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1.
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med ; 35(15): 2936-2941, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1900911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This is the first comprehensive review to focus on currently available evidence regarding maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality cases associated with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, up to July 2020. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and Web of Science databases to identify any reported cases of maternal, fetal or neonatal mortality associated with COVID-19 infection. The references of relevant studies were also hand-searched. RESULTS: Of 2815 studies screened, 10 studies reporting 37 maternal and 12 perinatal mortality cases (7 fetal demise and 5 neonatal death) were finally eligible for inclusion to this review. All maternal deaths were seen in women with previous co-morbidities, of which the most common were obesity, diabetes, asthma and advanced maternal age. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and severity of pneumonia were considered as the leading causes of all maternal mortalities, except for one case who died of thromboembolism during postpartum period. Fetal and neonatal mortalities were suggested to be a result of the severity of maternal infection or the prematurity, respectively. Interestingly, there was no evidence of vertical transmission or positive COVID-19 test result among expired neonates. CONCLUSION: Current available evidence suggested that maternal mortality mostly happened among women with previous co-morbidities and neonatal mortality seems to be a result of prematurity rather than infection. However, further reports are needed so that the magnitude of the maternal and perinatal mortality could be determined more precisely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Female , Humans , Infant Mortality , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Maternal Mortality , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 146(6): 660-676, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876076

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: Perinatal death is an increasingly important problem as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues, but the mechanism of death has been unclear. OBJECTIVE.­: To evaluate the role of the placenta in causing stillbirth and neonatal death following maternal infection with COVID-19 and confirmed placental positivity for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). DESIGN.­: Case-based retrospective clinicopathologic analysis by a multinational group of 44 perinatal specialists from 12 countries of placental and autopsy pathology findings from 64 stillborns and 4 neonatal deaths having placentas testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 following delivery to mothers with COVID-19. RESULTS.­: Of the 3 findings constituting SARS-CoV-2 placentitis, all 68 placentas had increased fibrin deposition and villous trophoblast necrosis and 66 had chronic histiocytic intervillositis. Sixty-three placentas had massive perivillous fibrin deposition. Severe destructive placental disease from SARS-CoV-2 placentitis averaged 77.7% tissue involvement. Other findings included multiple intervillous thrombi (37%; 25 of 68) and chronic villitis (32%; 22 of 68). The majority (19; 63%) of the 30 autopsies revealed no significant fetal abnormalities except for intrauterine hypoxia and asphyxia. Among all 68 cases, SARS-CoV-2 was detected from a body specimen in 16 of 28 cases tested, most frequently from nasopharyngeal swabs. Four autopsied stillborns had SARS-CoV-2 identified in internal organs. CONCLUSIONS.­: The pathology abnormalities composing SARS-CoV-2 placentitis cause widespread and severe placental destruction resulting in placental malperfusion and insufficiency. In these cases, intrauterine and perinatal death likely results directly from placental insufficiency and fetal hypoxic-ischemic injury. There was no evidence that SARS-CoV-2 involvement of the fetus had a role in causing these deaths.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Placenta , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/complications , Female , Fibrin , Humans , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Perinatal Death/etiology , Placenta/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stillbirth
4.
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med ; 35(25): 9742-9758, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740647

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This meta-analysis aimed at comparing obstetric and perinatal outcomes in laboratory-tested pregnant women for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection before delivering. METHOD: We performed a comprehensive systematic review of electronic databases for studies reporting pregnant women with and without SARS-CoV-2 infection, as determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) before delivery, during the pandemic period published up to June 25, 2021. Results are reported as mean difference (MD) or odds ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Seventeen observational studies with low to moderate risk of bias, reported on 2,769 pregnant women with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test and 13,807 with a negative test. Pregnant women with a positive PCR test delivered at an earlier gestational age (MD -0.19; 95% CI -0.36 to -0.02 weeks), smoked less (OR 0.75; 95% CI 0.61-0.94) and were associated with higher odds for preeclampsia (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.09-1.54), NICU admissions (OR 2.37; 95% CI 1.18-4.76), stillbirths (OR 2.70; 95% CI, 1.38-5.29), and perinatal mortality (OR 3.23; 95% CI 1.23-8.52). There were no significant differences between positive and negative tested women in terms of nulliparity, multiple pregnancies, gestational diabetes, route of delivery, labor induction, preterm birth, infant birth weight, 5 min Apgar scores < 7, small-for-gestational-age infants and fetal malformations. Eleven studies included neonatal PCR SARS-CoV-2 testing which was performed on 129 infants, of which 20 were positive. CONCLUSION: Positive SARS-CoV-2 tested pregnant women had higher odds for preeclampsia/hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, NICU admissions, stillbirths and perinatal mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Pre-Eclampsia , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stillbirth/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology
5.
J Perinat Med ; 50(6): 822-831, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708424

