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1.
J Nurs Educ ; 61(4): 213-216, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780110

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Peer assessment rubrics (PARs) facilitate equitable distribution of responsibility among group members and help educators assess learners' contributions. This study sought to (1) address health science students' attitudes toward group work and peer assessment, (2) apply evidence-based recommendations and student suggestions to the adaptation of a PAR, and (3) determine the rubric's effectiveness for educators and acceptability among students. METHOD: A PAR was identified, modified, and tested with graduate students (N = 502) in the health sciences. RESULTS: Compared with prior PARs, graduate students rated this rubric as easier to use and more helpful in assessing peers' contributions and explaining their ratings. Educators reported the PAR's utility with diverse health science students across both in-person and virtual platforms. CONCLUSION: Using a PAR that is acceptable to students and useful for faculty may contribute to more meaningful interprofessional experiences, ultimately preparing students for effective interprofessional collaboration. [J Nurs Educ. 2022;61(4):213-216.].


Subject(s)
Learning , Peer Group , Humans , Interprofessional Relations
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 719640, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775833

ABSTRACT

Background: Families are integrally involved in day-to-day caregiving of children with neurodevelopmental and intellectual disabilities (NDID). Given the widespread and increasing prevalence of children with NDID and the impact of family caregiving on psychological, social, and economic implications for both the child and family, understanding and supporting these families is an important public health concern. Objective: We conducted a scoping review on peer support networks to understand their implications on families. Considering increasing prevalence of NDID's, understanding the implications of existing networks is critical to improve and nurture future support networks that can complement and reduce the burden on existing formal support systems. Design: A comprehensive search of multiple databases was conducted. Articles were screened by two reviewers and any disagreements were resolved by a third reviewer. We explored existing research on parent-to-parent peer support networks, which included networks that developed informally as well as those that involved a formal facilitator for the group interpersonal processes. There were no limits on the study design, date and setting of the articles. We included all research studies in English that included an identifier for (i) "peer support networks," (ii) "children with neurodevelopmental and intellectual disabilities" and (iii) "family caregiver outcomes." Results: We identified 36 articles. Majority of the studies were conducted in North America, and were face to face networks. They included families of children with a wide range of NDIDs. Relevant information extracted from different studies highlighted peer support network characteristics and development process, needs of family caregivers attending these networks, factors affecting caregiver participation and the impact of peer support networks on family caregivers. These networks represent a way to strengthen family caregivers, developing resilience and social interactions. Family caregivers sharing similar experiences support one another and provide critical information to each other. Although results are encouraging, future studies incorporating improved study designs are needed to better evaluate the effectiveness of peer support networks. Furthermore, studies where peer support networks develop organically while the child is supported are warranted. Conclusion: Although results obtained are encouraging, our findings support the need for further research studies of peer support networks with better designs and more detailed description of the factors involved in the development.


Subject(s)
Family , Peer Group , Social Support , Child , Family/psychology , Humans , Intellectual Disability , Neurodevelopmental Disorders
3.
J Agromedicine ; 27(1): 109-111, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662015
5.
J Prof Nurs ; 39: 19-25, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620978

ABSTRACT

Academic demands challenge many nursing students as they embark on their professional journey to become competent nurses or further their education. Challenges with incorporating successful retention strategies were problematic during the worldwide COVID-19 public health emergency. Academic student support services were urgently needed. This article describes the successful development of a funded college campus's academic support service center using virtual nurse educator tutoring services for undergraduate and graduate nursing students. The mission of the center is to assist nursing students to become independent, self-confident, and efficient learners who successfully fulfill all academic nursing program requirements. Evidence-based education was provided to train tutors and refine their technology competencies. Tutoring was provided for graduate students to fulfill the need for similar types of academic support services. Metrics were collected to evaluate the relationship between tutoring and academic success indicators. Initial evaluations of tutoring sessions by tutees suggest that peer tutoring as an adjunctive teaching and learning strategy can positively impact academic performance. Findings included improved student quantitative measures including higher exam scores and GPAs along with qualitative outcomes suggesting increased critical thinking skills, self-direction, and self-confidence. Nurse educator student tutors gained valuable teaching experience that promoted their overall academic role development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260555, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546958

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In June 2021, United Nations (UN) Member States committed to ambitious targets for scaling up community-led responses by 2025 toward meeting the goals of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030. These targets build on UN Member States 2016 commitments to ensure that 30% of HIV testing and treatment programmes are community-led by 2030. At its current pace, the world is not likely to meet these nor other global HIV targets, as evidenced by current epidemiologic trends. The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to further slow momentum made to date. The purpose of this paper is to review available evidence on the comparative advantages of community-led HIV responses that can better inform policy making towards getting the world back on track. METHODS: We conducted a scoping review to gather available evidence on peer- and community-led HIV responses. Using UNAIDS' definition of 'community-led' and following PRISMA guidelines, we searched peer-reviewed literature published from January 1982 through September 2020. We limited our search to articles reporting findings from randomized controlled trials as well as from quasi-experimental, prospective, pre/post-test evaluation, and cross-sectional study designs. The overall goals of this scoping review were to gather available evidence on community-led responses and their impact on HIV outcomes, and to identify key concepts that can be used to quickly inform policy, practice, and research. FINDINGS: Our initial search yielded 279 records. After screening for relevance and conducting cross-validation, 48 articles were selected. Most studies took place in the global south (n = 27) and a third (n = 17) involved youth. Sixty-five percent of articles (n = 31) described the comparative advantage of peer- and community-led direct services, e.g., prevention and education (n = 23) testing, care, and treatment programs (n = 8). We identified more than 40 beneficial outcomes linked to a range of peer- and community-led HIV activities. They include improved HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, intentions, self-efficacy, risk behaviours, risk appraisals, health literacy, adherence, and viral suppression. Ten studies reported improvements in HIV service access, quality, linkage, utilization, and retention resulting from peer- or community-led programs or initiatives. Three studies reported structural level changes, including positive influences on clinic wait times, treatment stockouts, service coverage, and exclusionary practices. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Findings from our scoping review underscore the comparative advantage of peer- and community-led HIV responses. Specifically, the evidence from the published literature leads us to recommend, where possible, that prevention programs, especially those intended for people living with and disproportionately affected by HIV, be peer- and community-led. In addition, treatment services should strive to integrate specific peer- and community-led components informed by differentiated care models. Future research is needed and should focus on generating additional quantitative evidence on cost effectiveness and on the synergistic effects of bundling two or more peer- and community-led interventions.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/standards , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy , Humans , Medication Adherence , Peer Group , Risk-Taking , Self Efficacy , United Nations
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1279, 2021 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Peer workers (those with lived/living experience of substance use working in overdose response settings) are at the forefront of overdose response initiatives in British Columbia (BC). Working in these settings can be stressful, with lasting social, mental and emotional impacts. Peer workers have also been disproportionately burdened by the current dual public health crises characterized by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and rise in illicit drug overdose deaths. It is therefore critical to develop supports tailored specifically to their realities. METHODS: We used the six steps outlined in the Intervention Mapping (IM) framework to identify needs of peer workers and design an intervention model to support peer workers in overdose response settings. RESULTS: Eight peer-led focus groups were conducted in community settings to identify peer workers' needs and transcripts were analyzed using interpretive description. The strategies within the intervention model were informed by organizational development theory as well as by lived/living experience of peer workers. The support needs identified by peer workers were categorized into three key themes and these formed the basis of an intervention model titled 'ROSE'; R stands for Recognition of peer work, O for Organizational support, S for Skill development and E for Everyone. The ROSE model aims to facilitate cultural changes within organizations, leading towards more equitable and just workplaces for peer workers. This, in turn, has the potential for positive socio-ecological impact. CONCLUSIONS: Centering lived/living experience in the intervention mapping process led us to develop a framework for supporting peer workers in BC. The ROSE model can be used as a baseline for other organizations employing peer workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug Overdose , Substance-Related Disorders , Drug Overdose/epidemiology , Drug Overdose/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: loneliness is a common experience for adolescents, yet the voices of adolescents are missing from current conceptualisations of loneliness. That means, measures that have been created based on current conceptualisations may miss important contexts of adolescence, such as the roles of friendships, that determine the way loneliness is experienced. The current study aims to centre adolescent voices to identify how they conceptualise loneliness and what strategies they consider to be useful for adolescents to cope with loneliness. METHOD: thematic framework analysis (TFA) was conducted on qualitative interviews with young people aged 8-14 years in Belgium and Italy to identify salient themes in their conceptualisations of loneliness. RESULTS: Loneliness was conceptualised as a negative emotional state involving negative thinking patterns that occurs when an individual perceives they are missing out on a desired aspect in their social relationships. Coping strategies related to alleviating negative affect, and aiding social reconnection. CONCLUSIONS: friendships with peers were understood to be central to adolescent loneliness experiences. In line with that, loneliness was seen to be experienced at school. Age-related differences in friendship expectations were identified, highlighting how developmental needs relate to the loneliness experience.


