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1.
Glycobiology ; 32(1): 60-72, 2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501077

ABSTRACT

Extensive glycosylation of the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus not only shields the major part of it from host immune responses, but glycans at specific sites also act on its conformation dynamics and contribute to efficient host receptor binding, and hence infectivity. As variants of concern arise during the course of the coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic, it is unclear if mutations accumulated within the spike protein would affect its site-specific glycosylation pattern. The Alpha variant derived from the D614G lineage is distinguished from others by having deletion mutations located right within an immunogenic supersite of the spike N-terminal domain (NTD) that make it refractory to most neutralizing antibodies directed against this domain. Despite maintaining an overall similar structural conformation, our mass spectrometry-based site-specific glycosylation analyses of similarly produced spike proteins with and without the D614G and Alpha variant mutations reveal a significant shift in the processing state of N-glycans on one specific NTD site. Its conversion to a higher proportion of complex type structures is indicative of altered spatial accessibility attributable to mutations specific to the Alpha variant that may impact its transmissibility. This and other more subtle changes in glycosylation features detected at other sites provide crucial missing information otherwise not apparent in the available cryogenic electron microscopy-derived structures of the spike protein variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Glycopeptides/chemistry , Mutation , Polysaccharides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Carbohydrate Sequence , Datasets as Topic , Glycopeptides/genetics , Glycopeptides/metabolism , Glycosylation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Peptide Mapping , Polysaccharides/metabolism , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
2.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 225, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387490

ABSTRACT

Serodiagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection is impeded by immunological cross-reactivity among the human coronaviruses (HCoVs): SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV, OC43, 229E, HKU1, and NL63. Here we report the identification of humoral immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 peptides that may enable discrimination between exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and other HCoVs. We used a high-density peptide microarray and plasma samples collected at two time points from 50 subjects with SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by qPCR, samples collected in 2004-2005 from 11 subjects with IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-1, 11 subjects with IgG antibodies to other seasonal human coronaviruses (HCoV), and 10 healthy human subjects. Through statistical modeling with linear regression and multidimensional scaling we identified specific peptides that were reassembled to identify 29 linear SARS-CoV-2 epitopes that were immunoreactive with plasma from individuals who had asymptomatic, mild or severe SARS-CoV-2 infections. Larger studies will be required to determine whether these peptides may be useful in serodiagnostics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Peptide Mapping , Peptides/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Chiroptera , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Peptides/chemistry , Proteome/metabolism
3.
Science ; 373(6559): 1109-1116, 2021 Sep 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341301

ABSTRACT

The spillovers of betacoronaviruses in humans and the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants highlight the need for broad coronavirus countermeasures. We describe five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) cross-reacting with the stem helix of multiple betacoronavirus spike glycoproteins isolated from COVID-19 convalescent individuals. Using structural and functional studies, we show that the mAb with the greatest breadth (S2P6) neutralizes pseudotyped viruses from three different subgenera through the inhibition of membrane fusion, and we delineate the molecular basis for its cross-reactivity. S2P6 reduces viral burden in hamsters challenged with SARS-CoV-2 through viral neutralization and Fc-mediated effector functions. Stem helix antibodies are rare, oftentimes of narrow specificity, and can acquire neutralization breadth through somatic mutations. These data provide a framework for structure-guided design of pan-betacoronavirus vaccines eliciting broad protection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Virus Internalization , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Neutralizing/isolation & purification , Convalescence , Cricetinae , Cross Reactions , Humans , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/immunology , Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments/immunology , Jurkat Cells , Lung/immunology , Membrane Fusion/immunology , Neutralization Tests , Peptide Mapping , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Load/immunology
4.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(590)2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136061

ABSTRACT

Long-term immunological memory to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is crucial for the development of population-level immunity, which is the aim of vaccination approaches. Reports on rapidly decreasing antibody titers have led to questions regarding the efficacy of humoral immunity alone. The relevance of T cell memory after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains unclear. Here, we investigated SARS-CoV-2 antibody and T cell responses in matched samples of COVID-19 convalescent individuals up to 6 months after infection. Longitudinal analysis revealed decreasing and stable spike- and nucleocapsid-specific antibody responses, respectively. In contrast, functional T cell responses remained robust, and even increased, in both frequency and intensity. Single peptide mapping of T cell diversity over time identified open reading frame-independent, dominant T cell epitopes mediating long-term SARS-CoV-2 T cell responses. Identification of these epitopes may be fundamental for COVID-19 vaccine design.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Convalescence , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Immunodominant Epitopes/immunology , Kinetics , Peptide Mapping , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
5.
ACS Infect Dis ; 6(12): 3269-3276, 2020 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933654

ABSTRACT

A high resolution mass spectrometry approach has been applied for the first time to detect and characterize SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in cell cultured and nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Peptide ions for three of the most abundant structural viral proteins (membrane, nucleocapid, and spike) are detected and assigned directly, by virtue of the high resolution and mass accuracy within the mass maps of whole virus digests, without the need for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MALDI-MS based approaches offer high sample throughput and speed, compared with those of LC-MS strategies, and detection limits at some 105 copies, or orders of magnitude less with selected ion monitoring, that compete favorably with conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) strategies. The detection of signature peptides unique to SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus over those from the influenza virus allows for its unambiguous detection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Peptide Mapping/methods , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Proteolysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
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