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1.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 700, 2022 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression and anxiety are topical concerns worldwide, especially among adolescents. Besides, biological rhythm disorder as a candidate mechanism for mood disorders is highly prevalent, but relevant research among adolescents in China is presently limited. We conducted the present study to investigate the distribution of multi-dimensional self-rating biological rhythm disorder and the association of self-rating biological rhythm disorders with depression and anxiety symptoms among Chinese adolescents in different academic stages. METHODS: In the cross-sectional study, 3693 students aged 11-23 from Zhengzhou City, Henan Province, China were included. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and General Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) were used to evaluate symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively. Additionally, the Self-Rating of Biological Rhythm Disorder for Adolescents (SBRDA) was used to assess status of biological rhythm disorders. Multivariate logistic regression was developed to explore factors potentially associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety stratified by academic stages. RESULTS: Among all participants, 44.14 and 36.15% suffered from depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. On average, participants scored 74.66 ± 19.37 on the measure of total biological rhythm disorder. Adjusted for demographic confounding factors, the logistic regression analysis showed higher scores of total biological rhythm disorder were associated with more severe depression (OR = 14.38, 95%CI: 11.38-18.16) and anxiety symptoms (OR = 11.63, 95%CI: 9.14-14.81). The similar results were also found in the stratified analysis by academic stages. CONCLUSIONS: Self-rating biological rhythm disorders are significantly associated with depression and anxiety symptoms among adolescents. Discrepancy across academic stages should also be taken into account in establishing public health strategies.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Depression , Adolescent , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Anxiety/diagnosis , China/epidemiology , Periodicity
2.
Neuropsychopharmacol Rep ; 42(3): 315-322, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disruptions in biological rhythm (BR) are considered a factor in the spread of many chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and depression. It has been shown that imbalance in BR disrupts the body's physiological timings; therefore, it is essential to have a tool for BR evaluation. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 403 Jordanian participants (200 depressed people and 203 control groups). Classical test theory (CTT) was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of BRIAN. We aimed to validate the Arabic version of Biological Rhythms Interview Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) by investigating its internal consistency and validity, assessing its factor structure, and exploring its relationships with depression and sleep disorders. RESULTS: The internal consistency (α) was 0.91. The concurrent validity was supported by the severity of depression and sleep disorders (r = 0.87, r = 0.83, p < 0.001). The BRIAN's ability to differentiate between depressed people and the control group supported its discriminant validity (t = 21.2, p = 0.001). With a sensitivity of 75 and a specificity of 95.57, BRIAN revealed good accuracy in distinguishing between depressed and non-depressed persons at cutoff 44. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) analyses supported its proposed three-factor solutions. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that the BRIAN-A has acceptable validity in detecting BR and could be useful in examining the impact of circadian disturbance on the Arabic population.


Subject(s)
Neuropsychiatry , Sleep Wake Disorders , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Periodicity , Reproducibility of Results , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
3.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0271285, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021870

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: When facing major emergency public accidents, men and women may react differently. Our research aimed to assess the influence of gender difference on social support, information preference, biological rhythm, psychological distress, and the possible interaction among these factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 3,237 respondents aged 12 years and older finished the online survey. Levels of social support, information preference, biological rhythm, and psychological distress were assessed using validated scales. A path analysis was conducted to explore possible associations among these variables. RESULTS: The path analysis indicated that women with high levels of social support had a lower possibility of biological rhythm disorders and lower levels of somatization symptoms of psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic. The influence of social support on somatization symptoms was exerted via biological rhythm. Women tended to believe both negative and positive information, while men preferred more extreme information. CONCLUSION: Our results highlighted gender difference in study variables during the COVID-19 pandemic and the importance of social support in alleviating psychological distress and biological rhythm disorders. Moreover, we confirmed that information preference differed significantly by somatization symptoms of psychological distress, suggesting extra efforts to provide more individualized epidemic information. Longitudinal research is required to further explore casual inferences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Periodicity , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(2): 299-300, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684479
5.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(1): 84-90, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621519

