Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 45
Filter
1.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(4): 427-434, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND HYPOTHESIS: Two cohorts face high mortality after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI): females and patients with in-hospital STEMI. The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in ischemic times and outcomes of in-hospital STEMI patients. METHODS: Consecutive STEMI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were prospectively recruited from 30 hospitals into the Victorian Cardiac Outcomes Registry (2013-2018). Sex discrepancies within in-hospital STEMIs were compared with out-of-hospital STEMIs. The primary endpoint was 12-month all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints included symptom-to-device (STD) time and 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). To investigate the relationship between sex and 12-month mortality for in-hospital versus out-of-hospital STEMIs, an interaction analysis was included in the multivariable models. RESULTS: A total of 7493 STEMI patients underwent PCI of which 494 (6.6%) occurred in-hospital. In-hospital versus out-of-hospital STEMIs comprised 31.9% and 19.9% females, respectively. Female in-hospital STEMIs were older (69.5 vs. 65.9 years, p = .003) with longer adjusted geometric mean STD times (104.6 vs. 94.3 min, p < .001) than men. Female versus male in-hospital STEMIs had no difference in 12-month mortality (27.1% vs. 20.3%, p = .92) and MACE (22.8% vs. 19.3%, p = .87). Female sex was not independently associated with 12-month mortality for in-hospital STEMIs which was consistent across the STEMI cohort (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 0.94-1.70, p = .13). CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital STEMIs are more frequent in females relative to out-of-hospital STEMIs. Despite already being under medical care, females with in-hospital STEMIs experienced a 10-min mean excess in STD time compared with males, after adjustment for confounders. Adjusted 12-month mortality and MACE were similar to males.


Subject(s)
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Sex Characteristics , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/etiology , Treatment Outcome
2.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 22(12 Suppl 2): 4-15, 2021 12.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765600

ABSTRACT

Minimization of hospital lengths of stay has always been a key goal for healthcare systems. More so during the current COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, we have faced a reduction in no-COVID-19 admissions with the generation of huge backlogs. Low-risk patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be candidate for short-term hospitalization, with consequent reduction of waiting lists. Several single-center and multicenter observational studies, multiple randomized trials and some meta-analyses have addressed this topic.In this position paper, we present a proposal for short hospitalization for elective PCI procedures in selected patients who present complications only exceptionally and exclusively immediately after the procedure, if the inclusion and exclusion criteria are met. Each Center can choose between admission in day surgery or one day surgery, extending hospital length of stay only for patients who present complications or who are candidate for urgent surgery. Short-term hospitalization considerably reduces costs even if, with the current model, it generally results in a parallel reduction in reimbursement. Hence, we present an actual model, already tested successfully in an Italian hospital, that warrants sustainability. This approach can then be tailored to single Centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Pandemics/prevention & control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects
3.
J Card Surg ; 37(6): 1759-1763, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752614

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is one of the mechanical complications of acute myocardial infarction (MI), whose incidence has been decreasing throughout the years because of the emergence of different reperfusion therapy strategies. METHODS: We present a series of seven patients who underwent surgery for post-MI VSD repair in our institution in the period between March 2020 and June 2021. DISCUSSION: During the recent SARS-COV2 pandemic, time to hospital admission increased due to patients being overcautious out of fear of exposing themselves to COVID-19. The increased time to hospital admission, with associated late reperfusion therapy and delayed PCI, is closely related to an augmented incidence of post-myocardial infarction mechanical complications such as ventricular septal defects. For this reason, we witnessed an increase in the incidence of post-MI VSD. CONCLUSION: Fear of exposure to SARS-COV2 in the medical environment was a major source of concern for all our patients. The target of hospital policy should be to reassure patients of freedom from COVID in the emergency department and cardiac wards in order to prevent such dreadful complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular/complications , Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular/surgery , Humans , Incidence , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e052000, 2022 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736067