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Perinatal bereavement care is a complex area of practice. The COVID-19 pandemic led to reconfiguration of maternity and perinatal bereavement care services. This study explores Australian health care providers' perspectives of the impact of COVID-19 on the provision of respectful and supportive care following stillbirth or neonatal death. METHODS: Members of a perinatal bereavement care network were consulted at the commencement of the pandemic in Australia using an online feedback form. Respondents provided ratings and free-text comments on the impact of COVID-19 on implementation of 49 recommendations contained in the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand/Stillbirth Centre of Research Clinical Practice Guideline for Respectful and Supportive Perinatal Bereavement Care. RESULTS: Responses were received from 35 health care providers who provided perinatal bereavement care in clinical settings or through support organisations in Australia. Major impacts of COVID-19 were reported for 8 of 49 guideline recommendations. Impacts included reduced: support for mothers due to visitor restrictions; availability of cultural and spiritual support and interpreters; involvement of support people in decision-making; options for memory-making and commemorative rituals; and staff training and supervision. Adaptations to minimise impacts included virtual consultations, online staff training, use of cold cots, and increased staff support for memory-making. CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers encounter substantial challenges as they strive to implement best practice perinatal bereavement care in pandemic conditions. Some practice adaptations developed during the COVID-19 pandemic could benefit parents; however, evaluation of their effectiveness and acceptability is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospice Care , Perinatal Death , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Parents , Perinatal Care , Perinatal Death/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Stillbirth/epidemiology
6.
Science ; 375(6578): 253, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638865

ABSTRACT

Vaccination helps prevent stillbirths, critical care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Perinatal Death , Pregnancy , Premature Birth , Stillbirth
7.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 840, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic poses an unprecedented risk to the global population. Maternity care in the UK was subject to many iterations of guidance on how best to reconfigure services to keep women, their families and babies, and healthcare professionals safe. Parents who experience a pregnancy loss or perinatal death require particular care and support. PUDDLES is an international collaboration investigating the experiences of recently bereaved parents who suffered a late miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal death during the global COVID-19 pandemic, in seven countries. In this study, we aim to present early findings from qualitative work undertaken with recently bereaved parents in the United Kingdom about how access to healthcare and support services was negotiated during the pandemic. METHODS: In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents (N = 24) who had suffered a late miscarriage (n = 5; all mothers), stillbirth (n = 16; 13 mothers, 1 father, 1 joint interview involving both parents), or neonatal death (n = 3; all mothers). Data were analysed using a template analysis with the aim of investigating bereaved parents' access to services, care, and networks of support, during the pandemic after their bereavement. RESULTS: All parents had experience of utilising reconfigured maternity and/or neonatal, and bereavement care services during the pandemic. The themes utilised in the template analysis were: 1) The Shock & Confusion Associated with Necessary Restrictions to Daily Life; 2) Fragmented Care and Far Away Families; 3) Keeping Safe by Staying Away; and 4) Impersonal Care and Support Through a Screen. Results suggest access to maternity, neonatal, and bereavement care services were all significantly reduced, and parents' experiences were notably affected by service reconfigurations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, whilst preliminary, are important to document now, to help inform care and service provision as the pandemic continues and to provide learning for ongoing and future health system shocks. We draw conclusions on how to enable development of safe and appropriate services during this pandemic and any future health crises, to best support parents who experience a pregnancy loss or whose babies die.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/psychology , Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Grief , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth/psychology , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pregnancy , Preliminary Data , Psychosocial Support Systems , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
Eur J Pediatr ; 181(3): 1175-1184, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516855

