Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 23
Filter
1.
CMAJ Open ; 9(4): E1149-E1158, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There were large disruptions to health care services after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to describe the extent to which pandemic-related changes in service delivery and access affected use of primary care for children overall and by equity strata in the 9 months after pandemic onset in Manitoba and Ontario. METHODS: We performed a population-based study of children aged 17 years or less with provincial health insurance in Ontario or Manitoba before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (Jan. 1, 2017-Nov. 28, 2020). We calculated the weekly rates of in-person and virtual primary care well-child and sick visits, overall and by age group, neighbourhood material deprivation level, rurality and immigrant status, and assessed changes in visit rates after COVID-19 restrictions were imposed compared to expected baseline rates calculated for the 3 years before pandemic onset. RESULTS: Among almost 3 million children in Ontario and more than 300 000 children in Manitoba, primary care visit rates declined to 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77-0.82) of expected in Ontario and 0.82 (95% CI 0.79-0.84) of expected in Manitoba in the 9 months after the onset of the pandemic. Virtual visits accounted for 53% and 29% of visits in Ontario and Manitoba, respectively. The largest monthly decreases in visits occurred in April 2020. Although visit rates increased slowly after April 2020, they had not returned to prerestriction levels by November 2020 in either province. Children aged more than 1 year to 12 years experienced the greatest decrease in visits, especially for well-child care. Compared to prepandemic levels, visit rates were lowest among rural Manitobans, urban Ontarians and Ontarians in low-income neighbourhoods. INTERPRETATION: During the study period, the pandemic contributed to rapid, immediate and inequitable decreases in primary care use, with some recovery and a substantial shift to virtual care. Postpandemic planning must consider the need for catch-up visits, and the long-term impacts warrant further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Age Distribution , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Databases, Factual , Emigrants and Immigrants , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Manitoba/epidemiology , Ontario/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Population Surveillance , Rural Population
4.
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs ; 47(5): 459-469, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270772

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe medical device-related pressure injuries (MDRPIs) in hospitalized pediatric patients. DESIGN: A prospective, descriptive study. SAMPLE/SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The sample comprised 625 patients cared for in 8 US pediatric hospitals. Participants were aged preterm to 21 years, on bed rest for at least 24 hours, and had a medical device in place. METHODS: Two nursing teams, blinded to the other's assessments, worked in tandem to assess pressure injury risk, type of medical devices in use, and preventive interventions for each medical device. They also identified the presence, location, and stage of MDRPI. Subjects were observed up to 8 times over 4 weeks, or until discharge, whichever occurred first. RESULTS: Of 625 enrolled patients, 42 (7%) developed 1 or more MDRPIs. Two-thirds of patients with MDRPIs were younger than 8 years. Patients experiencing MDRPIs had higher acuity scores on hospital admission, were more frequently cognitively and/or functionally impaired, or were extreme in body mass index. Respiratory devices caused the most injuries (6.19/1000 device-days), followed by immobilizers (2.40/1000 device-days), gastric tubes (2.24/1000 device-days), and external monitoring devices (1.77/1000 device-days). Of the 6336 devices in place, 36% did not have an MDRPI preventive intervention in place. Clinical variables contributing to MDRPI development included intensive care unit care (odds ratio [OR] 8.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-43.6), use of neuromuscular blockade (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.7-7.8), and inotropic/vasopressor medications (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7-4.3). Multivariable analysis indicated that Braden QD scores alone predicted MDRPI development. CONCLUSION: Medical devices are common in hospitalized infants and children and these medical devices place patients at risk for MDRPI.