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) that occur while already in hospital ('in-hospital STEMI') face high mortality. However, data about this patient population are scarce. We sought to investigate differences in reperfusion and outcomes of in-hospital versus out-of-hospital STEMI. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive patients with STEMI all treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) across 30 centres were prospectively recruited into the Victorian Cardiac Outcomes Registry (2013-2018). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Patients with in-hospital STEMI were compared with patients with out-of-hospital STEMI with a primary endpoint of 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Secondary endpoints included ischaemic times, all-cause mortality and major bleeding. RESULTS: Of 7493 patients with PCI-treated STEMI, 494 (6.6%) occurred in-hospital. Patients with in-hospital STEMI were older (67.1 vs 62.4 years, p<0.001), more often women (32% vs 19.9%, p<0.001), with more comorbidities. Patients with in-hospital STEMI had higher 30-day MACE (20.4% vs 9.8%, p<0.001), mortality (12.1% vs 6.9%, p<0.001) and major bleeding (4.9% vs 2.3%, p<0.001), than patients with out-of-hospital STEMI. According to guideline criteria, patients with in-hospital STEMI achieved symptom-to-device times of ≤70 min and ≤90 min in 29% and 47%, respectively. Patients with out-of-hospital STEMI achieved door-to-device times of ≤90 min in 71%. Occurrence of STEMI while in hospital independently predicted higher MACE (adjusted OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.36, p<0.001) and 12-month mortality (adjusted OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.07, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with in-hospital STEMI experience delays to reperfusion with significantly higher MACE and mortality, compared with patients with out-of-hospital STEMI, after adjustment for confounders. Focused strategies are needed to improve recognition and outcomes in this high-risk and understudied population.


Subject(s)
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Registries , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
5.
Anatol J Cardiol ; 26(2): 118-126, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Global studies report a significant decline in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) related hospitalization rates during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak. However, there have been several divergent reports on hospital outcomes. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of the COVID 19 outbreak on hospitalizations because of STEMI and in-hospital outcomes in Albania. METHODS: This was a retrograde study, collecting data for hospitalizations because of STEMI from March 9, (first COVID 19 case in our country) to April 30, 2020, (period of total lockdown) compared with the same period in 2019 at our center. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was used to compare admissions because of STEMI and procedures and the risk ratio (RR) to compare mortality and other complication rates. RESULTS: Admissions for STEMI declined during the COVID-19 period from a total of 217 in 2019 to 156 in 2020 (-28.1%) representing IRR 0.719 (p=0.033). PCIs also reduced from 168 procedures in 2019 to 113 in 2020 (-33%), representing an IRR of 0.67, p=0.021. The time from symptom onset to arrival at our intensive care unit was significantly higher in 2020 compared to 2019 (925.6±1097 vs. 438.7±385 minutes, p<0.001). The STEMI death rate during the pandemic compared to the control period was significantly increased to 14.1% vs. 7.8% (RR=1.91 p=0.037, but with no significant increase in primary PCI-STEMI death rate (8.9% vs. 4.8% RR=1.85 p=0.217). Cardiogenic shock also increased during the pandemic to 21.2% from 12.4% in 2019 (RR=1.70 p=0.025). CONCLUSION: Hospitalizations and revascularization procedures for STEMI significantly reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic. We identified a substantial increase in the STEMI mortality rate and cardiogenic shock during the pandemic outbreak. Delayed timely reperfusion intervention might be responsible for the increased risk for complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Communicable Disease Control , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 99(2): 391-396, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of COVID-19 on the diagnosis and management of nonculprit lesions remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the management and outcomes of patients with nonculprit lesions during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational analysis of consecutive primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) pathway activations across the heart attack center network in London, UK. Data from the study period in 2020 were compared with prepandemic data in 2019. The primary outcome was the rate of nonculprit lesion percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiovascular events. RESULTS: A total of 788 patients undergoing PPCI were identified, 209 (60%) in 2020 cohort and 263 (60%) in 2019 cohort had nonculprit lesions (p = .89). There was less functional assessment of the significance of nonculprit lesions in the 2020 cohort compared to 2019 cohort; in 8% 2020 cohort versus 15% 2019 cohort (p = .01). There was no difference in rates of PCI for nonculprit disease in the 2019 and 2020 cohorts (31% vs 30%, p = .11). Patients in 2020 cohort underwent nonculprit lesion PCI sooner than the 2019 cohort (p < .001). At 6 months there was higher rates of unplanned revascularization (4% vs. 2%, p = .05) and repeat myocardial infarction (4% vs. 1%, p = .02) in the 2019 cohort compared to 2020 cohort. CONCLUSION: Changes to clinical practice during the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with reduced rates of unplanned revascularization and myocardial infarction at 6-months follow-up, and despite the pandemic, there was no difference in mortality, suggesting that it is not only safe but maybe more efficacious.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , London/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Treatment Outcome
7.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(242): 1048-1051, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547958