ABSTRACT

Using provisional or opportunistic data, three nationwide studies (The Netherlands, the USA and Denmark) have identified a reduction in preterm or extremely preterm births during periods of COVID-19 restrictions. However, none of the studies accounted for perinatal deaths. To determine whether the reduction in extremely preterm births, observed in Denmark during the COVID-19 lockdown, could be the result of an increase in perinatal deaths and to assess the impact of extended COVID-19 restrictions, we performed a nationwide Danish register-based prevalence proportion study. We examined all singleton pregnancies delivered in Denmark during the COVID-19 strict lockdown calendar periods (March 12-April 14, 2015-2020, N = 31,164 births) and the extended calendar periods of COVID-19 restrictions (February 27-September 30, 2015-2020, N = 214,862 births). The extremely preterm birth rate was reduced (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.86) during the strict lockdown period in 2020, while perinatal mortality was not significantly different. During the extended period of restrictions in 2020, the extremely preterm birth rate was marginally reduced, and a significant reduction in the stillbirth rate (OR 0.69, 0.50 to 0.95) was observed. No changes in early neonatal mortality rates were found.Conclusion: Stillbirth and extremely preterm birth rates were reduced in Denmark during the period of COVID-19 restrictions and lockdown, respectively, suggesting that aspects of these containment and control measures confer an element of protection. The present observational study does not allow for causal inference; however, the results support the design of studies to ascertain whether behavioural or social changes for pregnant women may improve pregnancy outcomes. What is Known: • The aetiologies of preterm birth and stillbirth are multifaceted and linked to a wide range of socio-demographic, medical, obstetric, foetal, psychosocial and environmental factors. • The COVID-19 lockdown saw a reduction in extremely preterm births in Denmark and other high-income countries. An urgent question is whether this reduction can be explained by increased perinatal mortality. What is New: • The reduction in extremely preterm births during the Danish COVID-19 lockdown was not a consequence of increased perinatal mortality, which remained unchanged during this period. • The stillbirth rate was reduced throughout the extended period of COVID-19 restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Premature Birth , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant Mortality , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stillbirth/epidemiology
9.
Placenta ; 112: 97-104, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333705

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Pregnant women with covid-19 are more likely to experience preterm birth. The virus seems to be associated with a wide range of placental lesions, none of them specific. METHOD: We collected cases of Covid-19 maternal infection during pregnancy associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, for which we received the placenta. We studied clinical data and described pathological findings of placenta and post-mortem examination of fetuses. We performed an immunohistochemical study and RT-PCR of SARS-Cov-2 on placenta samples. RESULTS: We report 5 cases of poor fetal outcome, 3 fetal deaths and 2 extreme premature neonates, one with growth restriction, without clinical and biological sign of SARS-Cov-2 infection. All placenta presented massive perivillous fibrin deposition and large intervillous thrombi associated with strong SARS-Cov-2 expression in trophoblast and SARS-CoV-2 PCR positivity in amniotic fluid or on placenta samples. Chronic histiocytic intervillositis was present in 4/5 cases. Placental ultrasound was abnormal and the sFLT1-PIGF ratio was increased in one case. Timing between mothers' infection and the poor fetal outcome was ≤10 days in 4 cases. The massive placental damage are directly induced by the virus whose receptors are expressed on trophoblast, leading to trophoblast necrosis and massive inflammation in villous chamber, in a similar way it occurs in diffuse alveolar damage in adults infected by SARS-Cov-2. DISCUSSION: SARS-Cov-2 can be associated to a rare set of placental lesions which can lead to fetal demise, preterm birth, or growth restriction. Stronger surveillance of mothers infected by SARS-Cov-2 is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Placenta Diseases/etiology , Premature Birth/etiology , Stillbirth , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Fetal Death/etiology , France , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Perinatal Death/etiology , Placenta/pathology , Placenta/virology , Placenta Diseases/diagnosis , Placenta Diseases/pathology , Placenta Diseases/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/pathology , Premature Birth/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Trophoblasts/pathology , Trophoblasts/virology
10.
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol ; 57(4): 573-581, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1162971