Subject(s)
Equipment and Supplies/standards , Pressure Ulcer/therapy , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Equipment and Supplies/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pediatrics/instrumentation , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors
6.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(5): 648-651, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029475

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To document the lived experience of Italian pediatric emergency physicians during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: We developed a structured interview to collect the lived experience of the staff of the pediatric emergency department (PED) of a tertiary referral university hospital in Northern Italy. The open-ended questions were draft according to the suggestions of Canadian colleagues and administered by 1 interviewer, who was part of the PED staff, at the end of March 2020. All the PED staff was interviewed, on a voluntary basis, using purposive sampling. RESULTS: Most respondents declared to be afraid of becoming infected and of infecting their families. The number of patients seen in the PED has decreased, and the cases tend to be more severe. A shift in the clinical approach to the ill child has occurred, the physical examination is problem-oriented, aiming to avoid un-necessary maneuvers and to minimize the number of practitioners involved. The most challenging aspects reported are: (1) performing a physical examination in personal protective equipment (PPE), (2) being updated with rapidly evolving guidelines, and (3) staying focused on the possible COVID-19 clinical presentation without failing in differential diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, it seems that pediatric emergency physicians are radically changing their clinical practice, aiming at prioritizing essential interventions and maneuvers and self-protection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/standards , Physicians/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/methods , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Physician-Patient Relations , Qualitative Research , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Eur J Pediatr ; 180(5): 1497-1504, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012213

ABSTRACT

The restrictive measures required to face the recent outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may impact patterns of healthcare utilization. Our aim was to provide an insight into the change in the use of a pediatric emergency department (ED) during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The medical records of the children seen in our pediatric ED during March and April 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. Consequently, these were compared to the medical records of 2018 and 2019 from the same time period and from other control periods (January-February 2019 and 2020, and July-August 2018 and 2019). The total number of ED visits declined by 73% from 2019 to 2020 (3051 vs 818). Significant variations were observed in the distribution of children between triage categories: the proportion of patients who was given a green-code showed a 0.59-fold decrease in comparison to 2019 (95% CI 0.5-0.69), while a relative increase in the proportion of yellow codes was observed (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2-1.78).Conclusion: Quarantine measures significantly impacted on the total number of patients and on the reasons for visiting them in our pediatric ED. This substantial decrease in pediatric care may either be due to lower rates of acute infections because of social distancing, or to parents' or caregivers' reticence to risk exposure to SARS-CoV-2 in a health-care setting. What is known: • A recent outbreak of a novel coronavirus responsible for a severe acute respiratory syndrome is spreading globally. • Restrictive measures may impact patterns of healthcare utilization, as observed in other previous outbreaks. What is new: • This study shows significant variations in the distribution of children among triage categories during the COVID-19 pandemic. • Discharge diagnosis was significantly different as well, in particular a relative increase in the proportion of children presenting with traumatic injuries and a decrease of viral infections were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Retrospective Studies
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(12): e24345, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telehealth, the delivery of health care through telecommunication technology, has potential to address multiple health system concerns. Despite this potential, only 15% of pediatric primary care clinicians reported using telemedicine as of 2016, with the majority identifying inadequate payment for these services as the largest barrier to their adoption. The COVID-19 pandemic led to rapid changes in payment and regulations surrounding telehealth, enabling its integration into primary care pediatrics. OBJECTIVE: Due to limited use of telemedicine in primary care pediatrics prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, much is unknown about the role of telemedicine in pediatric primary care. To address this gap in knowledge, we examined the association between practice-level telemedicine use within a large pediatric primary care network and practice characteristics, telemedicine visit diagnoses, in-person visit volumes, child-level variations in telemedicine use, and clinician attitudes toward telemedicine. METHODS: We analyzed electronic health record data from 45 primary care practices and administered a clinician survey to practice clinicians. Practices were stratified into tertiles based on rates of telemedicine use (low, intermediate, high) per 1000 patients per week during a two-week period (April 19 to May 2, 2020). By practice tertile, we compared (1) practice characteristics, (2) telemedicine visit diagnoses, (3) rates of in-person visits to the office, urgent care, and the emergency department, (4) child-level variation in telemedicine use, and (5) clinician attitudes toward telemedicine across these practices. RESULTS: Across pediatric primary care practices, telemedicine visit rates ranged from 5 to 23 telemedicine visits per 1000 patients per week. Across all tertiles, the most frequent telemedicine visit diagnoses were mental health (28%-36% of visits) and dermatologic (15%-28%). Compared to low telemedicine use practices, high telemedicine use practices had fewer in-person office visits (10 vs 16 visits per 1000 patients per week, P=.005) but more total encounters overall (in-office and telemedicine: 28 vs 22 visits per 1000 patients per week, P=.006). Telemedicine use varied with child age, race and ethnicity, and recent preventive care; however, no significant interactions existed between these characteristics and practice-level telemedicine use. Finally, clinician attitudes regarding the usability and impact of telemedicine did not vary significantly across tertiles. CONCLUSIONS: Across a network of pediatric practices, we identified significant practice-level variation in telemedicine use, with increased use associated with more varied telemedicine diagnoses, fewer in-person office visits, and increased overall primary care encounter volume. Thus, in the context of the pandemic, when underutilization of primary care was prevalent, higher practice-level telemedicine use supported pediatric primary care encounter volume closer to usual rates. Child-level telemedicine use differed by child age, race and ethnicity, and recent preventive care, building upon prior concerns about differences in access to telemedicine. However, increased practice-level use of telemedicine services was not associated with reduced or increased differences in use, suggesting that further work is needed to promote equitable access to primary care telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Electronic Health Records , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Child , Child, Preschool , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Office Visits , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720969557, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this brief report, we characterize pediatric primary care service utilization in metropolitan Chicago over the first 24 weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic response in relation to the comparable time period in 2019. METHODS: We examined retrospective visit and billing data, regardless of payer, from 16 independent pediatric practices that utilize a common electronic medical record platform within an Accountable Care Organization of 252 pediatricians in 71 offices throughout metropolitan Chicago. We categorized visits as Well-Child and Immunization-Only (WC-IO) or Other types and identified visits with a telemedicine billing modifier. Diagnoses for Other visits were tallied and categorized using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Clinical Classification System. We summarized counts of visits and the proportion of visits with a telemedicine billing modifier in one-week epochs for 2020 compared with 2019. RESULTS: There were 102 942 total visits (72 030 WC-IO; 30 912 Other) in 2020 and 144 672 visits (80 578 WC-IO; 64 094 Other) in 2019. WC-IO visits in 2020 were half of 2019 visits at the start of the Illinois Stay-at-Home Order and returned greater than 90% of 2019 visits in 8 weeks. Other visit types have remained below 70% of 2019 visits. A telemedicine billing modifier peaked in mid-April (21% of all visits) and declined to <10% of all visits in June (Phase 2 reopening). The top 10 most common diagnoses differed between years. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of well child and immunization visits suggests that practice-level efforts and policy change can ensure children receive recommended care as the pandemic evolves.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Child Health , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chicago/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Immunization , Infant , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Telemedicine
10.
Childs Nerv Syst ; 37(4): 1313-1317, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898010