ABSTRACT

Silent myocardial infarction or unrecognized myocardial infarction has increased prevalence in elderly population with increased cardiovascular risk factors. However, its prevalence in COVID-19 patients is not well-known. A 77-year-old Caucasian male with COVID-19 pneumonia, presented with silent ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, diabetic ketoacidosis and multiorgan failure. He underwent cardiac catheterization and drug eluting stent placement in the ostial right coronary artery with safety protocol. He was discharged to extended-care-facility in stable condition. This is a first case report of silent ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient presenting with COVID-19. In patients with COVID-19, acute myocardial infarction should be ruled out even when asymptomatic, especially in older patients. Prompt intervention using safety protocol is life-saving.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Eluting Stents , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , Humans , Male , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
8.
Tex Heart Inst J ; 48(4)2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527036

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, social distancing guidelines have negatively affected the care-seeking behavior of patients with chronic medical conditions, including those with cardiovascular disease. We report the case of a 60-year-old man with vague gastrointestinal symptoms who waited more than 1 week to seek treatment for fear of COVID-19 infection. On presentation at another hospital, he was found to have had an anterior myocardial infarction, and he underwent percutaneous coronary intervention to stent an occluded proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Subsequently, the patient experienced refractory cardiogenic shock and, during his transfer to our hospital, refractory ventricular tachycardia, which ultimately proved fatal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Fear , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery
9.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 99(3): 641-649, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513777

ABSTRACT

Plaque rupture leads to a cascade of events culminating in collagen disruption, tissue factor release, platelet activation and thrombus formation. Pro-inflammatory conditions, hyperglycemia and smoking predispose to high thrombus burden (HTB) which is an independent predictor of slow or no-reflow. In patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPI) reduce thrombus burden and improve myocardial perfusion. These agents are typically administered systemically via the intravenous route or locally via an intracoronary (IC) route. However, as higher local concentrations of GPI are associated with enhanced platelet inhibition, intralesional (IL) GPI administration may be particularly effective in cases of HTB. Modest-sized randomized trials comparing IL and IC GPI delivery have reported conflicting outcomes. Some trials have demonstrated improved coronary flow and myocardial perfusion with reduced major adverse cardiac events with IL compared with IC GPI administration, whereas others have shown no significant benefits. Furthermore, although no direct comparison has been made between IL delivery using an aspiration catheter, microcatheter or a dedicated balloon-based "weeping" infusion-catheter, improved outcomes have been most consistent following GPI administration at the site of the lesion and thrombus with the dedicated infusion catheter. This review provides an update on the role and outcomes of IL GPI administration in patients with AMI and HTB. Based on the evidence we offer an algorithm demonstrating when to consider IL administration in patients with AMI undergoing intervention. We conclude with a perspective on the management of patients with STEMI and COVID-19 in whom a prothrombotic state often results in HTB.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Heart ; 108(6): 458-466, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495503

