Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 35
Filter
1.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
2.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(4): 262-269, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286605

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article will review current guidelines regarding surgical protocols for elective and nonelective surgeries during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Perioperative management for surgical patients should be modified to promote the safety and wellbeing of patients and caregivers amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 testing should be performed preoperatively with subsequent preprocedure quarantine. Nonemergent or nonlife-threatening surgery should be postponed for COVID-19 positive patients. The consensus of surgical societies is to use a laparoscopic surgical approach for COVID-19 positive patients when appropriate and to avoid port venting at the end of procedures. For COVID-19 positive patients requiring an emergent procedure, the use of personal protective equipment is strongly recommended. SUMMARY: After over a year of the COVID-19 pandemic, effective protocols and precautions have been established to decrease the morbidity and mortality of patients undergoing surgery and to promote the safety of healthcare personnel. Continued investigations are necessary as cases of new, possibly more virulent, strains of the virus arise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Female , Humans , Laparoscopy , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Plast Surg Nurs ; 41(1): 36-39, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218019

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a pandemic, challenging health care systems all over the world. National health care systems have reorganized to cope with the disease. Surgical services departments around the world have been affected and elective surgical procedures have been postponed to conserve medical resources. When a patient with COVID-19 requires an urgent microsurgical free flap due to trauma or a tumor, personnel from the health care facility must have a protocol in place to follow for the patient's care and follow-up. In this article, we present our protocol for patients with COVID-19 requiring reconstructive microsurgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Free Tissue Flaps/transplantation , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Microsurgery/methods , Perioperative Care/methods , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Protocols , Hospitals, University , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Microsurgery/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Spain
5.
World J Emerg Surg ; 16(1): 14, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the COVID-19 pandemic has occurred, nations showed their unpreparedness to deal with a mass casualty incident of this proportion and severity, which resulted in a tremendous number of deaths even among healthcare workers. The World Society of Emergency Surgery conceived this position paper with the purpose of providing evidence-based recommendations for the management of emergency surgical patients under COVID-19 pandemic for the safety of the patient and healthcare workers. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) through the MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and SCOPUS databases. Synthesis of evidence, statements and recommendations were developed in accordance with the GRADE methodology. RESULTS: Given the limitation of the evidence, the current document represents an effort to join selected high-quality articles and experts' opinion. CONCLUSIONS: The aim of this position paper is to provide an exhaustive guidelines to perform emergency surgery in a safe and protected environment for surgical patients and for healthcare workers under COVID-19 and to offer the best management of COVID-19 patients needing for an emergency surgical treatment. We recommend screening for COVID-19 infection at the emergency department all acute surgical patients who are waiting for hospital admission and urgent surgery. The screening work-up provides a RT-PCR nasopharyngeal swab test and a baseline (non-contrast) chest CT or a chest X-ray or a lungs US, depending on skills and availability. If the COVID-19 screening is not completed we recommend keeping the patient in isolation until RT-PCR swab test result is not available, and to manage him/she such as an overt COVID patient. The management of COVID-19 surgical patients is multidisciplinary. If an immediate surgical procedure is mandatory, whether laparoscopic or via open approach, we recommend doing every effort to protect the operating room staff for the safety of the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Emergencies , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Laparoscopy/methods , Laparoscopy/standards , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/methods , Personal Protective Equipment , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods
6.
Dig Surg ; 38(2): 158-165, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105564

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This survey aimed to register changes determined by the COVID-19 pandemic on pancreatic surgery in a specific geographic area (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) to evaluate the impact of the pandemic and obtain interesting cues for the future. METHODS: An online survey was designed using Google Forms focusing on the local impact of the pandemic on pancreatic surgery. The survey was conducted at 2 different time points, during and after the lockdown. RESULTS: Twenty-five respondents (25/56) completed the survey. Many aspects of oncological care have been affected with restrictions and delays: staging, tumor board, treatment selection, postoperative course, adjuvant treatments, outpatient care, and follow-up. Overall, 60% of respondents have prioritized pancreatic cancer patients according to stage, age, and comorbidities, and 40% opted not to operate high-risk patients. However, for 96% of participants, the standards of care were guaranteed. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic had an important impact on pancreatic cancer surgery in central Europe. Guidelines for prompt interventions and prevention of the spread of viral infections in the surgical environment are needed to avoid a deterioration of care in cancer patients in the event of a second wave or a new pandemic. High-volume centers for pancreatic surgery should be preferred and their activity maintained. Virtual conferences have proven to be efficient during this pandemic and should be implemented in the near future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Pancreatectomy/trends , Pancreatic Neoplasms/surgery , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , Aftercare/trends , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/trends , Neoplasm Staging , Pancreatectomy/standards , Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Time-to-Treatment/standards , Time-to-Treatment/trends
7.
Surg Infect (Larchmt) ; 22(8): 818-827, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104786

