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1.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 41-46, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF centers shifted to a telehealth delivery model. Our study aimed to determine how people with CF (PwCF) and their families experienced telehealth and assessed its quality and acceptability for future CF care. METHODS: The CF Patient and Family State of Care Survey (PFSoC) was fielded from August 31-October 30, 2020. The PFSoC explored themes of overall telehealth quality, ease of use, desirability, and preference for a future mix of in-person and telehealth care. Demographic covariates considered included: gender, age, CFTR modulator status, and region of residence. RESULTS: 424 PwCF and parents of PwCF responded (47% parents). Most (81%) reported a telehealth visit which included a MD/APP and nurse team members. 91% found telehealth easy to use, and 66% reported similar/higher quality than in-person care. One-third (34%) reported the highest desire for future telehealth care, with 45% (n =212) desiring 50% or more of visits conducted via telehealth. Adults were more likely than parents to report highest desire for future telehealth (64% vs. 36%). Respondents who perceived telehealth as similar/higher quality were more likely to desire future telehealth compared to those who perceived telehealth as lower quality (96% vs. 50%). Mixed methods analysis revealed themes affecting perceptions of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF desire for future telehealth was influenced by perception of quality and age. Several themes emerged that need to be explored as telehealth is adapted into the CF chronic care model, especially when thinking about integration into pediatric care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Family Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Models, Organizational , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
2.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 30(2): 532-550, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545666

ABSTRACT

Purpose Our aim was to critically review recent literature on the use of telehealth for dysphagia during the COVID-19 pandemic and enhance this information in order to provide evidence- and practice-based clinical guidance during and after the pandemic. Method We conducted a rapid systematized review to identify telehealth adaptations during COVID-19, according to peer-reviewed articles published from January to August 2020. Of the 40 articles identified, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Full-text reviews were completed by three raters, followed by qualitative synthesis of the results and description of practical recommendations for the use of telehealth for dysphagia. Results Seven articles were guidelines articles, three were editorials, and one was a narrative review. One article focused on telehealth and dysphagia during COVID-19. The remaining 10 mentioned telehealth in varying degrees while focusing on dysphagia management during the pandemic. No articles discussed pediatrics in depth. The most common procedure for which telehealth was recommended was the clinical swallowing assessment (8/11), followed by therapy (7/11). Six articles characterized telehealth as a second-tier service delivery option. Only one article included brief guidance on telehealth-specific factors, such as legal safeguards, safety, privacy, infrastructure, and facilitators. Conclusions Literature published during the pandemic on telehealth for dysphagia is extremely limited and guarded in endorsing telehealth as an equivalent service delivery model. We have presented prepandemic and emerging current evidence for the safety and reliability of dysphagia telemanagement, in combination with practical guidelines to facilitate the safe adoption of telehealth during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Deglutition Disorders/therapy , Speech-Language Pathology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis , Deglutition Disorders/rehabilitation , Humans , Pandemics , Pediatrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Pediatr Radiol ; 51(11): 1991-1999, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a worldwide pandemic in March 2020, many authors have noted the collateral damage on non-COVID-19-related illnesses. These indirect effects of the pandemic have resulted in people presenting later and with more severe stages of disease, even if their diagnoses are not directly related to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: We studied these indirect effects of COVID-19 on the imaging workup and outcomes for pediatric patients at our center who had acute appendicitis during the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of cases in children ≤18 years who were evaluated for acute appendicitis during the same period, March 1 to May 31, in both 2019 and 2020. We compared demographic and clinical data as well as surgical and pathological findings, and we graded imaging findings according to severity. Differences in patient outcomes were assessed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Pearson chi-square test. RESULTS: The total number of pediatric patients evaluated with imaging for acute appendicitis dropped by 43% between 2019 and 2020 (298 vs. 169), but the total number of children treated remained similar (59 vs. 51). There was proportionate use of US and CT in each timeframe but a higher percentage of positive imaging findings in 2020 (50/169, 29.6% vs. 56/298, 18.7% in 2019, P=0.04). There were more imaging examinations with features of complicated appendicitis among positive cases (9/51, 18% vs. 5/59, 8% in 2019, P=0.08) and more pathologically proven perforated cases during the pandemic (14/51, 27% vs. 6/59, 10% in 2019, P=0.11), although these results did not reach statistical significance. There were no changes in surgical management, vital signs, laboratory values, length of stay or complication rates. CONCLUSION: There was a large drop in the number of pediatric patients imaged for acute appendicitis during the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic despite similar numbers of patients treated. The utilization trends of US vs. CT remained stable between time periods. The differences in imaging findings and perforation rates were less pronounced compared to other published studies.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pediatrics/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Acute Disease , Appendectomy , Appendicitis/epidemiology , Appendicitis/surgery , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Neurosurg Pediatr ; 28(4): 483-489, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357502

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pediatric neurosurgery outpatient consultation is conducted face-to-face (FTF) conventionally. Reasons for not using telemedicine include the perceived difficulty with obtaining a reliable history and an inability to perform a physical examination. However, FTF consultation can cause distress and inconvenience to the child and family. In 2018, the authors' department piloted a clinical nurse specialist-led telephone consultation (TC) for follow-up appointments. This was extended to the routine neurosurgery clinics in 2020. In this study, the authors evaluate 1) the effectiveness of TC, 2) families' experience with TC compared with traditional FTF appointments, and 3) the factors associated with their preferences. METHODS: In this prospective study using a survey methodology, TCs carried out by 2 consultant neurosurgeons and 1 nurse specialist over 8 weeks were evaluated. Based on clinical background, each patient was assigned to a TC or FTF appointment. Clinical and surgical details and home postal code were recorded. At the end of each TC, the clinician recorded whether the child required an FTF appointment within 3 months. In addition, patients/families answered 1) how the current TC compared with FTF consultation, and 2) their preference of TC or FTF for the next consultation. RESULTS: A total of 114 TCs were included. No child required an FTF appointment within 3 months. Overall, compared with an FTF appointment, the TC was the "same/better/much better" for 101 families (89%), and "worse/much worse" for 13 (11%). Two-thirds of families preferred the next appointment to be a TC. Families attending a TC for new appointments preferred the next appointment to be FTF compared with those attending a follow-up TC (6/8 [75%] vs 31/106 [29%], p = 0.006). A high rating of the current TC was associated with a preference for a TC as the next appointment (p < 0.0001). Families preferring TC over FTF lived farther from the hospital (mean 38 vs 27 km) (p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS: From the clinicians' perspective, TC is adequate in appropriately selected patients as either the primary mode of consultation or as a triage system. From a service users' perspective, the majority of families felt that the appointment was the same/better than traditional FTF appointments. The findings suggested that 1) new patients should be offered FTF appointments; 2) follow-up TCs should be offered to families when possible; and 3) clinicians should develop their skills in conducting TCs. The authors' results have led to a modification of our algorithm in delivering traditional outpatient service and telemedicine with telephone.


Subject(s)
Neurosurgery/methods , Pediatrics/methods , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , United Kingdom , Young Adult
6.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 60(11-12): 452-458, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354635

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine, more novel in provision of pediatric care, rapidly expanded due to the recent coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of telemedicine for acute and chronic care provision in an underserved pediatric primary care center. Items assessed included patient demographic data, chief complaint, and alternative care locations if telemedicine was not available. In our setting, 62% of telemedicine visits were for acute concerns and 38% for chronic concerns. Of acute telemedicine visits, 16.5% of families would have sought care in the Emergency Department/Urgent Care, and 11.3% would have opted for no care had telemedicine not been offered. The most common chronic issues addressed were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (80.3%) and asthma (16.9%). Racial disparities existed among our telemedicine visits with Black patients utilizing telemedicine services less frequently than non-Black patients. Telemedicine is feasible for pediatric acute and chronic care, but systems must be designed to mitigate widening racial disparities.


Subject(s)
Medically Underserved Area , Pediatrics/methods , Primary Health Care/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies
10.
Hosp Pediatr ; 11(6): 636-649, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238799

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Pediatric family-centered rounds (FCRs) have been shown to have benefits in staff satisfaction, teaching, and rounding efficiency, but no systematic review has been conducted to explicitly examine the humanistic impact of FCRs. OBJECTIVE: The objective with this review is to determine if FCRs promote the core values of humanism in medicine by answering the question, "Do FCRs promote humanistic pediatric care?" DATA SOURCES: Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we conducted a search of PubMed, Web of Science, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts for peer-reviewed pediatric studies through January 1, 2020. We used search terms including FCRs, communication, humanism, and the specific descriptors in the Gold Foundation's definition of humanism. STUDY SELECTION: Abstracts (n = 1003) were assessed for 5 primary outcomes: empathy, enhanced communication, partnership, respect, and satisfaction and service. We evaluated 158 full-text articles for inclusion, reconciling discrepancies through an iterative process. DATA EXTRACTION: Data abstraction, thematic analysis, and conceptual synthesis were conducted on 29 studies. RESULTS: Pediatric family-centered rounds (FCRs) improved humanistic outcomes within all 5 identified themes. Not all studies revealed improvement within every category. The humanistic benefits of FCRs are enhanced through interventions targeted toward provider-family barriers, such as health literacy. Patients with limited English proficiency or disabilities or who were receiving intensive care gained additional benefits. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric FCRs promote humanistic outcomes including increased empathy, partnership, respect, service, and communication. Limitations included difficulty in defining humanism, variable implementation, and inconsistent reporting of humanistic outcomes. Future efforts should include highlighting FCR's humanistic benefits, universal implementation, and adapting FCRs to pandemics such as coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Humanism , Pediatrics/methods , Professional-Family Relations , Teaching Rounds/methods , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Communication , Empathy , Humans
14.
JAMA Pediatr ; 175(1): 11-12, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1107456
15.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 37(6): 827-833, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103433

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: SARS-COV-2 pandemic has affected the population worldwide requiring social distancing, quarantine and isolation as strategies to control virus propagation. Initial measures to reduce the burden to the health care system during the pandemic included deferring elective surgery. These damage control measures did not take into account the mid- and long-term implications. Management of congenital anomalies can be time sensitive with delays resulting in permanent disability, morbidity and increased costs to the healthcare system. This study reports the results of using a novel scoring system that enables triage of time sensitive congenital anomalies and pediatric surgical conditions and how implementation of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS®) principles allowed optimization of resources and reduced the burden to the system while allowing for appropriate care of pediatric patients with urgent urologic surgical conditions. METHODS: We present a prospective case series of patients with congenital urological conditions scheduled and taken to surgery during COVID-19 pandemic. All pediatric urology cases that were pending and or scheduled for surgery at the moment the pandemic struck as well as all cases that presented to the emergency department with urological conditions were triaged and included for analysis using a modified Medically Necessary, Time-Sensitive Procedures: Scoring System (MeNTS). A modified MeNTS was implemented for pediatric patients, giving more priority to the impact of deferring surgical intervention on patient's prognosis. An individualized evaluation using this scoring system was applied to each patient. Intra- and postoperative ERAS® principles were applied to all cases operated during the pandemic between March 20th and April 24th to reduce the burden to the healthcare system. RESULTS: A total of 49 patients were triaged and included for analysis with a mean age of 6.47 years of age. Adjusted MeNTS showed that all clinically emergent cases had a score of 12 or less. Cases that could be postponed for 2 weeks but no longer had a score between 13 and 15. The ones that could wait 6 weeks or longer had scores higher than 16. Score results were not the same for similar procedures and individualized assessments resulted in scores based on an individual patient's conditions. From the total cases, implementation of ERAS® principles increased outpatient procedures from 68 to 90.4%. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a novel triaging method to rank pediatric urological surgical management based on individualized patient's clinical conditions. Cutoff values of 12 and 16 allowed appropriate triage preventing the postponement of urgent urologic cases during the COVID-19 pandemic. Implementation of ERAS® principles allowed for these procedures to be done in the outpatient setting, preserving valuable healthcare resources. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective cohort study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pediatrics/methods , Triage/methods , Urologic Diseases/surgery , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 60(3): 149-150, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080957
17.
Pediatr Res ; 90(3): 637-641, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic affects medical care worldwide, including patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Thus, we aimed to assess its impact on health care provision, fear of infection, adherence to medical treatment, and compliance with preventative instructions in children and adolescents with IBD. METHODS: A cross-sectional telephonic survey using a Likert scale-based questionnaire was conducted among all pediatric patients with IBD from a single tertiary medical center. RESULTS: A total of 244 pediatric patients with IBD were included in the study, reporting a high rate of fear of severe COVID-19 infection due to IBD or IBD medications (198, 81.1%). Most of the patients obeyed the Ministry of Health instructions (228, 93.4%), while almost 50% took additional protective measures including avoidance of school and complete lockdown. Concerns regarding the attendance of regular clinics (116, 47.5%) and emergency room in case of IBD exacerbation (178, 73%) were frequently reported. Only 7 patients (2.9%) changed or discontinued their IBD treatment due to COVID-19. CONCLUSION: We noted several distinct features of the COVID-19 pandemic effect on pediatric patients with IBD including a high rate of fear of severe COVID-19 infection, fear of attending necessary medical facilities, and high rate of avoidance of social activities. IMPACT: Pediatric patients with IBD have a high rate of fear of severe COVID-19 infection, fear of attending necessary medical facilities, and a high rate of avoidance of social activities. Medication adherence rate in pediatric patients with IBD during the pandemic is similar to the adherence rate among adults with IBD. Almost 50% of pediatric patients with IBD took additional protective measures including avoidance of school and voluntary lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/diagnosis , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/prevention & control , Parents , Patient Compliance , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Israel , Male , Pediatrics/methods , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(5): 648-651, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029475