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 pandemic has influenced all aspects of societies, with the healthcare being the most affected field. All specialties including neurosurgery are involved, and due to resource limitations, the number of elective surgeries in subspecialized filed has substantially decreased. Herein, we report our practice experience in pediatric neurosurgery in a tertiary hospital during pandemic, and the effects of pandemic on educational issues. METHODS: All the patients on whom any kind of neurosurgical operation was performed from March to June 2020 were retrospectively collected, and also from the same period in the previous year. RESULTS: A total of 111 patients underwent surgery in this period. This figure was 159 patients during the same period in 2019. The total number of surgical cases reduced by 31% compared to the last year. While ventriculoperitoneal shunts and supratentorial tumor were more frequent, there was a considerable reduction in subspecialized educational surgeries like neural tube defects and craniosynostoses. CONCLUSION: CVID-19 pandemic changed all scopes of medical practice and training. Considering the limitation in the available resources, the number of educational cases may decrease in subspecialized disciplines like pediatric neurosurgery. If pandemic continues, alternative measures should be taken to compensate for the shortcoming in technical and practical training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Developing Countries , Humans , Iran , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Pediatrics/education , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 9(6): 766-768, 2020 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889574

ABSTRACT

Visitor restriction policies in pediatric wards during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak are variable. Among 36 hospitals that responded to our survey, 97% allowed at least 1 visitor, with 67% restricting to 1 caregiver. Sixty-nine percent required the visitor to wear personal protective equipment and only 19% allowed non-household visitors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Pediatrics , Visitors to Patients , Canada , Child , Hospital Departments/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
12.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e043763, 2020 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835490