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The initial data of the International Study on Acute Coronary Syndromes - ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction COVID-19 showed in Europe a remarkable reduction in primary percutaneous coronary intervention procedures and higher in-hospital mortality during the initial phase of the pandemic as compared with the prepandemic period. The aim of the current study was to provide the final results of the registry, subsequently extended outside Europe with a larger inclusion period (up to June 2020) and longer follow-up (up to 30 days). METHODS: This is a retrospective multicentre registry in 109 high-volume primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) centres from Europe, Latin America, South-East Asia and North Africa, enrolling 16 674 patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing PPPCI in March/June 2019 and 2020. The main study outcomes were the incidence of PPCI, delayed treatment (ischaemia time >12 hours and door-to-balloon >30 min), in-hospital and 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In 2020, during the pandemic, there was a significant reduction in PPCI as compared with 2019 (incidence rate ratio 0.843, 95% CI 0.825 to 0.861, p<0.0001). This reduction was significantly associated with age, being higher in older adults (>75 years) (p=0.015), and was not related to the peak of cases or deaths due to COVID-19. The heterogeneity among centres was high (p<0.001). Furthermore, the pandemic was associated with a significant increase in door-to-balloon time (40 (25-70) min vs 40 (25-64) min, p=0.01) and total ischaemia time (225 (135-410) min vs 196 (120-355) min, p<0.001), which may have contributed to the higher in-hospital (6.5% vs 5.3%, p<0.001) and 30-day (8% vs 6.5%, p=0.001) mortality observed during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous revascularisation for STEMI was significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, with a 16% reduction in PPCI procedures, especially among older patients (about 20%), and longer delays to treatment, which may have contributed to the increased in-hospital and 30-day mortality during the pandemic. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04412655.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
11.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 300, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430407

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury is a common complication of percutaneous coronary intervention and has been associated with an increased risk of death and progressive chronic kidney disease. However, whether the timing of acute kidney injury after urgent percutaneous coronary intervention could be used to improve patient risk stratification is not known. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in adults surviving an urgent percutaneous coronary intervention between 2008 and 2013 within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated healthcare delivery system, to evaluate the impact of acute kidney injury during hospitalization at 12 (±6), 24 (±6) and 48 (±6) hours after urgent percutaneous coronary intervention and subsequent risks of adverse outcomes within the first year after discharge. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for a high-dimensional propensity score for developing acute kidney injury after percutaneous coronary intervention to examine the associations between acute kidney injury timing and all-cause death and worsening chronic kidney disease. RESULTS: Among 7250 eligible adults undergoing urgent percutaneous coronary intervention, 306 (4.2%) had acute kidney injury at one or more of the examined time periods after percutaneous coronary intervention. After adjustment, acute kidney injury at 12 (±6) hours was independently associated with higher risks of death (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 3.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.19-5.75) and worsening kidney function (aHR 2.40, 95% CI:1.24-4.63). Similar results were observed for acute kidney injury at 24 (±6) hours and death (aHR 3.90, 95% CI:2.29-6.66) and worsening chronic kidney disease (aHR 4.77, 95% CI:2.46-9.23). Acute kidney injury at 48 (±6) hours was associated with excess mortality (aHR 1.97, 95% CI:1.19-3.26) but was not significantly associated with worsening kidney function (aHR 0.91, 95% CI:0.42-1.98). CONCLUSIONS: Timing of acute kidney injury after urgent percutaneous coronary intervention may be differentially associated with subsequent risk of worsening kidney function but not death.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Aged , Cause of Death , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Time Factors
12.
J Cardiol ; 79(4): 455-459, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364267

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has a profound impact on the health care system worldwide. In the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals are required to halt elective surgeries and procedures for preventing nosocomial infections and saving medical resources. In these situations, emergency procedures are required for life-threatening cardiovascular diseases such as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock. To prevent the spread of COVID-19, a social distance is essentially required. In ordinary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), operators manipulate the devices standing at the patient's tableside during the whole procedure, which may involve a certain risk of exposure to patients with COVID-19. A robotic-assisted PCI (R-PCI) allows operators to manipulate devices remotely, sitting at a cockpit located several meters away from the patient, and in addition, the assistant can be at the foot of the bed, much further from the access site. R-PCI can help to minimize the radiation exposure and the amount of person-to-person contact, and consequently may reduce the risk for the exposure to the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Artery Disease , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
14.
Open Heart ; 8(2)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341341

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen the introduction of important public health measures to minimise the spread of the virus. We aim to identify the impact government restrictions and hospital-based infection control procedures on ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients meeting ST elevation criteria and undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention from 27 March 2020, the day initial national lockdown measures were announced in Ireland, were included in the study. Patients presenting after the lockdown period, from 18 May to 31 June 2020, were also examined. Time from symptom onset to first medical contact (FMC), transfer time and time of wire cross was noted. Additionally, patient characteristics, left ventricular ejection fraction, mortality and biochemical parameters were documented. Outcomes and characteristics were compared against a control group of patients meeting ST elevation criteria during the month of January. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients presented with STEMI during the lockdown period. A significant increase in total ischaemic time (TIT) was noted versus controls (8.81 hours (±16.4) vs 2.99 hours (±1.39), p=0.03), with increases driven largely by delays in seeking FMC (7.13 hours (±16.4) vs 1.98 hours (±1.46), p=0.049). TIT remained significantly elevated during the postlockdown period (6.1 hours (±5.3), p=0.05), however, an improvement in patient delays was seen versus the control group (3.99 hours (±4.5), p=0.06). There was no difference seen in transfer times and door to wire cross time during lockdown, however, a significant increase in transfer times was seen postlockdown versus controls (1.81 hours (±1.0) vs 1.1 hours (±0.87), p=0.004). CONCLUSION: A significant increase in TIT was seen during the lockdown period driven mainly by patient factors highlighting the significance of public health messages on public perception. Additionally, a significant delay in transfer times to our centre was seen postlockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Aged , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Ireland , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Transfer/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
15.
Atherosclerosis ; 332: 48-54, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: SARS-Cov-2 predisposes patients to thrombotic complications, due to excessive inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, and coagulation/fibrinolysis disturbances. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of SARS-CoV-2 positivity among STEMI patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). METHODS: We selected SARS-CoV-2 positive patients included in the ISACS-STEMI COVID-19, a retrospective multicenter European registry including 6609 STEMI patients treated with PPCI from March 1st until April 30th, in 2019 and 2020. As a reference group, we randomly sampled 5 SARS-Cov-2 negative patients per each SARS-CoV-2 positive patient, individually matched for age, sex, and hospital/geographic area. Study endpoints were in-hospital mortality, definite stent thrombosis, heart failure. RESULTS: Our population is represented by 62 positive SARS-CoV-2 positive patients who were compared with a matched population of 310 STEMI patients. No significant difference was observed in baseline characteristics or the modality of access to the PCI center. In the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients, the culprit lesion was more often located in the RCA (p < 0.001). Despite similar pre and postprocedural TIMI flow, we observed a trend in higher use of GP IIb-IIIa inhibitors and a significantly higher use of thrombectomy in the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients. SARS-CoV-2 positivity was associated with a remarkably higher in hospital mortality (29% vs 5.5%, p < 0.001), definite in-stent thrombosis (8.1% vs 1.6%, p = 0.004) and heart failure (22.6% vs 10.6%, p = 0.001) that was confirmed after adjustment for confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that among STEMI patients, SARS-CoV-2 positivity is associated with larger thrombus burden, a remarkably higher mortality but also higher rates of in-stent thrombosis and heart failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Registries , Reperfusion , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
16.
JAMA ; 325(19): 1955-1964, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258005