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Few large cohort studies have reported data on maternal, fetal, perinatal and neonatal outcomes associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in pregnancy. We report the outcome of infected pregnancies from a collaboration formed early during the pandemic between the investigators of two registries, the UK and Global Pregnancy and Neonatal outcomes in COVID-19 (PAN-COVID) study and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine (SONPM) National Perinatal COVID-19 Registry. METHODS: This was an analysis of data from the PAN-COVID registry (1 January to 25 July 2020), which includes pregnancies with suspected or confirmed maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection at any stage in pregnancy, and the AAP-SONPM National Perinatal COVID-19 registry (4 April to 8 August 2020), which includes pregnancies with positive maternal testing for SARS-CoV-2 from 14 days before delivery to 3 days after delivery. The registries collected data on maternal, fetal, perinatal and neonatal outcomes. The PAN-COVID results are presented overall for pregnancies with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and separately in those with confirmed infection. RESULTS: We report on 4005 pregnant women with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (1606 from PAN-COVID and 2399 from AAP-SONPM). For obstetric outcomes, in PAN-COVID overall and in those with confirmed infection in PAN-COVID and AAP-SONPM, respectively, maternal death occurred in 0.5%, 0.5% and 0.2% of cases, early neonatal death in 0.2%, 0.3% and 0.3% of cases and stillbirth in 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.4% of cases. Delivery was preterm (< 37 weeks' gestation) in 12.0% of all women in PAN-COVID, in 16.1% of those women with confirmed infection in PAN-COVID and in 15.7% of women in AAP-SONPM. Extreme preterm delivery (< 27 weeks' gestation) occurred in 0.5% of cases in PAN-COVID and 0.3% in AAP-SONPM. Neonatal SARS-CoV-2 infection was reported in 0.9% of all deliveries in PAN-COVID overall, in 2.0% in those with confirmed infection in PAN-COVID and in 1.8% in AAP-SONPM; the proportions of neonates tested were 9.5%, 20.7% and 87.2%, respectively. The rates of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) neonate were 8.2% in PAN-COVID overall, 9.7% in those with confirmed infection and 9.6% in AAP-SONPM. Mean gestational-age-adjusted birth-weight Z-scores were -0.03 in PAN-COVID and -0.18 in AAP-SONPM. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from the UK and USA registries of pregnancies with SARS-CoV-2 infection were remarkably concordant. Preterm delivery affected a higher proportion of women than expected based on historical and contemporaneous national data. The proportions of pregnancies affected by stillbirth, a SGA infant or early neonatal death were comparable to those in historical and contemporaneous UK and USA data. Although maternal death was uncommon, the rate was higher than expected based on UK and USA population data, which is likely explained by underascertainment of women affected by milder or asymptomatic infection in pregnancy in the PAN-COVID study, although not in the AAP-SONPM study. The data presented support strong guidance for enhanced precautions to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy, particularly in the context of increased risks of preterm delivery and maternal mortality, and for priority vaccination of pregnant women and women planning pregnancy. Copyright © 2021 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Fetal Growth Retardation/diagnosis , Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology , Fetal Growth Retardation/virology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Small for Gestational Age , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Maternal Mortality , Pandemics , Perinatal Death , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Premature Birth/diagnosis , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/virology , Registries , Stillbirth/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
11.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8871287, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facility-based death review committee (DRC) of neonatal deaths and stillbirths can encourage stakeholders to enhance the quality of care during the antenatal period and labour to improve birth outcomes. To understand the benefits and impact of the DRCs, this study was aimed at exploring the DRC members' perception about the role and benefits of the newly developed facility-based DRCs in five pilot hospitals in Jordan, to assess women empowerment, decision-making process, power dynamics, culture and genderism as contributing factors for deaths, and impact of COVID-19 lockdown on births. METHODS: A descriptive study of a qualitative design-using focus group discussions-was conducted after one year of establishing DRCs in 5 pilot large hospitals. The number of participants in each focus group ranged from 8 to10, and the total number of participants was 45 HCPs (nurses and doctors). Questions were consecutively asked in each focus group. The moderator asked the main questions from the guide and then used probing as needed. A second researcher observed the conversation and took field notes. RESULTS: Overall, there was an agreement among the majority of DRC members across all hospitals that the DRC was successful in identifying the exact cause of neonatal deaths and stillbirths as well as associated modifiable factors. There was also a consensus that the DRC contributed to an improvement in health services provided for pregnant women and newborns as well as protecting human rights and enabling women to be more interdependent in taking decisions related to family planning. Moreover, the DRC agreed that a proportion of the neonatal deaths and stillbirths occurring in the hospitals could have been prevented if adequate antenatal care was provided and some traditional harmful practices were avoided. CONCLUSIONS: Facility-based neonatal death review audit is practical and can be used to identify exact causes of maternal and neonatal deaths and is a valuable tool for hospital quality indicators. It can also change the perception and practice of health care providers, which may be reflected in improving the quality of provided healthcare services.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Perinatal Death , Stillbirth , Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Decision Making , Female , Focus Groups , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Human Rights , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Jordan , Perinatal Death/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prenatal Care
12.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(2): 100107, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064726

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to report pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of coronavirus spectrum infections, and particularly coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) disease because of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 infection during pregnancy. Data Sources: Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and Clinicaltrials.gov databases were searched electronically utilizing combinations of word variants for coronavirus or severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS or Middle East respiratory syndrome or MERS or COVID-19 and pregnancy. The search and selection criteria were restricted to English language. Study Eligibility Criteria: Inclusion criteria were hospitalized pregnant women with a confirmed coronavirus related-illness, defined as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), or COVID-19. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods: We used meta-analyses of proportions to combine data and reported pooled proportions, so that a pooled proportion may not coincide with the actual raw proportion in the results. The pregnancy outcomes observed included miscarriage, preterm birth, preeclampsia, preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, fetal growth restriction, and mode of delivery. The perinatal outcomes observed were fetal distress, Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes, neonatal asphyxia, admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, perinatal death, and evidence of vertical transmission. Results: Nineteen studies including 79 hospitalized women were eligible for this systematic review: 41 pregnancies (51.9%) affected by COVID-19, 12 (15.2%) by MERS, and 26 (32.9%) by SARS. An overt diagnosis of pneumonia was made in 91.8%, and the most common symptoms were fever (82.6%), cough (57.1%), and dyspnea (27.0%). For all coronavirus infections, the pooled proportion of miscarriage was 64.7% (8/12; 95% confidence interval, 37.9-87.3), although reported only for women affected by SARS in two studies with no control group; the pooled proportion of preterm birth <37 weeks was 24.3% (14/56; 95% confidence interval, 12.5-38.6); premature prelabor rupture of membranes occurred in 20.7% (6/34; 95% confidence interval, 9.5-34.9), preeclampsia in 16.2% (2/19; 95% confidence interval, 4.2-34.1), and fetal growth restriction in 11.7% (2/29; 95% confidence interval, 3.2-24.4), although reported only for women affected by SARS; 84% (50/58) were delivered by cesarean; the pooled proportion of perinatal death was 11.1% (5/60; 95% confidence interval, 84.8-19.6), and 57.2% of newborns (3/12; 95% confidence interval, 3.6-99.8) were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. When focusing on COVID-19, the most common adverse pregnancy outcome was preterm birth <37 weeks, occurring in 41.1% of cases (14/32; 95% confidence interval, 25.6-57.6), while the pooled proportion of perinatal death was 7.0% (2/41; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-16.3). None of the 41 newborns assessed showed clinical signs of vertical transmission. Conclusion: In hospitalized mothers infected with coronavirus infections, including COVID-19, >90% of whom also had pneumonia, preterm birth is the most common adverse pregnancy outcome. COVID-19 infection was associated with higher rate (and pooled proportions) of preterm birth, preeclampsia, cesarean, and perinatal death. There have been no published cases of clinical evidence of vertical transmission. Evidence is accumulating rapidly, so these data may need to be updated soon. The findings from this study can guide and enhance prenatal counseling of women with COVID-19 infection occurring during pregnancy, although they should be interpreted with caution in view of the very small number of included cases.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology , Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture/epidemiology , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Perinatal Death , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 224(6): 615.e1-615.e12, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-986941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Widespread lockdowns imposed during the coronavirus disease 2019 crisis may impact birth outcomes. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the association between the COVID-19 lockdown and the risk of adverse birth outcomes in Botswana. STUDY DESIGN: In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 crisis, Botswana enforced a lockdown that restricted movement within the country. We used data from an ongoing nationwide birth outcomes surveillance study to evaluate adverse outcomes (stillbirth, preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age fetuses, and neonatal death) and severe adverse outcomes (stillbirth, very preterm birth, very-small-for-gestational-age fetuses, and neonatal death) recorded prelockdown (January 1, 2020-April 2, 2020), during lockdown (April 3, 2020-May 7, 2020), and postlockdown (May 8, 2020-July 20, 2020). Using difference-in-differences analyses, we compared the net change in each outcome from the prelockdown to lockdown periods in 2020 relative to the same 2 periods in 2017-2019 with the net change in each outcome from the prelockdown to postlockdown periods in 2020 relative to the same 2 periods in 2017-2019. RESULTS: In this study, 68,448 women delivered a singleton infant in 2017-2020 between January 1 and July 20 and were included in our analysis (mean [interquartile range] age of mothers, 26 [22-32] years). Across the included calendar years and periods, the risk of any adverse outcome ranged from 27.92% to 31.70%, and the risk of any severe adverse outcome ranged from 8.40% to 11.38%. The lockdown period was associated with a 0.81 percentage point reduction (95% confidence interval, -2.95% to 1.30%) in the risk of any adverse outcome (3% relative reduction) and a 0.02 percentage point reduction (95% confidence interval, -0.79% to 0.75%) in the risk of any severe adverse outcome (0% relative reduction). The postlockdown period was associated with a 1.72 percentage point reduction (95% confidence, -3.42% to 0.02%) in the risk of any adverse outcome (5% relative reduction) and a 1.62 percentage point reduction (95% confidence interval, -2.69% to -0.55%) in the risk of any severe adverse outcome (14% relative reduction). Reductions in adverse outcomes were largest among women with human immunodeficiency virus and among women delivering at urban delivery sites, driven primarily by reductions in preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age fetuses. CONCLUSION: Adverse birth outcomes decreased from the prelockdown to postlockdown periods in 2020, relative to the change during the same periods in 2017-2019. Our findings may provide insights into associations between mobility and birth outcomes in Botswana and other low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Quarantine , Adult , Botswana/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Humans , Infant, Small for Gestational Age , Perinatal Death , Pregnancy , Premature Birth/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 303(6): 1401-1405, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893273

ABSTRACT

KEY MESSAGE: Among SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers, vaginal delivery rates were high and associated with favorable outcomes with no cases of neonatal COVID-19. PURPOSE: To investigate the mode of delivery and its impact on immediate neonatal outcome in SARS-CoV-2-infected women. METHODS: A prospective study following pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 who delivered between March 15th and July 4th in seven university affiliated hospitals in Israel. RESULTS: A total of 52 women with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 delivered in the participating centers during the study period. The median gestational age at the time of delivery was 38 weeks, with 16 (30.8%) cases complicated by spontaneous preterm birth. Forty-three women (82.7%) underwent a trial of labor. The remaining 9 women underwent pre-labor cesarean delivery mostly due to obstetric indications, whereas one woman with a critical COVID-19 course underwent urgent cesarean delivery due to maternal deterioration. Among those who underwent a trial of labor (n = 43), 39 (90.7%) delivered vaginally, whereas 4 (9.3%) cases resulted in cesarean delivery. Neonatal RT-PCR nasopharyngeal swabs tested negative in all cases, and none of the infants developed pneumonia. No maternal and neonatal deaths were encountered. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective study among SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers, vaginal delivery rates were high and associated with favorable outcomes with no cases of neonatal COVID-19. Our findings underscore that delivery management among SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers should be based on obstetric indications and may potentially reduce the high rates of cesarean delivery previously reported in this setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Delivery, Obstetric/adverse effects , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Israel/epidemiology , Pandemics , Perinatal Death , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/virology , Prospective Studies , Vagina , Young Adult
16.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 18126, 2020 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889217