ABSTRACT

Background: As the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues globally, high numbers of new infections are developing nationwide, particularly in the U.S. Midwest and along both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The need to accommodate growing numbers of hospitalized patients has led facilities in affected areas to suspend anew or curtail normal hospital activities, including elective surgery, even as earlier-affected areas normalized surgical services. Backlogged surgical cases now number in the tens of millions globally. Facilities will be hard-pressed to address these backlogs, even absent the recrudescence of COVID-19. This document provides guidance for the safe and effective resumption of surgical services as circumstances permit. Methods: Review and synthesis of pertinent international peer-reviewed literature, with integration of expert opinion. Results: The "second-wave" of serious infections is placing the healthcare system under renewed stress. Surgical teams likely will encounter persons harboring the virus, whether symptomatic or not. Continued vigilance and protection of patients and staff remain paramount. Reviewed are the impact of COVID-19 on the surgical workforce, considerations for operating on a COVID-19 patient and the outcomes of such operations, the size and nature of the surgical backlog, and the logistics of resumption, including organizational considerations, patient and staff safety, preparation of the surgical candidate, and the role of enhanced recovery programs to reduce morbidity, length of stay, and cost by rational, equitable resource utilization. Conclusions: Resumption of surgical services requires institutional commitment (including teams of surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, dieticians, and administrators). Structured protocols and equitable implementation programs, and iterative audit, planning, and integration will improve outcomes, enhance safety, preserve resources, and reduce cost, all of which will contribute to safe and successful reduction of the surgical backlog.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Facilities/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Perioperative Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
8.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 35(3): 321-332, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039303

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has potentiated the need for implementation of strict safety measures in the medical care of surgical patients - and especially in cardiac surgery patients, who are at a higher risk of COVID-19-associated morbidity and mortality. Such measures not only require minimization of patients' exposure to COVID-19 but also careful balancing of the risks of postponing nonemergent surgical procedures and providing appropriate and timely surgical care. We provide an overview of current evidence for preoperative strategies used in cardiac surgery patients, including risk stratification, telemedicine, logistical challenges during inpatient care, appropriate screening capacity, and decision-making on when to safely operate on COVID-19 patients. Further, we focus on perioperative measures such as safe operating room management and address the dilemma over when to perform cardiovascular surgical procedures in patients at risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/standards , Patient Safety/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/surgery , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Risk Factors
9.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(9): 2133-2140, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has generated enormous pressure on healthcare establishments, prompting the restructuring of services to rationalise resources. Complex head and neck reconstructive surgery in this setting may carry substantial risk to patients and staff. This paper outlines the management strategy and outcomes of major head and neck oncological cases at a single regional tertiary referral centre. METHODS: A database review was undertaken of consecutive patients undergoing major head and neck surgery and reconstruction during the COVID-19 pandemic at St Andrew's Centre for Plastic Surgery & Burns, Chelmsford UK. Patient demographics, tumour and reconstruction characteristics as well as peri­operative information were determined. Patients were prospectively contacted with regard to COVID-related symptoms and investigations. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients (15 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 67 years (range: 36-92 years) were included between March 1 and June 13, 2020. Patients underwent pre-operative throat swabs at 72 h and 24 h as well as chest CT scanning as part of a robust protocol. Twelve free flaps, four loco-regional flaps, four parotidectomies and 23 cervical lymphadenectomies were performed. Two patients required a return to theatre. No post-operative deaths occurred and flap survival rate was 100%. A single patient tested positive for COVID-19 pre-operatively and no post-operative COVID-19 infections occurred. CONCLUSION: Although head and neck surgery represents a high-risk procedure to patients and healthcare professionals, our institutional experience suggests that in the presence of a robust peri­operative protocol and judicious patient selection, major head and neck surgery, including free tissue transfer reconstruction, may be performed safely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/surgery , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Infection Control/methods , Perioperative Care/methods , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Clinical Protocols , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Neck Dissection , Patient Selection , Perioperative Care/standards , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Surgical Flaps , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom
11.
J Perioper Pract ; 31(1-2): 44-50, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965746