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated whether implementation of lockdown orders in South Africa affected ambulatory clinic visitation in rural Kwa-Zulu Natal (KZN). DESIGN: Observational cohort SETTING: Data were analysed from 11 primary healthcare clinics in northern KZN. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 46 523 individuals made 89 476 clinic visits during the observation period. EXPOSURE OF INTEREST: We conducted an interrupted time series analysis to estimate changes in clinic visitation with a focus on transitions from the prelockdown to the level 5, 4 and 3 lockdown periods. OUTCOME MEASURES: Daily clinic visitation at ambulatory clinics. In stratified analyses, we assessed visitation for the following subcategories: child health, perinatal care and family planning, HIV services, non-communicable diseases and by age and sex strata. RESULTS: We found no change in total clinic visits/clinic/day at the time of implementation of the level 5 lockdown (change from 90.3 to 84.6 mean visits/clinic/day, 95% CI -16.5 to 3.1), or at the transitions to less stringent level 4 and 3 lockdown levels. We did detect a >50% reduction in child healthcare visits at the start of the level 5 lockdown from 11.9 to 4.7 visits/day (-7.1 visits/clinic/day, 95% CI -8.9 to 5.3), both for children aged <1 year and 1-5 years, with a gradual return to prelockdown within 3 months after the first lockdown measure. In contrast, we found no drop in clinic visitation in adults at the start of the level 5 lockdown, or related to HIV care (from 37.5 to 45.6, 8.0 visits/clinic/day, 95% CI 2.1 to 13.8). CONCLUSIONS: In rural KZN, we identified a significant, although temporary, reduction in child healthcare visitation but general resilience of adult ambulatory care provision during the first 4 months of the lockdown. Future work should explore the impacts of the circulating epidemic on primary care provision and long-term impacts of reduced child visitation on outcomes in the region.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Primary Health Care , Public Health , Adult , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Family Planning Services/statistics & numerical data , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/methods , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 138: 110383, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791839

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Virtual outpatient clinics (VOPC) have been integrated into both paediatric and based adult outpatient services due to a multitude of factors, including increased demand for services, technological advances and rising morbidity secondary to ageing populations. The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has accentuated pressures on the National Health Service (NHS) infrastructure, particularly elective services, whilst radically altering patterns of practice. AIM: To evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on paediatric otolaryngology outpatient services whilst collating patient feedback to elicit long-term sustainability post COVID-19. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of VOPCs was undertaken at a tertiary paediatric referral centre over a 3-month capture period during the COVID-19 pandemic. Demographic, generic clinic (presenting complaint, new vs. follow-up, consultation type), as well as outcome data (medical or surgical intervention, discharge vs. ongoing review, onward referral, investigations, and conversion to face-to-face) was collated. Additionally a modified 15-point patient satisfaction survey was created. The Paediatric Otolaryngology Telemedicine Satisfaction survey (POTSS), was an adaptation of 4 validated patient satisfaction tools including the General Medical Council (GMC) patient questionnaire, the telehealth satisfaction scale (TESS), the telehealth usability questionnaire (TUQ), and the telemedicine satisfaction and usefulness questionnaire (TSUQ). RESULTS: Of 514 patients reviewed virtually over a 3-month period, 225 (45%) were randomly selected to participate, of which 200 met our inclusion criteria. The most common mode of consultation was telephony (92.5%, n = 185). Non-attendance rates were reduced when compared to face-to-face clinics during an equivalent period prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. A significant proportion of patients (29% compared to 26% pre-VOPC) were discharged to primary care. Nine percent were listed for surgery compared to 19% pre-VOPC. A subsequent face-to-face appointment was required in 10% of participants. Overall, the satisfaction when assessing the doctor-patient relationship, privacy & trust, as well as consultation domains was high, with the overwhelming majority of parents' content with the future integration and participation in VOPCs. CONCLUSION: An evolving worldwide pandemic has accelerated the need for healthcare services to reform in order to maintain a steady flow of patients within an elective outpatient setting without compromising patient care. Solutions must be sustainable long-term to account for future disruptions, whilst accounting for evolving patient demographics. Our novel survey has demonstrated the vast potential that the integration of VOPCs can offer paediatric otolaryngology services within a carefully selected cohort of patients.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Infant , Male , Pediatrics/methods , Physician-Patient Relations , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom
15.
CMAJ ; 192(44): E1347-E1356, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To mitigate the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), jurisdictions worldwide ramped down nonemergent surgeries, creating a global surgical backlog. We sought to estimate the size of the nonemergent surgical backlog during COVID-19 in Ontario, Canada, and the time and resources required to clear the backlog. METHODS: We used 6 Ontario or Canadian population administrative sources to obtain data covering part or all of the period between Jan. 1, 2017, and June 13, 2020, on historical volumes and operating room throughput distributions by surgery type and region, and lengths of stay in ward and intensive care unit (ICU) beds. We used time series forecasting, queuing models and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to estimate the size of the backlog and clearance time for a +10% (+1 day per week at 50% capacity) surge scenario. RESULTS: Between Mar. 15 and June 13, 2020, the estimated backlog in Ontario was 148 364 surgeries (95% prediction interval 124 508-174 589), an average weekly increase of 11 413 surgeries. Estimated backlog clearance time is 84 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI] 46-145), with an estimated weekly throughput of 717 patients (95% CI 326-1367) requiring 719 operating room hours (95% CI 431-1038), 265 ward beds (95% CI 87-678) and 9 ICU beds (95% CI 4-20) per week. INTERPRETATION: The magnitude of the surgical backlog from COVID-19 raises serious implications for the recovery phase in Ontario. Our framework for modelling surgical backlog recovery can be adapted to other jurisdictions, using local data to assist with planning.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Neoplasms/surgery , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Ontario , Operating Rooms/supply & distribution , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
16.
Eur J Pediatr Surg ; 31(5): 407-413, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733485

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Understanding the challenges experienced by pediatric surgeons in the early phases of the pandemic may help identify key issues and focus research. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two pediatric surgeons from each of the 10 countries most affected by COVID-19 were surveyed over a 10-day period. Data were obtained regarding service provision, infection control, specific surgical conditions, and the surgical workforce. RESULTS: Twenty pediatric surgeons responded. All centers had postponed non-emergency surgery and clinics for nonurgent conditions with virtual consultations being undertaken in 90% of centers. A majority (65%) of centers had not yet knowingly operated on a positive patient. Minimal access surgery was performed in 75% centers but a further 75% had reduced or stopped upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The management of simple appendicitis was unchanged in 70% centers, patients with intussusception were being referred for radiological reduction in all centers and definitive pull-through surgery for Hirschsprung patients was performed by 95% where washouts were successful. Timing of surgery for reducible neonatal inguinal hernias had changed in 55% of centers and the management of urgent feeding gastrostomy referrals and of inflammatory bowel disease patients failing with biological therapy varied considerably. CONCLUSION: Service provision has been severely affected by COVID-19 leading to an inevitable increase in untreated surgical pathology. Better understanding of extrapulmonary infectivity, the risk of asymptomatic carriage in children, and the reliability of testing for surgical scenarios may allow appropriate use of conventional surgery, including laparoscopy and endoscopy, and rational development of the novel care pathways needed during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Infection Control/methods , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Child , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 36(8): 925-931, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an unprecedented test on the delivery and management of healthcare services globally. This study describes the adaptive measures taken and evolving roles of the members of the paediatric surgery division in a developing country during this period. METHODS: We adopted multiple adaptive strategies including changes to stratification of surgeries, out-patient services by urgency and hospital alert status, policy writing involving multidisciplinary teams, and redeployment of manpower. Modifications were made to teaching activities and skills training to observe social distancing and mitigate reduced operative learning opportunities. Roles of academic staff were expanded to include non-surgical duties. RESULTS: The planned strategies and changes to pre COVID-19 practices were successful in ensuring minimal disruption to the delivery of essential paediatric surgical services and training. Despite the lack of established guidelines and literature outlining strategies to address the impact of this pandemic on surgical services, most of the initial measures employed were consistent with that of other surgical centres. CONCLUSION: Changes to delivery of surgical services and surgical training warrant a holistic approach and a constant re-evaluation of practices with emergence of new experiences and guidelines.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pediatrics/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care Facilities , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL