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PLoS Biol ; 20(2): e3001285, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662437

ABSTRACT

Amid the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, preprints in the biomedical sciences are being posted and accessed at unprecedented rates, drawing widespread attention from the general public, press, and policymakers for the first time. This phenomenon has sharpened long-standing questions about the reliability of information shared prior to journal peer review. Does the information shared in preprints typically withstand the scrutiny of peer review, or are conclusions likely to change in the version of record? We assessed preprints from bioRxiv and medRxiv that had been posted and subsequently published in a journal through April 30, 2020, representing the initial phase of the pandemic response. We utilised a combination of automatic and manual annotations to quantify how an article changed between the preprinted and published version. We found that the total number of figure panels and tables changed little between preprint and published articles. Moreover, the conclusions of 7.2% of non-COVID-19-related and 17.2% of COVID-19-related abstracts undergo a discrete change by the time of publication, but the majority of these changes do not qualitatively change the conclusions of the paper.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Information Dissemination/methods , Peer Review, Research/trends , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Publications/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peer Review, Research/methods , Peer Review, Research/standards , Periodicals as Topic/standards , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Publications/standards , Publications/statistics & numerical data , Publishing/standards , Publishing/statistics & numerical data , Publishing/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
3.
Zool Res ; 43(1): 1-2, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627787
5.
Gynecol Endocrinol ; 38(1): 1, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621371
7.
J Comp Neurol ; 529(1): 3-7, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574546
10.
Br J Anaesth ; 128(1): 1-3, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525704

ABSTRACT

The British Journal of Anaesthesia (BJA) had an eventful 2021, following what was a cataclysmic 2020 for the whole world. Despite the tragic challenges of multiple waves of the COVID-19 pandemic and the unparalleled burdens this created for everyone working in anaesthesia and critical care, the BJA underwent a major transformation during 2021. The BJA strongly supported research and education relevant to the pandemic, and to the broader missions of anaesthesia, critical, and pain medicine. Innovations to the BJA in 2021 included a special section on COVID-19 and the Anaesthetist; a new open access journal in the BJA stable; creation of a new social media editor position; new webinar and author interview series; transition to a new manuscript management system; and a move away from paper to electronic publication.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19 , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Anesthesiology , Humans , Publishing/trends , Social Media , United Kingdom
12.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(4): e34-e35, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360151

ABSTRACT

This article reflects on the importance and the impact of scientific publications in the midst of a global health crisis. It aims to raise awareness about the responsibility of accepting manuscripts in such sensitive times and is intended to motivate the production of high-quality papers through a critical vision.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Periodicals as Topic/standards , Humans , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Publications/standards , Publications/trends
13.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(8): 1051, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331323
15.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(15)2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223141

ABSTRACT

Humans learn about the world by collectively acquiring information, filtering it, and sharing what we know. Misinformation undermines this process. The repercussions are extensive. Without reliable and accurate sources of information, we cannot hope to halt climate change, make reasoned democratic decisions, or control a global pandemic. Most analyses of misinformation focus on popular and social media, but the scientific enterprise faces a parallel set of problems-from hype and hyperbole to publication bias and citation misdirection, predatory publishing, and filter bubbles. In this perspective, we highlight these parallels and discuss future research directions and interventions.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/ethics , Health Communication/ethics , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Health Communication/trends , Humans , Mass Media/ethics , Mass Media/trends , Periodicals as Topic/ethics
17.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 21(1): 50, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133581

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of infectious diseases generate outbreaks of scientific evidence. In 2016 epidemics of Zika virus emerged, and in 2020, a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We compared patterns of scientific publications for the two infections to analyse the evolution of the evidence. METHODS: We annotated publications on Zika virus and SARS-CoV-2 that we collected using living evidence databases according to study design. We used descriptive statistics to categorise and compare study designs over time. RESULTS: We found 2286 publications about Zika virus in 2016 and 21,990 about SARS-CoV-2 up to 24 May 2020, of which we analysed a random sample of 5294 (24%). For both infections, there were more epidemiological than laboratory science studies. Amongst epidemiological studies for both infections, case reports, case series and cross-sectional studies emerged first, cohort and case-control studies were published later. Trials were the last to emerge. The number of preprints was much higher for SARS-CoV-2 than for Zika virus. CONCLUSIONS: Similarities in the overall pattern of publications might be generalizable, whereas differences are compatible with differences in the characteristics of a disease. Understanding how evidence accumulates during disease outbreaks helps us understand which types of public health questions we can answer and when.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Publications/statistics & numerical data , Publications/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Zika Virus Infection/prevention & control , Zika Virus/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Periodicals as Topic/trends , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Zika Virus/physiology , Zika Virus Infection/epidemiology , Zika Virus Infection/virology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090330

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is an ongoing global health crisis with unmatched outcomes and effects. This pandemic has caused an infodemic of article publication in scientific journals. Dental journals have been active in the publication of COVID-19 related articles from the beginning of the pandemic. In this cross-sectional survey, we present an analysis of the scientific output of dental journals on COVID-19. The PubMed COVID-19 database was searched with the "Dental Journals" filter. Data including journal name, country, month of publication and number of citations were recorded. Science mapping analysis of the most used keywords was also performed. The search retrieved a total of 659 articles, of which 28 were excluded. Oral Diseases has published the most COVID-19 articles (15.1%), followed by the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (8.6%) and the Journal of Dental Education (7.9%). Most of the articles were from researchers from the United States (168), United Kingdom (120) and Brazil (83). The number of citations of the published articles ranged from 0 to 406, with most articles (64.2%) having no citations. Science Mapping analysis revealed that the most used keywords were coronavirus infections, pandemics and humans. The dental community has been active in the publication of COVID-19 articles from the beginning of the pandemic. The papers published by dental journals explore issues such as the management of clinical practices during the outbreak, infection control in the dental setting, signs and symptoms of COVID-19 affecting the oral cavity, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on educational and clinical programs.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , COVID-19 , Dentistry , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Brazil , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , United Kingdom , United States
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