ABSTRACT

One of the priorities at our large Operating Theatres Department is to support awareness and basic education of the multi-disciplinary teams in clinical Human Factors, to help build competence and capacity in healthcare towards a resilient system. From May 2019 until February 2020, our Human Factors Champions embarked on a project called Observation of Non-technical Skills and Teamwork in the operating theatres (ONSeT), to monitor and evaluate the benefits of local Human Factors education. In September 2020, six months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit the UK and caused a major disruption of surgical services, we decided to investigate the usefulness of the project and the impact of COVID-19 in the operating theatres, looking through the eyes of the Human Factors Champions. Results pointed to a consensus about ONSeT having helped during the pandemic, with regards to how teams worked and in enabling team leaders to be more responsive. Human Factors Champions found that feedback on performance was received in a non-threatening way and observation of performance became 'second nature'. As organisations need to develop critical thinking, we think that the ONSeT project has helped us build some capacity for this, from the front-line onwards.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Personnel/standards , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Operating Rooms/standards , Patient Isolators/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E4, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954549

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has forced the modification of surgical practice worldwide. Medical centers have been adapted to provide an efficient arrangement of their economic and human resources. Although neurosurgeons are not in the first line of management and treatment of COVID-19 patients, they take care of patients with neurological pathology and potential severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, the authors describe their institutional actions against the pandemic and compare these actions with those in peer-reviewed publications. METHODS: The authors conducted a search using the MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases from the beginning of the pandemic until July 11, 2020, using the following terms: "Neurosurgery," "COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2," "reconversion/modification," "practice," "academy," and "teaching." Then, they created operational guidelines tailored for their institution to maximize resource efficiency and minimize risk for the healthcare personnel. RESULTS: According to the reviewed literature, the authors defined the following three changes that have had the greatest impact in neurosurgical practice during the COVID-19 pandemic: 1) changes in clinical practices; 2) changes in the medical care setting, including modifications of perioperative care; and 3) changes in the academic teaching methodology. CONCLUSIONS: The Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía "Manuel Velasco Suárez" is one of the major referral centers for treating highly complex neurosurgical pathologies in Mexico. Its clinical and neurosurgical practices have been modified with the implementation of specific interventions against the spread of COVID-19. These practical and simple actions are remarkably relevant in the context of the pandemic and can be adopted and suited by other healthcare centers according to their available resources to better prepare for the next event.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgical Procedures/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons/standards , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Perioperative Care/standards , Perioperative Care/trends , Personal Protective Equipment/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends
13.
J Perioper Pract ; 31(1-2): 18-23, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954999

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), has rapidly developed into a global pandemic and public health emergency. The transmission and virulence of this new pathogen have raised concern for how best to protect healthcare professionals while effectively providing care to the infected patient requiring surgery. Although negative pressure rooms are ideal for aerosol-generating procedures, such as intubation and extubation, most operating theatres are generally maintained at a positive pressure when compared with the surrounding areas. This article compares negative and positive pressure rooms and the advantages of a negative pressure environment in optimising clinical care and minimising the exposure of patients and health care professionals to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Operating Rooms/standards , Patient Isolators/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , Ventilation/standards , COVID-19 , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic
14.
Anesthesiology ; 132(6): 1346-1361, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944428

ABSTRACT

Healthcare systems worldwide are responding to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), an emerging infectious syndrome caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. Patients with COVID-19 can progress from asymptomatic or mild illness to hypoxemic respiratory failure or multisystem organ failure, necessitating intubation and intensive care management. Healthcare providers, and particularly anesthesiologists, are at the frontline of this epidemic, and they need to be aware of the best available evidence to guide therapeutic management of patients with COVID-19 and to keep themselves safe while doing so. Here, the authors review COVID-19 pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and potential therapeutics, with a focus on management of COVID-19-associated respiratory failure. The authors draw on literature from other viral epidemics, treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and recent publications on COVID-19, as well as guidelines from major health organizations. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the evidence currently available to guide management of critically ill patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/standards , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care/standards , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/standards , Pneumonia, Viral , Pulmonary Medicine/standards , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Anesthesiology ; 132(6): 1307-1316, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944427