ABSTRACT

Importance: It is uncertain whether coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is associated with cognitive decline in older adults compared with a nonsurgical method of coronary revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]). Objective: To compare the change in the rate of memory decline after CABG vs PCI. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of community-dwelling participants in the Health and Retirement Study, who underwent CABG or PCI between 1998 and 2015 at age 65 years or older. Data were modeled for up to 5 years preceding and 10 years following revascularization or until death, drop out, or the 2016-2017 interview wave. The date of final follow-up was November 2017. Exposures: CABG (including on and off pump) or PCI, ascertained from Medicare fee-for-service billing records. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was a summary measure of cognitive test scores and proxy cognition reports that were performed biennially in the Health and Retirement Study, referred to as memory score, normalized as a z score (ie, mean of 0, SD of 1 in a reference population of adults aged ≥72 years). Memory score was analyzed using multivariable linear mixed-effects models, with a prespecified subgroup analysis of on-pump and off-pump CABG. The minimum clinically important difference was a change of 1 SD of the population-level rate of memory decline (0.048 memory units/y). Results: Of 1680 participants (mean age at procedure, 75 years; 41% female), 665 underwent CABG (168 off pump) and 1015 underwent PCI. In the PCI group, the mean rate of memory decline was 0.064 memory units/y (95% CI, 0.052 to 0.078) before the procedure and 0.060 memory units/y (95% CI, 0.048 to 0.071) after the procedure (within-group change, 0.004 memory units/y [95% CI, -0.010 to 0.018]). In the CABG group, the mean rate of memory decline was 0.049 memory units/y (95% CI, 0.033 to 0.065) before the procedure and 0.059 memory units/y (95% CI, 0.047 to 0.072) after the procedure (within-group change, -0.011 memory units/y [95% CI, -0.029 to 0.008]). The between-group difference-in-differences estimate for memory decline for PCI vs CABG was 0.015 memory units/y (95% CI, -0.008 to 0.038; P = .21). There was statistically significant increase in the rate of memory decline after off-pump CABG compared with after PCI (difference-in-differences: mean increase in the rate of decline of 0.046 memory units/y [95% CI, 0.008 to 0.084] after off-pump CABG), but not after on-pump CABG compared with PCI (difference-in-differences: mean slowing of decline of 0.003 memory units/y [95% CI, -0.024 to 0.031] after on-pump CABG). Conclusions and Relevance: Among older adults undergoing coronary revascularization with CABG or PCI, the type of revascularization procedure was not significantly associated with differences in the change of rate of memory decline.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Bypass/adverse effects , Memory Disorders/etiology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Postoperative Cognitive Complications/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Neuropsychological Tests , Retrospective Studies
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9959, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225515