Subject(s)
Friends , Loneliness , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Peer Group
9.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1706-1710, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528193

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: In March 2020, medical students at the University of Washington School of Medicine were removed from clinical settings in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. As subinternships are required for graduation and an important way to prepare for internship, a virtual subinternship was created to include practical elements of in-person learning and to address limited teaching faculty from COVID-19 inpatient surges. APPROACH: A virtual, interactive subinternship was developed with case-based teaching sessions, communication and critical literature evaluation skill building, professional development, and creation of independent learning plans. Near-peer teachers (NPTs) were selected from graduating senior medical students who matched into internal medicine. In addition to teaching topics from the Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine curriculum, NPTs engaged in course development, recruited teaching faculty, gathered feedback, and facilitated small groups. Participating students completed pre- and postcourse surveys. OUTCOMES: The 10 students (100%) enrolled in the course who completed both surveys indicated significant improvement in mean scores across 4 domains: evaluating medical literature (3.1/5 to 4.5/5; +1.4, P < .001); developing individual learning plans (3.6/5 to 4.7/5; +1.1, P = .001); perceived ability to efficiently evaluate patients with common internal medicine concerns (3.7/5 to 4.6/5; +0.9, P = .004); and formulating initial diagnostic and therapeutic plans (3.6/5 to 4.6/5; +1.0, P < .001). Themes extracted from open-ended responses included initial skepticism of an online format, the course exceeding expectations, and feeling prepared for internship. NEXT STEPS: Although a virtual subinternship lacks direct patient care, students reported improvement in all 4 domains studied. Future courses would benefit from greater use of simulation and role-playing scenarios for practical skills. The experience with NPTs was encouraging, aiding in the success of the subinternship. The role of NPTs should be cultivated to fill gaps in content delivery and enhance the development of students as educators.


Subject(s)
Internal Medicine/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Peer Group , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526815

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studying prosociality in children is a complex but relevant issue related to the qualitative development of human interactions. The main objective of the present study is to identify the psychosocial factors that most promote or inhibit the adoption of prosocial behaviours among children. METHOD: In Spring 2021, a survey was conducted amongst primary school children through a structured paper questionnaire. The data analysis has been carried out through bivariate and multivariate statistical techniques. Path analysis has been used. RESULTS: The results highlight the role played by the parental education level, the perception of positive and negative emotions, the adherence to gender roles and the involvement in cyberbullying actions in predicting prosocial tendencies among children. On the other hand, adopting prosocial behaviours affects the screen-time as well as the devices' interference in face-to-face interactions and the attitude towards school. CONCLUSIONS: The results are relevant and useful for the study of trends in prosocial behaviours among children. Family education level, individual status, peer interactions and social conditionings are variables that highly influence this multidimensional phenomenon. Further research is needed, including the definition of new measures and indicators concerning the context where children live and interact with others, with the aim of designing interventions aimed at facilitating relational well-being of children.


Subject(s)
Altruism , Socialization , Child , Humans , Peer Group , Schools , Social Behavior , Students
11.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc7, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503862

ABSTRACT

Background: Within days, the corona crisis has forced the "Lernzentrum", as well as all other places of training and further education, to discontinue classroom teaching at German universities and vocational schools. In order to start teaching online, tutors had to face the challenge to develop new digital learning formats (virtual classrooms) for the peer teaching of practical skills within a short time. This paper aims at outlining the project of developing e-tutorials with regard to the teaching of practical skills. Methodology: After analyzing the classroom lessons (n=30), some of the tutorials were transformed into digital formats. These so-called "e-tutorials" were held via a digital platform. They have been evaluated continuously with a standardized online questionnaire. The results of this evaluation have been analyzed descriptively. Results: From 27/04/2020 to 17/07/2020 eleven different e-tutorial formats were offered on 246 dates. The evaluation revealed a high degree of acceptance with these course offers as well as with the implementation by the tutors. Interpretation: During the pandemic crisis the substitution of peer teaching into forms of e-tutorials was considered valuable; however, these learning formats present challenges, especially with regard to the interaction between teachers and students. They cannot therefore fully replace the peer teaching of practical skills.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Teaching , Universities , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/standards , Germany , Humans , Peer Group , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/standards
12.
Clin Anat ; 35(1): 129-134, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499232

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to analyze differences in participation, and in the results obtained in the anatomy and histology exams, over two academic years of the Sport Sciences degree course. During the first semester of the academic year 2019/2020 both the lectures and the exam took place face-to-face, while during the academic year 2020/2021 everything was done online. Statistical analysis revealed that the online modality was especially advantageous for the anatomy exam. Students' opinions were also assessed through a short questionnaire. The results showed that teachers involved themselves in both groups. Students needed to interact socially with teachers and colleagues and to ask them questions. Even if the differences were not significant, the difference was greater for face-to-face students in most comparisons. Finally, the most common methods of peer communication were by social media.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Anatomy/education , Humans , Pandemics , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 557, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pakistan has not been a major contributor to medical research, mainly because of the lack of learning opportunities to medical students. With the increase in online learning systems during COVID-19, research related skills can be taught to medical students via low-cost peer taught virtual research workshops. AIM OF THE STUDY: To assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive low-cost peer-taught virtual research workshops amongst medical students in Pakistan. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study assessed the effectiveness of five virtual research workshops (RWs) in improving core research skills. RWs for medical students from across Pakistan were conducted over Zoom by medical students (peer-teachers) at the Aga Khan University, Pakistan, with minimal associated costs. The content of the workshops included types of research, ethical approval and research protocols, data collection and analysis, manuscript writing, and improving networking skills for research. Improvement was assessed via pre-and post-quizzes for each RW, self-efficacy scores across 16 domains, and feedback forms. Minimum criteria for completion of the RW series was attending at least 4/5 RWs and filling the post-RW series feedback form. A 6-month post-RW series follow-up survey was also emailed to the participants. RESULTS: Four hundred medical students from 36 (/117; 30.8%) different medical colleges in Pakistan were enrolled in the RWs. However, only 307/400 (76.75%) medical students met the minimum requirement for completion of the RW series. 56.4% of the participants belonged to the pre-clinical years while the rest were currently to clinical years. The cohort demonstrated significant improvement in pre-and post-quiz scores for all 5 RWs (p <  0.001) with the greatest improvement in Data Collection and Analysis (+ 34.65%), and in self-efficacy scores across all domains (p <  0.001). 166/307 (54.1%) participants responded to the 6 months post-RWs follow-up survey. Compared to pre-RWs, Research involvement increased from 40.4 to 62.8% (p <  0.001) while proportion of participants with peer-reviewed publications increased from 8.4 to 15.8% (p = 0.043). CONCLUSION: Virtual RWs allow for a wide outreach while effectively improving research-related knowledge and skills, with minimal associated costs. In lower-middle-income countries, virtual RWs are a creative and cost-effective use of web-based technologies to facilitate medical students to contribute to the local and global healthcare research community.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Peer Group , Students, Medical , Humans , Pakistan
14.
Br J Nurs ; 30(19): 1132-1139, 2021 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an increasing body of evidence that identifies psychological stressors associated with working in emergency medicine. Peer Assessment After Clinical Exposure (PACE) is a structured programme designed to support staff following traumatic or chronic work-related stressful exposure. The first author of this study created the PACE programme and implemented it in one emergency department (ED). AIM: A service evaluation designed to explore the thoughts and experiences of the staff who accessed the PACE support service. METHOD: Participants were selected by a non-probability convenience strategy to represent the ED staff population. The study cohort ranged from junior staff nurse level to emergency consultant. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview and examined by the method of interpretative phenomenological analysis. FINDINGS: This study confirmed the findings of previous research that current pressures within the ED include crowding, time pressure and working within an uncontrollable environment. Eight participants identified an absence of previous emotional support resulting in dissociation and avoidance behaviours following traumatic exposure. Overall, the PACE service was well received by the majority of staff (11/12). There was a positive association with the one-to-one element and the educational component helped to reduce the stigma associated with stress reactions after work-related exposure. CONCLUSION: PACE received a positive response from staff. This service presently does not exist elsewhere in the NHS so further research will be needed to evaluate its long-term impact and effectiveness on a wider scale.


Subject(s)
Emergency Medical Services , Consultants , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Peer Group , Stress, Psychological
15.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 131: 108649, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492337

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected underserved, low-income, ethnoracial minority communities, as well as those with substance use disorders (SUDs). The workforce of peer recovery specialists (PRSs), individuals with lived substance use and recovery experience, has rapidly expanded in response to a shortage of access to substance use treatment, particularly for those from underserved communities. As PRSs are likely serving individuals disproportionately affected by the pandemic, it is important to understand how COVID-19 has affected the PRS role and the individuals with SUD who they are supporting. METHOD: This study aimed to examine: (1) the impact of COVID-19 on the PRS role and experience, (2) the impact of COVID-19 on clients in or seeking SUD treatment, (3) facilitators for clients engaging in treatment and adapting to new changes, and (4) sustainability of new treatment methods post-pandemic. RESULTS: Findings suggest that PRSs have had to adapt their role and responsibilities to meet changing client needs; however, PRS strengths, such as their shared experience and expertise navigating treatment barriers, make them uniquely suited to assist clients during the pandemic. The study identified various barriers and facilitators to clients seeking treatment or living with SUD, such as the loss of interpersonal connection. PRSs also identified some drawbacks to utilizing telehealth, but identified this as a potentially sustainable approach to delivering care after the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Future research could explore how challenges to fulfilling the PRS role, as well as adaptations to overcome these challenges, have changed over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Substance-Related Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology
16.
J Dent Educ ; 86(2): 154-160, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427123

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine whether peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a more effective learning and test method in terms of oral- and maxillofacial surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In July 2020, a total of 267 students took a PAL-based exam on fictional patients with surgical issues, in which they had to evaluate two fellow students and were themselves evaluated by two fellow students. The students evaluated their experience with the PAL-based exam through a questionnaire which consisted of five given statements (answer possibilities: agree, disagree, neutral) and two questions (answer possibilities: better, equal, worse) to rate. RESULTS: In the survey, 77.9% of the students rated PAL as a better learning method and 21% rated it as at least equally effective to the known multiple-choice (MC) test. A total of 74.9% of the students indicated that they learned more content with PAL and 20.2% said they learned the same amount; 83.7% said that their "clinical thinking has improved" through PAL. In the comments, 73% of the students noted that they think PAL is a good learning method, and at least 22% rated it as useful but in need of improvements. Only 5% did not see PAL as an acceptable learning method. In contrast to this, 1.3% saw PAL as a "bad alternative to MC tests." CONCLUSION: PAL, especially peer assessment, might represent a better learning method as it might encourage students to deal more intensively with the learning content and to improve clinical thinking.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
17.
Nurse Educ Today ; 107: 105131, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401731

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the drastic change in the nursing education environment due to the coronavirus pandemic, several attempts have been made in Korea to help nursing students better adapt to the new learning environment. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore nursing students' experience of online peer tutoring based on the Goal-Reality-Options-Will (GROW) model. DESIGN: A qualitative study using content analysis. SETTINGS: This study was conducted in the department of nursing at two universities in South Korea. PARTICIPANTS: The participants were 14 nursing students who participated as tutors and tutees in the online peer tutoring. METHODS: Three focus group interviews were conducted with the 14 students. Data were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: Three categories and nine subcategories were extracted. Online peer tutoring allowed participants to learn using a new approach, promoted their efficiency of studying in multiple aspects, and encouraged them to persevere and advance in academics, thus proving its usefulness as an auxiliary strategy to enhance the efficiency of online learning. CONCLUSIONS: Structured online peer tutoring can be a useful tool for enhancing the effectiveness of non-face-to-face education for nursing students. This study's results can serve as meaningful basic data for planning and composing learning activities optimized for the future online nursing education environment.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Humans , Learning , Peer Group , Qualitative Research
19.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc4, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389118

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the ban on classroom teaching during the pandemic, the Munich "Anamnesegruppen" had to be switched to e-learning at short notice. There were no established concepts for this, which is why digitalization was piloted and evaluated for feasibility. Student "Anamnesegruppen": "Anamnesegruppen" have existed for over 50 years and are organized as independent student peer teaching. In small groups of medical and psychology students, interviews with patients are conducted once a week during the semester. This is followed by a feedback and discussion round, in which ethical and professional questions are discussed in addition to the patient's medical history. The goal is to train the participants' ability to communicate and reflect. Adaptation to digital methods: The anamnesis seminars have been moved to a virtual group room using video conference. Patients were mainly recruited from the participants' circle of acquaintances. The group size was set at eight people each in four groups and supervised by a pair of student tutors. Confidentiality and data protection declarations were obtained in writing. Results: By switching to digital anamnesis groups, all four groups were successfully completed. Both the final supervision of the tutors and the electronic evaluation of the participants yielded positive feedback. Compared to the two previous evaluations of the semesters in classroom sessions, there were no significant differences in the evaluation. Discussion: The continuously good evaluation results, which did not differ between the digital format and the classroom course of the previous semesters, show that an ad hoc conversion to digital teaching is possible. We want to stress the fact that elements reflecting the doctor-patient relationship were successfully preserved. For the similarly structured Balint groups, virtual sessions may also be considered. Further research, especially prospective, is desirable in order to better understand the possibilities of digital teaching in this area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Peer Group , Physician-Patient Relations , Teaching/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Communication , Group Processes , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Psychiatr Rehabil J ; 44(4): 305-309, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354079

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Peer respites are recovery-oriented services where people who identify as having lived experience of extreme mental health states (peers) support individuals experiencing, or at risk of, crises in a homelike environment. This brief report describes data from the Peer Respite Essential Features survey, conducted biannually from 2014 to 2020, which explores the peer respite model and program challenges. METHOD: Peer respites nationwide were invited to participate if they met specific guidelines, resulting in 32 programs across 14 states in 2020. RESULTS: Results focus on the data collected in 2020 and compare past reports where applicable. Characteristics including funding, guest accommodations and policies, and how the programs were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: More research is needed to understand the relationship between program characteristics and effectiveness of peer respites compared to other crisis diversion services and how to better support these growing programs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Peer Group , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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