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has introduced acute and persistent psychosocial stressors for many individuals, with emerging gender differences that suggest women may be at greater risk for poorer mental health outcomes. This may have unintended consequences for women's overall health and well-being, including disruptions to reproductive function as elevated stress is often associated with menstrual cycle irregularities. The objective of this study was to determine if and how the COVID-19 pandemic and its related stressors have impacted women's menstrual cyclicity. Materials and Methods: An online survey instrument designed to capture self-reported information on menstrual cycle changes and perceived stress levels was distributed between July and August 2020. A total of 210 women between the ages of 18-45 years met stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria and completed the survey. Results: Of the 210 respondents, more than half (54%) reported changes in their menstrual cycles. These included changes in menstrual cycle length (50%), the duration of menses (34%), and changes in premenstrual symptoms (50%). Respondents with high perceived stress scale (PSS) scores during Covid were more likely to experience a longer duration of menses (p < 0.001) and heavier bleeding during menses (p = 0.028) compared with those with moderate Covid PSS scores. Conclusions: By uncovering a trend in increased menstrual cycle irregularities during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study contributes to our understanding of the implications that the pandemic may have on women's reproductive health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Menstrual Cycle , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Periodicity , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
QJM ; 114(11): 773-779, 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Acute Medical Unit (AMU) provides care for unscheduled hospital admissions. Seven-day consultant presence and morning AMU discharges have been advocated to improve hospital bed management. AIMS: To determine whether a later time of daily peak AMU occupancy correlates with measures of hospital stress; whether 7-day consultant presence, for COVID-19, abolished weekly periodicity of discharges. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis. METHODS: : Anonymised AMU admission and discharge times were retrieved from the Profile Information Management System (PIMS), at a large, urban hospital from 14 April 2014 to 31 December 2018 and 20 March to 2 May 2020 (COVID-19 peak). Minute-by-minute admission and discharge times were combined to construct a running total of AMU bed occupancy. Fourier transforms were used to determine periodicity. We tested association between (i) average AMU occupancy and (ii) time of peak AMU occupancy, with measures of hospital stress (total medical bed occupancy and 'medical outliers' on non-medical wards). RESULTS: : Daily, weekly and seasonal patterns of AMU bed occupancy were evident. Timing of AMU peak occupancy was unrelated to each measure of hospital stress: total medical inpatients (Spearman's rho, rs = 0.04, P = 0.24); number of medical outliers (rs = -0.06, P = 0.05). During COVID-19, daily bed occupancy was similar, with continuation of greater Friday and Monday discharges than the weekend. CONCLUSIONS: : Timing of peak AMU occupancy did not alter with hospital stress. Efforts to increase morning AMU discharges are likely to have little effect on hospital performance. Seven-day consultant presence did not abolish weekly periodicity of discharges-other factors influence weekend discharges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bed Occupancy , Hospitals , Humans , Length of Stay , Periodicity , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e051409, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476602

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To summarise the literature on frequent attendances to hospital emergency departments (EDs) and describe sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of children who attend EDs frequently. SETTING: Hospital EDs. PARTICIPANTS: Children <21 years, attending hospital EDs frequently. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcomes measures were defined separately in each study, and were predominantly the number of ED attendances per year. RESULTS: We included 21 studies representing 6 513 627 children. Between 0.3% and 75% of all paediatric ED users were frequent users. Most studies defined four or more visits per year as a 'frequent ED' usage. Children who were frequent ED users were more likely to be less than 5 years old. In the USA, patients with public insurance were more likely to be frequent attenders. Frequent ED users more likely to be frequent users of primary care and have long-term conditions; the most common diagnoses were infections and gastroenteritis. CONCLUSIONS: The review included a wide range of information across various health systems, however, children who were frequent ED users have some universal characteristics in common. Policies to reduce frequent attendance might usefully focus on preschool children and supporting primary care in responding to primary care oriented conditions.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital , Primary Health Care , Child , Child, Preschool , Hospitals , Humans , Medical Assistance , Periodicity
8.
Curr Biol ; 30(14): R795-R797, 2020 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592273

ABSTRACT

In modern societies, human rest-activity rhythms and sleep result from the tensions and dynamics between the conflicting poles of external social time (e.g., work hours and leisure activities) and an individual's internal biological time. A mismatch between the two has been suggested to induce 'social jetlag' [1] and 'social sleep restriction', that is, shifts in sleep timing and differences in sleep duration between work days and free days. Social jetlag [2,3] and sleep restrictions [4] have repeatedly been associated with negative consequences on health, mental wellbeing, and performance. In a large-scale quasi-experimental design, we investigated the effects of the phase with the most rigorous COVID-19 restrictions on the relationship between social and biological rhythms as well as sleep during a six-week period (mid-March until end of April 2020) in three European societies (Austria, Germany, Switzerland). We found that, on one hand, the restrictions reduced the mismatch between external (social) and internal (biological) sleep-wake timing, as indexed by significant reductions in social jetlag and social sleep restriction, with a concomitant increase in sleep duration. Sleep quality on the other hand was slightly reduced. The improved individual sleep-wake timing can presumably be attributed to an increased flexibility of social schedules, for instance due to more work being accomplished from home. However, this unprecedented situation also led to a significant increase in self-perceived burden, which was attendant to the decrease in sleep quality. These adverse effects may be alleviated by exposure to natural daylight as well as physical exercise.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Periodicity , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sleep , Austria/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Chronobiology Disorders/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Switzerland/epidemiology
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