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the new Coronavirus disease, COVID-19, has been involved in 77,262 cases in China as well as in 27 other countries as of February 24, 2020. Because the virus is novel to human beings, and there is no vaccine yet available, every individual is susceptible and can become infected. Healthcare workers are at high risk, and unfortunately, more than 3,000 healthcare workers in China have been infected. Anesthesiologists are among healthcare workers who are at an even higher risk of becoming infected because of their close contact with infected patients and high potential of exposure to respiratory droplets or aerosol from their patients' airways. In order to provide healthcare workers with updated recommendations on the management of patients in the perioperative setting as well as for emergency airway management outside of the operating room, the two largest anesthesia societies, the Chinese Society of Anesthesiology (CSA) and the Chinese Association of Anesthesiologists (CAA) have formed a task force to produce the recommendations. The task force hopes to help healthcare workers, particularly anesthesiologists, optimize the care of their patients and protect patients, healthcare workers, and the public from becoming infected. The recommendations were created mainly based on the practice and experience of anesthesiologists who provide care to patients in China. Therefore, adoption of these recommendations outside of China must be done with caution, and the local environment, culture, uniqueness of the healthcare system, and patients' needs should be considered. The task force will continuously update the recommendations and incorporate new information in future versions.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/standards , Coronavirus Infections , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/standards , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
16.
Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 49(5): 618-622, 2020 Oct 25.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934532

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To summarize the experience of perioperative prevention during double-lung transplantation for elderly patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Clinical data of 2 elderly patients with COVID-19 who underwent double-lung transplantation in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine in March 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. Perioperative protective measures were introduced in terms of medical staffing, respiratory tract, pressure injuries, air in operating room, instruments and equipment, pathological specimens, and information management. RESULTS: Two cases of double-lung transplantation were successfully completed, and the patients had no operation-related complications. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenator was successfully removed 2 to 4 days after surgery and the patients recovered well. There was no infection among medical staff. CONCLUSIONS: Adequate preoperative preparation, complete patient transfer procedures, proper placement of instruments and equipment, strengthening of intraoperative care management, and attention to prevention of pressure injury complications can maximize the safety of COVID-19 patients and medical staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Lung Transplantation , Pandemics , Perioperative Care , Pneumonia, Viral , Postoperative Complications , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Lung Transplantation/standards , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
17.
Can J Cardiol ; 36(11): 1826-1829, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898621

ABSTRACT

Although the incidence of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is on the decline, management of patients who present with STEMI continues to require significant health care resources. Earlier hospital discharge in low-risk patients who present with STEMI has been an area of focus in an attempt to reduce health care costs. As a result, discharge within 48-72 hours after successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention has increasingly become routine practice. Moreover, the current COVID-19 pandemic has led to enormous pressure on health care systems to find ways to increase bed capacity, preserve resources, and reduce the risk of exposure to patients and health care workers. In response to this goal, the Ottawa Heart Institute has developed and implemented a novel Very Early Hospital Discharge (VEHD) protocol. The VEHD protocol is a simple, 4-step algorithm designed to accurately and efficiently identify low-risk STEMI patients who can be safely discharged between 20 and 36 hours after successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention. When deemed eligible for VEHD predischarge tasks are completed by the treating medical and nursing team and the patient is discharged home. Follow-up is completed remotely via virtual care (48 hours, 7 days, 30 days), and in the outpatient cardiology clinic (4-6 weeks). Amid a worldwide COVID-19 pandemic we believe the VEHD protocol is a crucial step in maintaining exceptional quality of care, in terms of patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes, while concurrently decreasing the risk of nosocomial infections, and reducing resource utilization.


Subject(s)
Clinical Protocols , Perioperative Care , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Humans , Length of Stay/economics , Patient Discharge/economics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Perioperative Care/standards , Risk Assessment , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/economics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL