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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28884, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713780

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study analyzed the changes in the number of outpatients and disease presentation during the entirety of 2020, the period of COVID-19 pandemic.The average annual number of outpatient visits between 2017 and 2019 (before COVID-19) and the total number of outpatient visits in 2020 (COVID-19 period) were compared. Diagnostic codes were identified during 2 periods to analyze changes in the number of outpatient visits according to disease and month.The average annual number of outpatient visits was 47,105 before, and 40,786 during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a decrease of 13.4%. The number of outpatient visits in internal medicine decreased by 10.2% during the COVID-19 pandemic and tended to rebound during the second half of the year. However, the number of outpatient visits in the pediatric department decreased by 37.5% overall throughout the COVID-19 period and continued to decline in the second half of the year. The number of outpatients with infectious diseases decreased significantly (35.9%) compared to noninfectious diseases (cancer, 5.0%; circulatory disease, 4.1%). In addition, the number of outpatient visits due to viral diseases continued to decline, while the incidence of bacterial diseases increased rapidly in the second half of the year.This study confirmed that the number of outpatient visits due to bacterial or viral infections decreased throughout the COVID-19 crisis. Therefore, expanding public health and telemedicine services is necessary to prevent secondary health problems caused by essential medical use restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internal Medicine/organization & administration , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Internal Medicine/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Pediatrics/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
4.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 232, 2021 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630738

ABSTRACT

In this article, we describe the advances in the field of pediatrics that have been published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2020. We report progresses in understanding allergy, autoinflammatory disorders, critical care, endocrinology, genetics, infectious diseases, microbiota, neonatology, neurology, nutrition, orthopedics, respiratory tract illnesses, rheumatology in childhood.


Subject(s)
Pediatrics/trends , COVID-19 , Child Nutrition Sciences , Critical Care , Endocrinology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Infectious Disease Medicine , Neonatology , Neurology , Orthopedics , Rare Diseases , Respiratory Tract Diseases , Rheumatology
6.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 41-46, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF centers shifted to a telehealth delivery model. Our study aimed to determine how people with CF (PwCF) and their families experienced telehealth and assessed its quality and acceptability for future CF care. METHODS: The CF Patient and Family State of Care Survey (PFSoC) was fielded from August 31-October 30, 2020. The PFSoC explored themes of overall telehealth quality, ease of use, desirability, and preference for a future mix of in-person and telehealth care. Demographic covariates considered included: gender, age, CFTR modulator status, and region of residence. RESULTS: 424 PwCF and parents of PwCF responded (47% parents). Most (81%) reported a telehealth visit which included a MD/APP and nurse team members. 91% found telehealth easy to use, and 66% reported similar/higher quality than in-person care. One-third (34%) reported the highest desire for future telehealth care, with 45% (n =212) desiring 50% or more of visits conducted via telehealth. Adults were more likely than parents to report highest desire for future telehealth (64% vs. 36%). Respondents who perceived telehealth as similar/higher quality were more likely to desire future telehealth compared to those who perceived telehealth as lower quality (96% vs. 50%). Mixed methods analysis revealed themes affecting perceptions of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF desire for future telehealth was influenced by perception of quality and age. Several themes emerged that need to be explored as telehealth is adapted into the CF chronic care model, especially when thinking about integration into pediatric care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Family Health , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Models, Organizational , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Pediatrics/methods , Pediatrics/trends , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
9.
Pediatr Transplant ; 26(1): e14152, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and consequent lockdowns, the use of telehealth interventions has rapidly increased both in the general population and among transplant recipients. Among pediatric transplant recipients, this most frequently takes the form of interventions on mobile devices, or mHealth, such as remote visits via video chat or phone, phone-based monitoring, and mobile apps. Telehealth interventions may offer the opportunity to provide care that minimizes many of the barriers of in-person care. METHODS: The present review followed the PRISMA guidelines. Sources up until October 2020 were initially identified through searches of PsycInfo® and PubMed® . RESULTS: We identified ten papers that reported findings from adult interventions and five studies based in pediatrics. Eight of the adult publications stemmed from the same two trials; within the pediatric subset, this was the case for two papers. Studies that have looked at mHealth interventions have found high acceptability rates over the short run, but there is a general lack of data on long-term use. CONCLUSIONS: The literature surrounding pediatric trials specifically is sparse with all findings referencing interventions that are in early stages of development, ranging from field tests to small feasibility trials. The lack of research highlights the need for a multi-center RCT that utilizes robust measures of medication adherence and other outcome variables, with longer-term follow-up before telehealth interventions should be fully embraced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Organ Transplantation , Pediatrics/methods , Postoperative Care/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Attitude to Health , Canada , Child , Europe , Health Care Costs/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pediatrics/economics , Pediatrics/trends , Postoperative Care/economics , Postoperative Care/trends , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/trends , United States
10.
Adv Pediatr ; 67: xix-xx, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440415
13.
Neurol Clin ; 39(3): 699-704, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294076

ABSTRACT

The adaption of online or virtual technologies to deliver care, to meet professionally, and to interview has transformed child neurology. Although these technologies were brought to bear out of necessity, it is hoped that in a postpandemic world, these useful tools will continue to benefit the field. Here we discuss the tools and their future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Neurology , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurology/trends , Pediatrics/trends , Telemedicine/trends
14.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 140, 2021 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190098

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic and the measures implemented to stop the pandemic had a broad impact on our daily lives. Besides work and social life, health care is affected on many levels. In particular, there is concern that attendance in health care programs will drop or hospital admissions will be delayed due to COVID-19-related anxieties, especially in children. Therefore, we compared the number of weekly visits to 78 German pediatric institutions between 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: We found no significant differences during the first 10 weeks of the year. However, and importantly, from April, the weekly number of visits was more than 35% lower in 2020 than in 2019 (p = 0.005). In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic seems to relate to families´ utilization of outpatient well-child clinics and pediatric practice attendance in Germany.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Health Services/trends , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Pediatrics/trends , Child , Germany/epidemiology , Humans
16.
Pediatr Dermatol ; 38(2): 364-370, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142960

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: In spring 2020, high numbers of children presented with acral pernio-like skin rashes, concurrent with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Understanding their clinical characteristics/ infection status may provide prognostic information and facilitate decisions about management. METHODS: A pediatric-specific dermatology registry was created by the Pediatric Dermatology COVID-19 Response Task Force of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology (SPD) and Pediatric Dermatology Research Alliance (PeDRA) and was managed by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia using REDCap. RESULTS: Data from 378 children 0-18 years entered into the registry between April 13 and July 17, 2020 were analyzed. Data were drawn from a standardized questionnaire completed by clinicians which asked for demographics, description of acral lesions, symptoms before and after acral changes, COVID-19 positive contacts, treatment, duration of skin changes, laboratory testing including SARS-CoV-2 PCR and antibody testing, as well as histopathology. 229 (60.6%) were male with mean age of 13.0 years (± 3.6 years). Six (1.6%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Pedal lesions (often with pruritus and/or pain) were present in 96%. 30% (114/378) had COVID-19 symptoms during the 30 days prior to presentation. Most (69%) had no other symptoms and an uneventful course with complete recovery. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Children with acral pernio-like changes were healthy and all recovered with no short-term sequelae. We believe these acral changes are not just a temporal epiphenomenon of shelter in place during the spring months of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and may be a late phase reaction that needs further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/trends , Pediatrics/trends , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Philadelphia , Registries
18.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(5): 1029-1030, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046602
19.
Horm Res Paediatr ; 93(6): 343-350, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric endocrine practices had to rapidly transition to telemedicine care at the onset of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. For many, it was an abrupt introduction to providing virtual healthcare, with concerns related to quality of patient care, patient privacy, productivity, and compensation, as workflows had to change. SUMMARY: The review summarizes the common adaptations for telemedicine during the pandemic with respect to the practice of pediatric endocrinology and discusses the benefits and potential barriers to telemedicine. Key Messages: With adjustments to practice, telemedicine has allowed providers to deliver care to their patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. The broader implementation of telemedicine in pediatric endocrinology practice has the potential for expanding patient access. Research assessing the impact of telemedicine on patient care outcomes in those with pediatric endocrinology conditions will be necessary to justify its continued use beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Endocrinology/trends , Pediatrics/trends , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Pandemics
20.
Anesth Analg ; 134(2): 348-356, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of all health care workers. Anesthesiologists frequently perform virus-aerosolizing procedures (eg, intubation and extubation) that place them at increased risk of infection. We sought to determine how the initial COVID-19 outbreak affected members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) on both personal and professional levels. Specifically, we examined the potential effects of gender and age on personal stress, burnout, sleep deprivation, anxiety, depression, assessed job satisfaction, and explored financial impact. METHODS: After receiving approval from the SPA Committees for Research and Quality and Safety and the Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board, we e-mailed a questionnaire to all 3245 SPA members. The survey included 22 questions related to well-being and 13 questions related to effects of COVID-19 on current and future practice, finances, retirement planning, academic time and productivity, and clinical and home responsibilities. To address low initial response rates and quantify nonresponse bias, we sent a shortened follow-up survey to a randomly selected subsample (n = 100) of SPA members who did not respond to the initial survey. Response differences between the 2 cohorts were determined. RESULTS: A total of 561 (17%) members responded to the initial questionnaire. Because of COVID-19, 21.7% of respondents said they would change their clinical responsibilities, and 10.6% would decrease their professional working time. Women were more likely than men to anticipate a future COVID-19-related job change (odds ratio [OR] = 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.63; P = .011), perhaps because of increased home responsibilities (OR = 2.63, 95% CI, 1.74-4.00; P < .001). Additionally, 14.2% of respondents planned to retire early, and 11.9% planned to retire later. Women and non-White respondents had higher likelihoods of burnout on univariate analysis (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.06-2.94, P = .026 and OR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.08-3.04, P = .017, respectively), and 25.1% of all respondents felt socially isolated. In addition, both changes in retirement planning and future occupational planning were strongly associated with total job satisfaction scores (both P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the personal and professional lives of pediatric anesthesiologists, albeit not equally, as women and non-Whites have been disproportionately impacted. The pandemic has significantly affected personal finances, home responsibilities, and retirement planning; reduced clinical and academic practice time and responsibilities; and increased feelings of social isolation, stress, burnout, and depression/anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/psychology , Anesthesiologists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Pediatrics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Anesthesia/trends , Anesthesiologists/trends , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pediatrics/trends , Retirement/trends , Societies, Medical/trends
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