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To document the lived experience of Italian pediatric emergency physicians during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: We developed a structured interview to collect the lived experience of the staff of the pediatric emergency department (PED) of a tertiary referral university hospital in Northern Italy. The open-ended questions were draft according to the suggestions of Canadian colleagues and administered by 1 interviewer, who was part of the PED staff, at the end of March 2020. All the PED staff was interviewed, on a voluntary basis, using purposive sampling. RESULTS: Most respondents declared to be afraid of becoming infected and of infecting their families. The number of patients seen in the PED has decreased, and the cases tend to be more severe. A shift in the clinical approach to the ill child has occurred, the physical examination is problem-oriented, aiming to avoid un-necessary maneuvers and to minimize the number of practitioners involved. The most challenging aspects reported are: (1) performing a physical examination in personal protective equipment (PPE), (2) being updated with rapidly evolving guidelines, and (3) staying focused on the possible COVID-19 clinical presentation without failing in differential diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems that pediatric emergency physicians are radically changing their clinical practice, aiming at prioritizing essential interventions and maneuvers and self-protection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/standards , Physicians/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/methods , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Physician-Patient Relations , Qualitative Research , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 42(4): 314-321, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990835

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the use of telehealth in developmental behavioral pediatric (DBP) fellowship-affiliated practices during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic. METHODS: An electronic survey was disseminated to all DBP fellowship-associated practice locations to determine the use of telehealth in DBP care provision, before and since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed responses using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A total of 35 of 42 eligible practice sites responded (83% response rate). Most sites (51.4%) reported using telehealth less than once per month before the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the onset of COVID-19, 100% of programs reported conducting video-based telehealth visits multiple days per week. Most sites reported conducting evaluations and follow-up visits for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral concerns, developmental delay, genetic disorders, and learning disability. Most sites were able to continue medication management by telehealth (>88%), offer interpreter services for families with limited English proficiency participating in telehealth visits (>90%), and incorporate trainees and interdisciplinary team members in telehealth visits (>90%). Greater variability was observed in sites' ability to collect telehealth practice evaluation measures. CONCLUSION: Most sites are providing evaluations and ongoing care for DBP conditions through telehealth. The rapid adoption of telehealth can have ramifications for the way that DBP care is delivered in the future; therefore, it is imperative to understand current practice patterns and variations to determine the best use of telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Pediatrics/methods , Telemedicine , Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders/diagnosis , Child , Child Development , Child Development Disorders, Pervasive/diagnosis , Developmental Disabilities/diagnosis , Humans , Pediatrics/education , Telemedicine/methods
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