ABSTRACT

This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on pregnant women. We searched for qualified studies in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. The clinical characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 and their infants were reported as means and proportions with 95% confidence interval. Eleven studies involving with 9032 pregnant women with COVID-19 and 338 infants were included in the meta-analysis. Pregnant women with COVID-19 have relatively mild symptoms. However, abnormal proportions of laboratory parameters were similar or even increased, compared to general population. Around 30% of pregnant women with COVID-19 experienced preterm delivery, whereas the mean birth weight was 2855.9 g. Fetal death and detection of SARS-CoV-2 were observed in about 2%, whereas neonatal death was found to be 0.4%. In conclusion, the current review will serve as an ideal basis for future considerations in the treatment and management of COVID-19 in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Perinatal Death/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Premature Birth/etiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Birth Weight , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Fetal Death/etiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Am J Obstet Gynecol ; 224(4): 389.e1-389.e9, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 may be associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnancy, but there are few controlled data to quantify the magnitude of these risks or to characterize the epidemiology and risk factors. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to quantify the associations of coronavirus disease 2019 with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnancy and to characterize the epidemiology and risk factors. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a matched case-control study of pregnant patients with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 cases who delivered between 16 and 41 weeks' gestation from March 11 to June 11, 2020. Uninfected pregnant women (controls) were matched to coronavirus disease 2019 cases on a 2:1 ratio based on delivery date. Maternal demographic characteristics, coronavirus disease 2019 symptoms, laboratory evaluations, obstetrical and neonatal outcomes, and clinical management were chart abstracted. The primary outcomes included (1) a composite of adverse maternal outcome, defined as preeclampsia, venous thromboembolism, antepartum admission, maternal intensive care unit admission, need for mechanical ventilation, supplemental oxygen, or maternal death, and (2) a composite of adverse neonatal outcome, defined as respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, 5-minute Apgar score of <5, persistent category 2 fetal heart rate tracing despite intrauterine resuscitation, or neonatal death. To quantify the associations between exposure to mild and severe or critical coronavirus disease 2019 and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, unadjusted and adjusted analyses were performed using conditional logistic regression (to account for matching), with matched-pair odds ratio and 95% confidence interval based on 1000 bias-corrected bootstrap resampling as the effect measure. Associations were adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 61 confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 cases were enrolled during the study period (mild disease, n=54 [88.5%]; severe disease, n=6 [9.8%]; critical disease, n=1 [1.6%]). The odds of adverse composite maternal outcome were 3.4 times higher among cases than controls (18.0% vs 8.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-13.4). The odds of adverse composite neonatal outcome were 1.7 times higher in the case group than to the control group (18.0% vs 13.9%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-4.8). Stratified analyses by disease severity indicated that the morbidity associated with coronavirus disease 2019 in pregnancy was largely driven by the severe or critical disease phenotype. Major risk factors for associated morbidity were black and Hispanic race, advanced maternal age, medical comorbidities, and antepartum admissions related to coronavirus disease 2019. CONCLUSION: Coronavirus disease 2019 during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, an association that is primarily driven by morbidity associated with severe or critical coronavirus disease 2019. Black and Hispanic race, obesity, advanced maternal age, medical comorbidities, and antepartum admissions related to coronavirus disease 2019 are risk factors for associated morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/ethnology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Logistic Models , Maternal Age , Perinatal Death/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/ethnology , Pregnancy Outcome , Risk Factors
18.
J Med Case Rep ; 14(1): 186, 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-818136

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A novel coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, was first reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The virus, known as COVID-19, is recognized as a potentially life-threatening disease by causing severe respiratory disease. Since this virus has not previously been detected in humans, there is a paucity of information regarding its effects on humans. In addition, only limited or no information exists about its impact during pregnancy. CASE PRESENTATION: In the present case study, we report the death of a neonate born to a 32-year-old mother with coronavirus disease 2019 in Ilam, Iran, with Kurdish ethnicity. We report the infection and death of a neonate in Iran with a chest X-ray (CXR) marked abnormality 2 hours after birth demonstrating coronavirus disease 2019 disease. The neonate was born by elective cesarean section, the fetal health was assessed using fetal heart rate and a non-stress test before the birth, and there was no evidence of fetal distress. All the above-mentioned facts and radiographic abnormalities suggested that coronavirus disease 2019 is involved. CONCLUSIONS: In this case study, we report the death of a neonate born to a mother with coronavirus disease 2019, 11 hours after birth. There is a paucity of data on the vertical transmission and the adverse maternal-fetal consequences of this disease, so vertical transmission from mother to child remains to be confirmed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care/methods , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Clinical Deterioration , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/physiopathology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Iran , Neonatal Screening/methods , Perinatal Death , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Perinat Med ; 48(9): 950-958, 2020 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797424