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic impacting nearly 170 countries/regions and millions of patients worldwide. Patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) still need to be treated at percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) centers with relevant safety measures. This retrospective study was conducted to assess the therapeutic outcomes of PCI performed under the safety measures and normal conditions. AMI patients undergoing PCI between January 24 to April 30, 2020 were performed under safety measures for COVID-19. Patients received pulmonary computed tomography (CT) and underwent PCI in negative pressure ICU. Cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) staff and physicians worked with level III personal protection. Demographic and clinical data, such as door-to-balloon (DTB) time, operation time, complications for patients in this period (COVID-19 group) and the same period in 2019 (2019 group) were retrieved and analyzed. COVID-19 and 2019 groups had 37 and 96 patients, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, gender, BMI and comorbidity between the two groups. DTB time and operation time were similar between the two groups (60.0 ± 12.39 vs 58.83 ± 12.85 min, p = 0.636; 61.46 ± 9.91 vs 62.55 ± 10.72 min, p = 0.592). Hospital stay time in COVID-19 group was significantly shorter (6.78 ± 2.14 vs 8.85 ± 2.64 days, p < 0.001). The incidences of malignant arrhythmia and Takotsubo Syndrome in COVID-19 group were higher than 2019 group significantly (16.22% vs 5.21%, p = 0.039; 10.81% vs 1.04% p = 0.008). During hospitalization and 3-month follow-up, the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality in the two groups were statistically similar (35.13% vs 14.58%, p = 0.094; 16.22% vs 8.33%, p = 0.184). The risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) was associated with cardiogenic shock (OR, 11.53; 95% CI, 2.888-46.036; p = 0.001), malignant arrhythmias (OR, 7.176; 95% CI, 1.893-27.203; p = 0.004) and advanced age (≥ 75 years) (OR, 6.718; 95% CI, 1.738-25.964; p = 0.006). Cardiogenic shock (OR, 17.663; 95% CI, 5.5-56.762; p < 0.001) and malignant arrhythmias (OR, 4.659; 95% CI, 1.481-14.653; p = 0.008) were also associated with death of 3 months. Our analysis showed that safety measures undertaken in this hospital, including screening of COVID-19 infection and use of personal protection equipment for conducting PCI did not compromise the surgical outcome as compared with PCI under normal condition, although there were slight increases in incidence of malignant arrhythmia and Takotsubo Syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Treatment Outcome , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Shock, Cardiogenic/epidemiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/epidemiology , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy/etiology
19.
EuroIntervention ; 16(17): 1426-1433, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194745

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess clinical and prognosis differences in patients with COVID-19 and STEMI. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using a nationwide registry of consecutive patients managed within 42 specific STEMI care networks, we compared patient and procedure characteristics and in-hospital outcomes in two different cohorts, according to whether or not they had COVID-19. Among 1,010 consecutive STEMI patients, 91 were identified as having COVID-19 (9.0%). With the exception of smoking status (more frequent in non-COVID-19 patients) and previous coronary artery disease (more frequent in COVID-19 patients), clinical characteristics were similar between the groups, but COVID-19 patients had more heart failure on arrival (31.9% vs 18.4%, p=0.002). Mechanical thrombectomy (44% vs 33.5%, p=0.046) and GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor administration (20.9% vs 11.2%, p=0.007) were more frequent in COVID-19 patients, who had an increased in-hospital mortality (23.1% vs 5.7%, p<0.0001), that remained consistent after adjustment for age, sex, Killip class and ischaemic time (OR 4.85, 95% CI: 2.04-11.51; p<0.001). COVID-19 patients had an increase of stent thrombosis (3.3% vs 0.8%, p=0.020) and cardiogenic shock development after PCI (9.9% vs 3.8%, p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed a significant increase in in-hospital mortality, stent thrombosis and cardiogenic shock development after PCI in patients with STEMI and COVID-19 in comparison with contemporaneous non-COVID-19 STEMI patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
20.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(1): 247-256, 2021 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168426

ABSTRACT

ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a common cardiovascular emergency for which timely reperfusion therapies are needed to minimize myocardial necrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and reorganization of chest pain centers (CPC) on the practice of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) and prognosis of STEMI patients. This single-center retrospective survey included all patients with STEMI admitted to our CPC from January 22, 2020 to April 30, 2020 (during COVID-19 pandemic in Wuhan), compared with those admitted during the analogous period in 2019, in respect of important time points of PPCI and clinical outcomes of STEMI patients. In the present article, we observed a descending trend in STEMI hospitalization and a longer time from symptom onset to first medical contact during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to the control period (4.35 h versus 2.58 h). With a median delay of 17 minutes in the door to balloon time (D2B), the proportion of in-hospital cardiogenic shock was significantly higher in the COVID-19 era group (47.6% versus 19.5%), and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) tend to increase in the 6-month follow-up period (14.3% versus 2.4%). Although the reorganization of CPC may prolong the D2B time, immediate revascularization of the infarct-related artery could be offered to most patients within 90 minutes upon arrival. PPCI remained the preferred treatment for patients with STEMI during COVID-19 pandemic in the context of timely implementation and appropriate protective measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , China/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL