient care for the benefit of physicians and patients.


Subject(s)
Integrative Medicine , Pediatrics , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Integrative Medicine/education , Pediatrics/education , Switzerland
2.
Pediatrics ; 149(1)2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626689

ABSTRACT

A physician workforce that reflects the patient population is associated with improved patient outcomes and promotes health equity. Notwithstanding, racial and ethnic disparities persist within US medical schools, making some individuals underrepresented in medicine (URM). We sought to increase the percentage of URM residents who matched into our pediatric residency programs from a baseline of 5% to 35% to achieve demographic parity with our patients. We developed a multifaceted approach using multiple iterative tests of change, with the primary strategy being increased visibility of URM trainees and faculty to residency applicants. Strategies included applicant interviews with URM faculty, interview dinners with URM residents, visibility at academic conferences for URM trainees, development of targeted marketing materials, and a visiting student program supported by networking with URM residents. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of matched residents in the categorical pediatrics, child neurology, and medical genetics training programs who identified as URM. The percentage of URM residents increased to 16% (6 of 37) in 2018, 26% (11 of 43) in 2019, 19% (8 of 43) in 2020, and 21% (9 of 43) in 2021 (a four-year average of 22% URM residents; P = .0002). This progress toward a more representative residency program was met by challenges, such as pipeline concerns, the minority tax, and recruitment during a pandemic. We were able to implement small, low-resource strategies that had a large cumulative impact and could be implemented in other residency programs. Specific tactics and challenges encountered are discussed in this special article.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/education , Program Development , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Equity , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pediatricians/supply & distribution , United States/epidemiology
3.
Acad Med ; 97(3S): S35-S39, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532557

ABSTRACT

In this article, the authors describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric graduate medical education (GME), including the impact on clinical experiences for trainees, teaching methods used, trainee wellness, GME leader wellness and support, and the traditional interview process. A thorough literature review was done to identify impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric GME. In addition, information was collected through Association of Pediatric Program Directors virtual cafes and conferences. Positive changes for GME from the COVID-19 pandemic included: the rapid transition to telehealth; asynchronous learning allowing for increased cross-program collaboration; innovative online teaching modalities; increased flexibility and decreased cost of online recruitment; and shared innovations across pediatric GME. Challenging aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic included: decreased learning about common childhood illnesses, such as bronchiolitis, acute otitis media, and influenza; decreased patient volumes and patient complexity in clinics and inpatient wards, leading to less practice developing efficiency, time management, and triaging skills; and an increased burden on trainees, including moral distress and decreased support from one another and other social supports. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted important opportunities in U.S. educational systems. As medical educators move forward, it will be important to learn from these while mitigating the negative impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Pediatrics/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
5.
Minerva Pediatr (Torino) ; 73(5): 460-466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513377

ABSTRACT

Inevitably, along with other healthcare specializations, pediatric surgery was affected by the Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children were reported to manifest mild to moderate symptoms and mortality was primarily observed in patients aged <1 year and having underlying comorbidities. Most of the cases were asymptomatic in children, hence, posing a challenge for pediatric surgery centers to take drastic measures to reduce the virus transmission. Telemedicine was introduced and out-patient consultations were conducted online as out-patient clinics were closed. Elective surgeries were postponed with delayed appointments while the healthcare sector was diverted towards tackling COVID-19. Case urgency was classified and triaged, leading to limited surgeries being performed only in COVID-19 negative patients following an extensive screening process. The screening process consisted of online history taking and RT-PCR tests. Newer practices such as mouth rinse, video laryngoscopy, and anesthesia were introduced to restrict patients from crying, coughing, and sneezing, as an attempt to avoid aerosolization of viral particles and safely conduct pediatric surgeries during the pandemic. Surgical trainees were also affected as the smaller number of surgeries conducted reduced the clinical experience available to medical enthusiasts. There is still room for advanced practices to be introduced in pediatric surgery and restore all kinds of surgeries to improve the quality of life of the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures , General Surgery/education , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Patient Selection , Pediatrics/education , Preoperative Care/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
7.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e13, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484003

ABSTRACT

Around the UK, commissioners have different models for delivering NHS 111, General Practice (GP) out-of-hours and urgent care services, focusing on telephony to help deliver urgent and emergency care. During the (early phases of the) COVID-19 pandemic, NHS 111 experienced an unprecedented volume of calls. At any time, 25%-30% of calls relate to children and young people (CYP). In response, the CYP's Transformation and Integrated Urgent Care teams at NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSE/I) assisted in redeploying volunteer paediatricians into the integrated urgent care NHS 111 Clinical Assessment Services (CAS), taking calls about CYP. From this work, key stakeholders developed a paediatric 111 consultation framework, as well as learning outcomes, key capabilities and illustrations mapped against the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) Progress curriculum domains, to aid paediatricians in training to undertake NHS 111 activities. These learning outcomes and key capabilities have been endorsed by the RCPCH Curriculum Review Group and are recommended to form part of the integrated urgent care service specification and workforce blueprint to improve outcomes for CYP.


Subject(s)
After-Hours Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Curriculum , Humans , Pediatrics/education , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Telephone , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
J Pediatr ; 241: 203-211.e1, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473386

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine if training residents in a structured communication method elicits specific behaviors in a laboratory model of interaction with vaccine-hesitant parents. STUDY DESIGN: Standardized patients portraying vaccine-hesitant parents were used to assess the effectiveness of training in the Announce, Inquire, Mirror, Secure (AIMS) Method for Healthy Conversations. Blinded pediatric residents were pseudorandomized to receive AIMS or control training and underwent pre- and post-training encounters with blinded standardized patients. Encounters were assessed by blinded raters using a novel tool. Participant confidence and standardized patient evaluations of the participants' general communication skills were assessed. RESULTS: Ratings were available for 27 AIMS and 26 control participants. Statistically significant increases in post-training scores (maximum = 30) were detected in AIMS, but not in control, participants (median, 21.3 [IQR, 19.8-24.8] vs 18.8 [IQR, 16.9-20.9]; P < .001). Elements (maximum score = 6) with significant increases were Inquire (0.67 [IQR, 0-1.76] vs -0.33 [IQR, -0.67 to 0.33]; P < .001); Mirror (1.33 [IQR, 0 to 2] vs -0.33 [IQR, -0.92 to 0]; P < .001) and Secure (0.33 [IQR, 0 to 1.67] vs -0.17 [IQR, -0.67 to 0.33]; P = .017). Self-confidence increased equally in both groups. Standardized patients did not detect a difference in communication skills after training and between groups. Internal consistency and inter-rater reliability of the assessment tool were modest. CONCLUSIONS: Standardized patients proved useful in studying the effectiveness of structured communication training, but may have been limited in their ability to perceive a difference between groups owing to the predetermined encounter outcome of vaccine refusal. AIMS training should be studied in real-world scenarios to determine if it impacts vaccine acceptance.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Communication , Internship and Residency/methods , Patient Education as Topic/methods , Pediatrics/education , Physician-Patient Relations , Adult , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Infant , Kentucky , Male , Parents , Patient Simulation
9.
Pediatr Neurol ; 126: 3-8, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447049

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic presented many challenges for graduate medical education, including the need to quickly implement virtual residency interviews. We investigated how different programs approached these challenges to determine best practices. METHODS: Surveys to solicit perspectives of program directors, program coordinators, and chief residents regarding virtual interviews were designed through an iterative process by two child neurology residency program directors. Surveys were distributed by email in May 2021. Results were summarized using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Responses were received from 35 program directors and 34 program coordinators from 76 programs contacted. Compared with the 2019-2020 recruitment season, in 2020-2021, 14 of 35 programs received >10% more applications and most programs interviewed ≥12 applicants per position. Interview days were typically five to six hours long and were often coordinated with pediatrics interviews. Most programs (13/15) utilized virtual social events with residents, but these often did not allow residents to provide quality feedback about applicants. Program directors could adequately assess most applicant qualities but felt that virtual interviews limited their ability to assess applicants' interpersonal communication skills and to showcase special features of their programs. Most respondents felt that a combination of virtual and in-person interviewing should be utilized in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Residency program directors perceived some negative impacts of virtual interviewing on their recruitment efforts but in general felt that virtual interviews adequately replaced in-person interviews for assessing applicants. Most programs felt that virtual interviewing should be utilized in the future.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic , Neurology/education , Pediatrics/education , Videoconferencing , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , School Admission Criteria , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Pediatrics ; 148(4)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443877

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic significantly impacted undergraduate and graduate medical education and created challenges that prevented a traditional approach to residency and fellowship recruitment and interviews. Early in the pandemic, the pediatric education community came together to support applicants and training programs and to foster an equitable recruitment process. We describe many of our community's innovations, including the use of virtual cafés to educate programs and highlight best practices for virtual recruitment and the use of regional webinars to highlight residency programs and provide information to applicants. Surveys of applicants and programs suggest that the virtual interview process worked well overall, with applicants and programs saving both time and money and programs maintaining a high rate of filling their positions. On the basis of this experience, we highlight the strengths and weaknesses of 3 potential models for future interview seasons. We close with a series of questions that need further investigation to create an effective and equitable recruitment process for the future.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Internet , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic/methods , Pediatrics/education , Personnel Selection/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Job Application , Pandemics , Pediatrics/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
11.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 60(14): 569-573, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390403

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted inpatient pediatric services across the United States, creating opportunities for innovation. A recent Webinar organized by the Telehealth for Pediatric GI Care Now working group and sponsored by the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition provided insights into how inpatient pediatric gastroenterology services were affected and how physicians adapted during the crisis. These findings suggest the use of telehealth technologies may augment family communication and facilitate multidisciplinary care in the future. We anticipate that these innovative applications of telehealth will comprise a part of a toolkit for gastroenterologists to be used during this public health emergency and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastroenterology/education , Pediatrics/education , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Humans , Societies, Medical/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
12.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc101, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389117

ABSTRACT

The two-week block rotation in paediatrics (tenth semester) took place for 62 students purely as online teaching in the summer semester of 2020, at the time of the initial restrictions. As a teaching module, virtual patient presentations including debriefing took place as synchronous teaching. Patients and one parent were broadcast from the wards and outpatient clinics via video conference. Students were able to interact in small groups with 15-22 patients or their parents, respectively, via a doctor and both conduct the case history interview and brief the examination steps. Despite the limitation of not being able to perform the clinical examination themselves, participants rated the block rotation with good marks. They particularly appreciated the ability to interact with the children online as an indispensable compromise in times of suspended classroom teaching during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Pediatrics/education , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Cardiol Young ; 31(3): 377-380, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331353

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound impact on medical educational curricula. We aimed to examine the impact of these unprecedented changes on the formal education of paediatric cardiology fellows through a nationwide survey. A REDCap™-based voluntary anonymous survey was sent to all current paediatric cardiology fellows in the United States of America in May, 2020. Of 143 respondents, 121 were categorical fellows, representing over one-fourth of all categorical paediatric cardiology fellows in the United States of America. Nearly all (140/143, 97.9%) respondents utilised online learning during the pandemic, with 134 (93.7%) reporting an increase in use compared to pre-pandemic. The percentage of respondents reporting curriculum supplementation with outside lectures increased from 11.9 to 88.8% during the pandemic. Respondents considered online learning to be "equally or more effective" than in-person lectures in convenience (133/142, 93.7%), improving fellow attendance (132/142, 93.0%), improving non-fellow attendance (126/143, 88.1%), and meeting individual learning needs (101/143, 70.6%). The pandemic positively affected the lecture curriculum of 83 respondents (58.0%), with 35 (24.5%) reporting no change and 25 (17.5%) reporting a negative effect. A positive effect was most noted by those whose programmes utilised supplemental outside lectures (62.2 versus 25.0%, p = 0.004) and those whose lecture frequency did not decrease (65.1 versus 5.9%, p < 0.001). Restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic have greatly increased utilisation of online learning platforms by medical training programmes. This survey reveals that an online lecture curriculum, despite inherent obstacles, offers advantages that may mitigate some negative consequences of the pandemic on fellowship education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/education , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships , Pediatrics/education , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): 270-272, 2021 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325945

ABSTRACT

In patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, endotracheal intubation is a procedure with a high risk for transmission. A videolaryngoscopy is a supplementary level of health care provider protection, but commercial videolaryngoscopes are expensive and not always available in pediatric intensive care units in Argentina. Our objective was to describe intubation practice using an infant head mannequin with a low-cost, handcrafted videolaryngoscope. Fifteen pediatricians with no prior experience using the device participated in an intubation practice in a head mannequin with a handcrafted videolaryngoscope. The average time for the first attempt was 116.4 seconds (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 84.8- 148.0) and, for the second one, 44.2 seconds (95 % CI: 27.7-60.6). Time decreased significantly for the second attempt (p: 0.0001). A successful intubation was achieved with the device in all attempts, and the procedure duration decreased with the second practice.


En pacientes con infección por SARS-CoV-2 la intubación endotraqueal es un procedimiento con riesgo elevado de contagio. La videolaringoscopia complementa la protección del profesional, pero los videolaringoscopios comerciales son caros y no siempre están disponibles en las terapias intensivas pediátricas argentinas. El objetivo fue describir la práctica de intubación en un modelo de cabeza de simulación de lactante con un videolaringoscopio artesanal de bajo costo. Quince pediatras sin experiencia previa con el dispositivo participaron de una práctica de intubación en una cabeza de simulación con un videolaringoscopio artesanal. El tiempo promedio del primer intento fue de 116,4 segundos (intervalo de confianza del 95 % [IC95 %]: 84,8-148,0) y, el del siguiente fue de 44,2 segundos (IC95 %: 27,7­60,6). El tiempo disminuyó de forma significativa en el segundo intento (p : 0,0001). El dispositivo permitió la intubación exitosa en todos los intentos acortando la duración del procedimiento en la segunda práctica.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/economics , Laryngoscopy/education , Pediatrics/education , Simulation Training/methods , Argentina , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Health Care Costs , Humans , Infant , Internship and Residency/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/economics , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/economics , Laryngoscopy/instrumentation , Laryngoscopy/methods , Learning Curve , Manikins , Pediatrics/economics , Time Factors , Video Recording
17.
Eur J Pediatr Surg ; 31(4): 319-325, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281760

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted our way of living in an unprecedented manner. Medical professionals at all levels have been forced to adapt to the novel virus. The delivery of surgical services and the subsequent learning opportunities for surgical residents have especially been disrupted and the pediatric surgical community has not been exempted by this. This article highlights the challenges imposed by the pandemic and outlines the various learning modalities that can be implemented to ensure continued learning opportunities throughout the pandemic and beyond. Furthermore, it aims to show how the utilization and expansion of technologies maintain and further increase the communication, as well as the exchange of and access to knowledge among peers. Virtual education-, application-, and simulation-based learning and social media, as well as telemedicine and online conferences, will play a considerable role in the future of surgical specialties and surgical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/trends , Pediatrics/education , Specialties, Surgical/education , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Simulation Training , Social Media , Telemedicine
19.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(8): e29088, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206858

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has upended medical practice and education, but has also catalyzed enhancements in the field. Early on, a local group of researchers united to investigate the impact of the pandemic on pediatric hematology oncology (PHO). From this group, a regional educational series was established, "virtual-Symposium of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology of New York" (v-SYMPHONY). The implementation of these endeavors while PHO fellowship applications are declining has highlighted our perceptions that education, mentoring, and career expectations are not keeping up with the needs of current trainees. We describe our regional experience joining together to further education and research, and reflect on the current landscape of PHO training and workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Hematology/education , Medical Oncology/education , Pediatrics/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Congresses as Topic , Humans
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