ABSTRACT

Objectives To evaluate the strength of association between maternal and pregnancy characteristics and the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes in pregnancies with laboratory confirmed COVID-19. Methods Secondary analysis of a multinational, cohort study on all consecutive pregnant women with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from February 1, 2020 to April 30, 2020 from 73 centers from 22 different countries. A confirmed case of COVID-19 was defined as a positive result on real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay of nasal and pharyngeal swab specimens. The primary outcome was a composite adverse fetal outcome, defined as the presence of either abortion (pregnancy loss before 22 weeks of gestations), stillbirth (intrauterine fetal death after 22 weeks of gestation), neonatal death (death of a live-born infant within the first 28 days of life), and perinatal death (either stillbirth or neonatal death). Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate parameters independently associated with the primary outcome. Logistic regression was reported as odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Mean gestational age at diagnosis was 30.6±9.5 weeks, with 8.0% of women being diagnosed in the first, 22.2% in the second and 69.8% in the third trimester of pregnancy. There were six miscarriage (2.3%), six intrauterine device (IUD) (2.3) and 5 (2.0%) neonatal deaths, with an overall rate of perinatal death of 4.2% (11/265), thus resulting into 17 cases experiencing and 226 not experiencing composite adverse fetal outcome. Neither stillbirths nor neonatal deaths had congenital anomalies found at antenatal or postnatal evaluation. Furthermore, none of the cases experiencing IUD had signs of impending demise at arterial or venous Doppler. Neonatal deaths were all considered as prematurity-related adverse events. Of the 250 live-born neonates, one (0.4%) was found positive at RT-PCR pharyngeal swabs performed after delivery. The mother was tested positive during the third trimester of pregnancy. The newborn was asymptomatic and had negative RT-PCR test after 14 days of life. At logistic regression analysis, gestational age at diagnosis (OR: 0.85, 95% CI 0.8-0.9 per week increase; p<0.001), birthweight (OR: 1.17, 95% CI 1.09-1.12.7 per 100 g decrease; p=0.012) and maternal ventilatory support, including either need for oxygen or CPAP (OR: 4.12, 95% CI 2.3-7.9; p=0.001) were independently associated with composite adverse fetal outcome. Conclusions Early gestational age at infection, maternal ventilatory supports and low birthweight are the main determinants of adverse perinatal outcomes in fetuses with maternal COVID-19 infection. Conversely, the risk of vertical transmission seems negligible.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Fetal Death , Perinatal Death , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Women Birth ; 33(6): 540-543, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693295

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid changes to how maternity health care is delivered has occurred in many countries across the globe in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Maternity care provisions have been challenged attempting to balance the needs and safety of pregnant women and their care providers. Women experiencing a pregnancy after loss (PAL) during these times face particularly difficult circumstances. AIM: In this paper we highlight the situation in three high income countries (Australia, Ireland and USA) and point to the need to remember the unique and challenging circumstances of these PAL families. We suggest new practices may be deviating from established evidence-based guidelines and outline the potential ramifications of these changes. FINDINGS: Recommendations for health care providers are suggested to bridge the gap between the necessary safety requirements due to the pandemic, the role of the health care provider, and the needs of families experiencing a pregnancy after loss. DISCUSSION: Changes to practices i.e. limiting the number of antenatal appointments and access to a support person may have detrimental effects on both mother, baby, and their family. However, new guidelines in maternity care practices developed to account for the pandemic have not necessarily considered women experiencing pregnancy after loss. CONCLUSION: Bereaved mothers and their families experiencing a pregnancy after loss should continue to be supported during the COVID-19 pandemic to limit unintended consequences.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Mothers/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnant Women/psychology , Stillbirth/psychology , Abortion, Spontaneous , Australia , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Ireland , Pandemics , Perinatal Death , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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