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1.
Kardiol Pol ; 80(3): 266-277, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766359

ABSTRACT

ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is one of the cardiac emergencies whose management has been most challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients presenting with the "lethal combo" of STEMI and concomitant SARS-CoV-2 infection have faced dramatic issues related to the need for self-isolation, systemic inflammation with multi-organ disease and difficulties to obtain timely diagnosis and treatment. The interplay between these and other factors has partly neutralized the major advances in STEMI care achieved in the last decades, significantly impairing prognosis in these patients. In the present review article, we will provide an overview on mechanisms of myocardial injury, specific clinical and angiographic characteristics and contemporary management in different settings of STEMI patients with COVID-19, alongside the inherent implications in terms of in-hospital mortality and short-term clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
2.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 22(12 Suppl 2): 4-15, 2021 12.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765600

ABSTRACT

Minimization of hospital lengths of stay has always been a key goal for healthcare systems. More so during the current COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, we have faced a reduction in no-COVID-19 admissions with the generation of huge backlogs. Low-risk patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be candidate for short-term hospitalization, with consequent reduction of waiting lists. Several single-center and multicenter observational studies, multiple randomized trials and some meta-analyses have addressed this topic.In this position paper, we present a proposal for short hospitalization for elective PCI procedures in selected patients who present complications only exceptionally and exclusively immediately after the procedure, if the inclusion and exclusion criteria are met. Each Center can choose between admission in day surgery or one day surgery, extending hospital length of stay only for patients who present complications or who are candidate for urgent surgery. Short-term hospitalization considerably reduces costs even if, with the current model, it generally results in a parallel reduction in reimbursement. Hence, we present an actual model, already tested successfully in an Italian hospital, that warrants sustainability. This approach can then be tailored to single Centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics/prevention & control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects
5.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e052000, 2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736067

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) that occur while already in hospital ('in-hospital STEMI') face high mortality. However, data about this patient population are scarce. We sought to investigate differences in reperfusion and outcomes of in-hospital versus out-of-hospital STEMI. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive patients with STEMI all treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) across 30 centres were prospectively recruited into the Victorian Cardiac Outcomes Registry (2013-2018). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Patients with in-hospital STEMI were compared with patients with out-of-hospital STEMI with a primary endpoint of 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Secondary endpoints included ischaemic times, all-cause mortality and major bleeding. RESULTS: Of 7493 patients with PCI-treated STEMI, 494 (6.6%) occurred in-hospital. Patients with in-hospital STEMI were older (67.1 vs 62.4 years, p<0.001), more often women (32% vs 19.9%, p<0.001), with more comorbidities. Patients with in-hospital STEMI had higher 30-day MACE (20.4% vs 9.8%, p<0.001), mortality (12.1% vs 6.9%, p<0.001) and major bleeding (4.9% vs 2.3%, p<0.001), than patients with out-of-hospital STEMI. According to guideline criteria, patients with in-hospital STEMI achieved symptom-to-device times of ≤70 min and ≤90 min in 29% and 47%, respectively. Patients with out-of-hospital STEMI achieved door-to-device times of ≤90 min in 71%. Occurrence of STEMI while in hospital independently predicted higher MACE (adjusted OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.36, p<0.001) and 12-month mortality (adjusted OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.07, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with in-hospital STEMI experience delays to reperfusion with significantly higher MACE and mortality, compared with patients with out-of-hospital STEMI, after adjustment for confounders. Focused strategies are needed to improve recognition and outcomes in this high-risk and understudied population.


Subject(s)
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Registries , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
6.
Hematology ; 27(1): 318-321, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713441

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated adverse drug reaction associated with thrombosis. Clinical scoring systems and the presence of anti-platelet factor 4 (anti-PF4)/heparin antibodies determine the diagnosis. CASE PRESENTATION: A 57-year-old man who was treated with acenocoumarol due to a chronic left ventricular thrombus was admitted to the hospital for severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and pulmonary embolism. The patient was started on bemiparin and discharged. Left lower limb acute arterial ischemia and thrombocytopenia were diagnosed 18 days later. Computed tomography angiography revealed a large left ventricular thrombus and multiple arterial thrombi. Left femoral-popliteal thromboembolectomy was performed. Anti-PF4/heparin antibodies confirmed an HIT diagnosis. Fondaparinux (7.5 mg/24 h) was initiated, but cardiac surgery was necessary. Bivalirudin was used during surgery, with an initial load (1.25 mg/kg) and maintenance infusion (2.5 mg/kg/h). The cardiac thrombus was extracted, but the patient experienced a postsurgical myocardial infarction. Percutaneous cardiovascular intervention (PCI) required a bivalirudin load (0.75 mg/kg) and maintenance infusion (1.75 mg/kg/h). No coronary lesions were detected, and argatroban was started afterwards (0.5 µg/kg/min). When the platelet count exceeded 100 × 109/L, acenocoumarol was initiated. Thereupon, acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/24 h) was added. No other complications have been reported to date. CONCLUSION: The clinical presentation of intraventricular and multiple arterial thrombi is remarkable. SARS-CoV-2 infection likely contributed to a hypercoagulable state. The management of patients with HIT undergoing cardiac surgery is challenging. If surgery cannot be delayed, then treatment with bivalirudin is recommended. Additionally, this drug is recommended for PCI. Bivalirudin is safe and well-tolerated in both procedures.


Subject(s)
Acenocoumarol/administration & dosage , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Arginine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Heparin , Hirudins/administration & dosage , Peptide Fragments/administration & dosage , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Pipecolic Acids/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Arginine/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , Heparin/administration & dosage , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/therapy , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Thrombosis/therapy
7.
Anatol J Cardiol ; 26(2): 118-126, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Global studies report a significant decline in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) related hospitalization rates during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak. However, there have been several divergent reports on hospital outcomes. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of the COVID 19 outbreak on hospitalizations because of STEMI and in-hospital outcomes in Albania. METHODS: This was a retrograde study, collecting data for hospitalizations because of STEMI from March 9, (first COVID 19 case in our country) to April 30, 2020, (period of total lockdown) compared with the same period in 2019 at our center. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was used to compare admissions because of STEMI and procedures and the risk ratio (RR) to compare mortality and other complication rates. RESULTS: Admissions for STEMI declined during the COVID-19 period from a total of 217 in 2019 to 156 in 2020 (-28.1%) representing IRR 0.719 (p=0.033). PCIs also reduced from 168 procedures in 2019 to 113 in 2020 (-33%), representing an IRR of 0.67, p=0.021. The time from symptom onset to arrival at our intensive care unit was significantly higher in 2020 compared to 2019 (925.6±1097 vs. 438.7±385 minutes, p<0.001). The STEMI death rate during the pandemic compared to the control period was significantly increased to 14.1% vs. 7.8% (RR=1.91 p=0.037, but with no significant increase in primary PCI-STEMI death rate (8.9% vs. 4.8% RR=1.85 p=0.217). Cardiogenic shock also increased during the pandemic to 21.2% from 12.4% in 2019 (RR=1.70 p=0.025). CONCLUSION: Hospitalizations and revascularization procedures for STEMI significantly reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic. We identified a substantial increase in the STEMI mortality rate and cardiogenic shock during the pandemic outbreak. Delayed timely reperfusion intervention might be responsible for the increased risk for complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Eur Heart J ; 43(5): 377-386, 2022 Feb 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684594

ABSTRACT

Since last year's report in the European Heart Journal, we have witnessed substantial progress in all aspects of interventional cardiology. Of note, the practice of interventional cardiology took place amidst successive waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, which continues to be a major burden for all healthcare professionals around the globe. In our yearly review, we shall revisit the developments in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), structural heart interventions, and adjunctive pharmacotherapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667341

ABSTRACT

Approximately 5 million percutaneous coronary interventions are performed worldwide annually. Therefore, stent-related complications pose a serious public health concern. Stent thrombosis, although rare, is usually catastrophic, often associated with extensive myocardial infarction or death. Because little progress has been made in outcomes following stent thrombosis, ongoing research is focusing on further understanding the predictors as well as frequency and timing in various patient subgroups. Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), a viral illness caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), activates inflammatory mechanisms that potentially create a prothrombotic environment and increases the risk of local micro thromboembolism and all types of stent thrombosis. In-stent thrombosis occurrence increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, however, there is still lack of comprehensive studies describing this population. This review and worldwide analysis of coronary stent thrombosis cases related to COVID-19 summarizes all available data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Thrombosis/epidemiology , Coronary Thrombosis/virology , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Stents/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Coronary Thrombosis/classification , Coronary Vessels/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
10.
Indian Heart J ; 74(2): 131-134, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664977

ABSTRACT

Thrombo-embolic complications after Corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19) vaccination have been previously reported. We aimed to study the coronary thrombo-embolic complications (CTE) after COVID-19 vaccination in a single centre during the initial 3 months of vaccination drive in India. All patients admitted to our hospital between 1st March 2021 and 31st May 2021 with Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Of the 89 patients [Age 55 (47-64)y, 13f] with ACS and angiographic evidence of coronary thrombus, 37 (42%) had prior vaccination history. The timing from last vaccination dose to index event was <1, 1-2, 2-4 and >4 weeks in 9(24%), 4(11%), 15(41%) and 9 (24%) respectively. ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/AZD1222 (Covishield) was the most used vaccine- 28 (76%), while 9 (24%) had BBV152 (Covaxin). Baseline characteristics were similar in both vaccinated (VG) and non-vaccinated group (NVG), except for symptom to door time [8.5 (5.75-14) vs 14.5 (7.25-24) hrs, p = 0.003]. Thrombocytopenia was not noted in any of the VG patients, while 2 (3.8%) of NVG patient had thrombocytopenia (p = 0.51). The pre- Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow was significantly lower [1 (0-3) vs2 (1-3), p = 0.03) and thrombus grade were significantly higher [4 (2.5-5) vs 2 (1-3), p = 0.0005] in VG. The in-hospital (2.7% vs 1.9%, p = 1.0) and 30-day mortality were also similar (5.4% vs 5.8%, p = 1.0). This is the first report of CTE after COVID-19 vaccination during the first 3 months of vaccination drive in India. We need further reports to identify the incidence of this rare but serious adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Embolism , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Embolism/etiology , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects
11.
Am Heart J ; 247: 33-41, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1652480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Activation of inflammatory pathways during acute myocardial infarction contributes to infarct size and left ventricular (LV) remodeling. The present prospective randomized clinical trial was designed to test the efficacy and safety of broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy with a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor to reduce infarct size. DESIGN: Controlled-Level EVERolimus in Acute Coronary Syndrome (CLEVER-ACS, clinicaltrials.gov NCT01529554) is a phase II randomized, double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled trial on the effects of a 5-day course of oral everolimus on infarct size, LV remodeling, and inflammation in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Within 5 days of successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI), patients are randomly assigned to everolimus (first 3 days: 7.5 mg every day; days 4 and 5: 5.0 mg every day) or placebo, respectively. The primary efficacy outcome is the change from baseline (defined as 12 hours to 5 days after pPCI) to 30-day follow-up in myocardial infarct size as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Secondary endpoints comprise corresponding changes in cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers as well as microvascular obstruction and LV volumes assessed by CMRI. Clinical events, laboratory parameters, and blood cell counts are reported as safety endpoints at 30 days. CONCLUSION: The CLEVER-ACS trial tests the hypothesis whether mTOR inhibition using everolimus at the time of an acute STEMI affects LV infarct size following successful pPCI.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , Anterior Wall Myocardial Infarction , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Acute Coronary Syndrome/drug therapy , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Double-Blind Method , Everolimus/therapeutic use , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Prospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Remodeling
12.
Kardiologiia ; 61(12): 4-15, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in Russian, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1644025

ABSTRACT

Aim    To analyze the number of cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) [ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (nSTEACS)] and results of myocardial revascularization for ACS as a part of the monitoring performed by the Ministry of Health Care of Russia*. This analysis allows, on one hand, providing control of morbidity and mortality of patients with socially significant pathologies and, on the other hand, monitoring the effectivity of treatments to identify and correct their shortcomings. Time-related changes in results of myocardial revascularization performed for ACS patients in the Russian Federation in 2020 were analyzed and compared with the values of 2016-2019 based on data of the Russian Ministry of Health Care monitoring.Material and methods    Yearly absolute, relative, and calculated indices of revascularization for ACS were analyzed and compared based on data of the Russian Ministry of Health Care monitoring in 2016-2020.Results    In the Russian Federation in 2020, the lowest number of hospitalizations for ACS (403, 931) was recorded with an unprecedented ratio of 1 / 1.8 for STEMI/nSTEACS, respectively. In Russia in 2020, the proportion of primary percutaneous coronary interventions (pPCI) for STEMI continued growing; it reached 44% and peaked to the maximum for 2016-2020. At the same time, the thrombolytic therapy (TLT) remained essential in the structure of reperfusion strategies during those years (24.0-27.3 % of all STEMI cases). Total death rate of admitted patients with STEMI in Russia was stable at the level of 13.1-14.6 %. In 2020, there were no significant differences in quality indexes of the treatment for STEMI from the previous period (2016-2019). A yearly relative increase in the number of PCIs for STEACS (from 16 % in 2016 to 30 % in 2020 and from 30% to 46% for high-risk nSTEACS) was observed. In 2020, a significant increase in death rate was observed for nSTEACS as a whole (to 4.1 %) and for individual subgroups (high-risk nSTEACS, to 4.5 %; after PCI for nSTEACS, to 1.8 %; and after PCI for high-risk nSTEACS, to 2.8 %) whereas mean death rate values in these subgroups in 2016-2019 were 2.75 %, 3.45 %, 1.5 %, and 2.3 %, respectively.Conclusion    The analysis of revascularization indexes in ACS patients based on the Ministry of Health Care of Russia monitoring performed in 2016-2020 showed a number of positive trends, including an increase in the total number of revascularization procedures; a decrease in the time from the disease onset to the endovascular treatment; an increase in the availability of stenting for severe ACS; and general stabilization of the mortality. On the other hand, the Russian Federation is considerably behind European countries in several qualitative and quantitative parameters of health care in ACS, such as pPCI availability, symptom-to-balloon time, total mortality of all hospitalized STEMI patients, and revascularization for nSTEACS. Despite the gradual improvement of relative quantitative indexes of myocardial revascularization for ACS, negative changes in the absolute number of myocardial revascularizations for various forms of ACS and a notable increase in the death rate in nSTEACS were observed in 2020, including patients after PCI. There is no doubt that the negative results of myocardial revascularization in Russia in 2020 were due to the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic.* monitoring of measures to reduce the mortality from ischemic heart disease (letters of the Ministry of Health Care of the Russian Federation of 13.03.2015 # 17-6 /10 / 1-177 and of 24.07.2015 # 17-9 / 10 / 2-4128), which includes monthly collection of data on the Federal Research Institute for Health Organization and Informatics portal, the Automated System for Monitoring of Medical Statistics, at http://asmms.mednet.ru.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Acute Coronary Syndrome/surgery , Humans , Myocardial Revascularization , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Am J Cardiol ; 169: 18-23, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635346

ABSTRACT

Fewer ST-elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMIs) presentations and increased delays in care occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic in urban areas. Whether these associations occurred in a more rural population has not been previously reported. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on time-to-presentation for STEMI in rural locations. Patients presenting to a large STEMI network spanning 27 facilities and 13 predominantly rural counties between January 1, 2016 and April 30, 2020 were included. Presentation delays, defined as time from symptom onset to arrival at the first medical facility, classified as ≥12 and ≥24 hours from symptom onset were compared among patients in the pre-COVID-19 and the early COVID-19 eras. To account for patient-level differences, 2:1 propensity score matching was performed using binary logistic regression. Among 1,286 patients with STEMI, 1,245 patients presented in the pre-COVID-19 era and 41 presented during the early COVID-19 era. Presentation delays ≥12 hours (19.5% vs 4.0%) and ≥24 hours (14.6% and 0.2%) were more common in COVID-19 than pre-COVID-19 cohorts (p <0.001 for both), despite a low COVID-19 prevalence. Similar results were seen in propensity-matched comparisons (≥12 hours: 19.5% vs 2.4%, p = 0.002; ≥24 hours 14.6% vs 0.0%, p = 0.001). In a predominantly rural STEMI population, delays in seeking medical care after symptom onset were markedly more frequent during the COVID-19 era, despite low COVID-19 prevalence. Considering delays in reperfusion have multiple adverse downstream consequences, these findings may have important implications in rural communities during future pandemic resurgences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Prevalence , Rural Population , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
15.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 99(2): 391-396, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of COVID-19 on the diagnosis and management of nonculprit lesions remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the management and outcomes of patients with nonculprit lesions during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational analysis of consecutive primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) pathway activations across the heart attack center network in London, UK. Data from the study period in 2020 were compared with prepandemic data in 2019. The primary outcome was the rate of nonculprit lesion percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiovascular events. RESULTS: A total of 788 patients undergoing PPCI were identified, 209 (60%) in 2020 cohort and 263 (60%) in 2019 cohort had nonculprit lesions (p = .89). There was less functional assessment of the significance of nonculprit lesions in the 2020 cohort compared to 2019 cohort; in 8% 2020 cohort versus 15% 2019 cohort (p = .01). There was no difference in rates of PCI for nonculprit disease in the 2019 and 2020 cohorts (31% vs 30%, p = .11). Patients in 2020 cohort underwent nonculprit lesion PCI sooner than the 2019 cohort (p < .001). At 6 months there was higher rates of unplanned revascularization (4% vs. 2%, p = .05) and repeat myocardial infarction (4% vs. 1%, p = .02) in the 2019 cohort compared to 2020 cohort. CONCLUSION: Changes to clinical practice during the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with reduced rates of unplanned revascularization and myocardial infarction at 6-months follow-up, and despite the pandemic, there was no difference in mortality, suggesting that it is not only safe but maybe more efficacious.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , London/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Treatment Outcome
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(12)2021 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561838

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, several cases have reported extensive multivessel coronary thrombosis as a cardiovascular manifestation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. This case describes a patient who developed non-ST elevation myocardial infarction during hospitalization for acute hypoxic respiratory failure due to COVID-19. We review the immediate and delayed revascularisation strategies of culprit and non-culprit lesions in the setting of high intracoronary thrombus burden induced by SARS-CoV-2. Successful percutaneous intervention and stenting of a culprit lesion and resolution of an intracoronary thrombus using a delayed strategy of lesion passivation with adjuvant pharmacotherapy are demonstrated on index and follow-up angiography.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Thrombosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Thrombosis/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
17.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 78(25): 2550-2560, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regional heart attack services have improved clinical outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) by facilitating early reperfusion by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Early discharge after primary PCI is welcomed by patients and increases efficiency of health care. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of a novel early hospital discharge pathway for low-risk STEMI patients. METHODS: Between March 2020 and June 2021, 600 patients who were deemed at low risk for early major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) were selected for inclusion in the pathway and were successfully discharged in <48 hours. Patients were reviewed by a structured telephone follow-up at 48 hours after discharge by a cardiac rehabilitation nurse and underwent a virtual follow-up at 2, 6, and 8 weeks and at 3 months. RESULTS: The median length of hospital stay was 24.6 hours (interquartile range [IQR]: 22.7-30.0 hours) (prepathway median: 65.9 hours [IQR: 48.1-120.2 hours]). After discharge, all patients were contacted, with none lost to follow-up. During median follow-up of 271 days (IQR: 88-318 days), there were 2 deaths (0.33%), both caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (>30 days after discharge), with 0% cardiovascular mortality and MACE rates of 1.2%. This finding compared favorably with a historical group of 700 patients meeting pathway criteria who remained in the hospital for >48 hours (>48-hour control group) (mortality, 0.7%; MACE, 1.9%) both in unadjusted and propensity-matched analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Selected low-risk patients can be discharged safely following successful primary PCI by using a pathway that is supported by a structured, multidisciplinary virtual follow-up schedule.


Subject(s)
Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
19.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(242): 1048-1051, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547958

ABSTRACT

Silent myocardial infarction or unrecognized myocardial infarction has increased prevalence in elderly population with increased cardiovascular risk factors. However, its prevalence in COVID-19 patients is not well-known. A 77-year-old Caucasian male with COVID-19 pneumonia, presented with silent ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, diabetic ketoacidosis and multiorgan failure. He underwent cardiac catheterization and drug eluting stent placement in the ostial right coronary artery with safety protocol. He was discharged to extended-care-facility in stable condition. This is a first case report of silent ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient presenting with COVID-19. In patients with COVID-19, acute myocardial infarction should be ruled out even when asymptomatic, especially in older patients. Prompt intervention using safety protocol is life-saving.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Eluting Stents , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , Humans , Male , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
20.
Intern Med ; 60(23): 3693-3700, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547078

ABSTRACT

Objective The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a significant impact on global healthcare systems. Some studies have reported the negative impact of COVID-19 on ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients; however, the impact in Japan remains unclear. This study investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on STEMI patients admitted to an academic tertiary-care center in Tokyo, Japan. Methods In this retrospective, observational, cohort study, we included 398 consecutive patients who were admitted to our institute from January 1, 2018, to March 10, 2021, and compared the incidence of hospitalization, clinical characteristics, time course, management, and outcomes before and after March 11, 2020, the date when the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. Results There was a 10.7% reduction in hospitalization of STEMI patients during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with that in the previous year (117 vs. 131 cases). During the COVID-19 pandemic, the incidence of late presentation was significantly higher (26.5% vs. 12.1%, p<0.001), and the onset-to-door [241 (IQR: 70-926) vs. 128 (IQR: 66-493) minutes, p=0.028] and door-to-balloon [72 (IQR: 61-128) vs. 60 (IQR: 43-90) min, p<0.001] times were significantly longer than in the previous year. Furthermore, the in-hospital mortality was higher, but the difference was not significant (9.4% vs. 5.0%, p=0.098). Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic significantly impacted STEMI patients in Tokyo and resulted in a slight decrease in hospitalization, a significant increase in late presentation and treatment delays, and a slight but nonsignificant increase in mortality. In the COVID-19 era, the acute management system for STEMI in Japan must be reviewed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Tokyo/epidemiology
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