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1.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
6.
Dig Surg ; 38(2): 158-165, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105564

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This survey aimed to register changes determined by the COVID-19 pandemic on pancreatic surgery in a specific geographic area (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) to evaluate the impact of the pandemic and obtain interesting cues for the future. METHODS: An online survey was designed using Google Forms focusing on the local impact of the pandemic on pancreatic surgery. The survey was conducted at 2 different time points, during and after the lockdown. RESULTS: Twenty-five respondents (25/56) completed the survey. Many aspects of oncological care have been affected with restrictions and delays: staging, tumor board, treatment selection, postoperative course, adjuvant treatments, outpatient care, and follow-up. Overall, 60% of respondents have prioritized pancreatic cancer patients according to stage, age, and comorbidities, and 40% opted not to operate high-risk patients. However, for 96% of participants, the standards of care were guaranteed. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic had an important impact on pancreatic cancer surgery in central Europe. Guidelines for prompt interventions and prevention of the spread of viral infections in the surgical environment are needed to avoid a deterioration of care in cancer patients in the event of a second wave or a new pandemic. High-volume centers for pancreatic surgery should be preferred and their activity maintained. Virtual conferences have proven to be efficient during this pandemic and should be implemented in the near future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Pancreatectomy/trends , Pancreatic Neoplasms/surgery , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/standards , Aftercare/trends , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/trends , Neoplasm Staging , Pancreatectomy/standards , Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Time-to-Treatment/standards , Time-to-Treatment/trends
7.
Transpl Int ; 34(4): 612-621, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066771

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed the landscape of kidney transplantation in the United States and worldwide. In addition to adversely impacting allograft and patient survival in postkidney transplant recipients, the current pandemic has affected all aspects of transplant care, including transplant referrals and listing, organ donation rates, organ procurement and shipping, and waitlist mortality. Critical decisions were made during this period by transplant centers and individual transplant physicians taking into consideration patient safety and resource utilization. As countries have begun administering the COVID vaccines, new and important considerations pertinent to our transplant population have arisen. This comprehensive review focuses on the impact of COVID-19 on kidney transplantation rates, mortality, policy decisions, and the clinical management of transplanted patients infected with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Policy , Kidney Failure, Chronic/surgery , Kidney Transplantation/trends , Perioperative Care/trends , Tissue and Organ Procurement/trends , Waiting Lists/mortality , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Europe/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/mortality , Kidney Transplantation/methods , Kidney Transplantation/mortality , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/methods , Tissue and Organ Procurement/methods , Tissue and Organ Procurement/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
8.
Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ; 35(3): 321-332, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039303

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has potentiated the need for implementation of strict safety measures in the medical care of surgical patients - and especially in cardiac surgery patients, who are at a higher risk of COVID-19-associated morbidity and mortality. Such measures not only require minimization of patients' exposure to COVID-19 but also careful balancing of the risks of postponing nonemergent surgical procedures and providing appropriate and timely surgical care. We provide an overview of current evidence for preoperative strategies used in cardiac surgery patients, including risk stratification, telemedicine, logistical challenges during inpatient care, appropriate screening capacity, and decision-making on when to safely operate on COVID-19 patients. Further, we focus on perioperative measures such as safe operating room management and address the dilemma over when to perform cardiovascular surgical procedures in patients at risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/standards , Patient Safety/standards , Perioperative Care/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/surgery , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Risk Factors
9.
World Neurosurg ; 146: e1191-e1201, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1026721

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to affect all aspects of health care delivery, and neurosurgical practices are not immune to its impact. We aimed to evaluate neurosurgical practice patterns as well as the perioperative incidence of COVID-19 in neurosurgical patients and their outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective review of neurosurgical and neurointerventional cases at 2 tertiary centers during the first 3 months of the first peak of COVID-19 pandemic (March 8 to June 8) as well as following 3 months (post-peak pandemic; June 9 to September 9) was performed. Baseline characteristics, perioperative COVID-19 test results, modified Medically Necessary, Time-Sensitive (mMeNTS) score, and outcome measures were compared between COVID-19-positive and-negative patients through bivariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: In total, 652 neurosurgical and 217 neurointerventional cases were performed during post-peak pandemic period. Cervical spine, lumbar spine, functional/pain, cranioplasty, and cerebral angiogram cases were significantly increased in the postpandemic period. There was a 2.9% (35/1197) positivity rate for COVID-19 testing overall and 3.6% (13/363) positivity rate postoperatively. Age, mMeNTS score, complications, length of stay, case acuity, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, and disposition were significantly different between COVID-19-positive and-negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: A significant increase in elective case volume during the post-peak pandemic period is feasible with low and acceptable incidence of COVID-19 in neurosurgical patients. COVID-19-positive patients were younger, less likely to undergo elective procedures, had increased length of stay, had more complications, and were discharged to a location other than home. The mMeNTS score plays a role in decision-making for scheduling elective cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Perioperative Care/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , District of Columbia/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/methods , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 28(3): 481-489, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988421

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This review formulates the rationale for using enhanced recovery protocols (ERPs) to standardize and optimize perioperative care during this high-risk time to minimize poor outcomes owing to provider, patient, and system vulnerabilities. DATA SOURCES: n/a METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: A literature review using key Medical Subject Headings terms was performed-according to methods described by the Cochrane Collaboration and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines-on studies that described enhanced recovery and coronavirus disease (COVID-19). TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Modifications to our existing ERPs related to the COVID-19 pandemic should include new accommodations for patient education, preoperative COVID-19 testing, prehabilitation, and intraoperative infection as well as thromboembolism risk reduction. CONCLUSION: ERPs are evidence-based, best practice guidelines applied across the perioperative continuum to mitigate surgical stress, decrease complications, and accelerate recovery. These benefits are part of the high-value-care equation needed to solve the clinical, operational, and financial challenges of the current COVID-19 pandemic. The factors driving outcomes on ERPs, such as the provision of minimally invasive surgery, warrant careful consideration. Tracking patient outcomes and improving care in response to outcomes data are key to the success of clinical care protocols such as ERPs. Numerous emerging clinical registries and reporting systems have been activated to provide outcomes data on the impact of COVID-19. This will inform and change surgical practice as well as provide opportunity to learn if the advantages that surgeons, patients, and the healthcare system might gain from using ERPs during a pandemic are meaningful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Enhanced Recovery After Surgery , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Infection Control , Organizational Innovation , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/trends , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E4, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954549

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has forced the modification of surgical practice worldwide. Medical centers have been adapted to provide an efficient arrangement of their economic and human resources. Although neurosurgeons are not in the first line of management and treatment of COVID-19 patients, they take care of patients with neurological pathology and potential severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Here, the authors describe their institutional actions against the pandemic and compare these actions with those in peer-reviewed publications. METHODS: The authors conducted a search using the MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases from the beginning of the pandemic until July 11, 2020, using the following terms: "Neurosurgery," "COVID-19/SARS-CoV-2," "reconversion/modification," "practice," "academy," and "teaching." Then, they created operational guidelines tailored for their institution to maximize resource efficiency and minimize risk for the healthcare personnel. RESULTS: According to the reviewed literature, the authors defined the following three changes that have had the greatest impact in neurosurgical practice during the COVID-19 pandemic: 1) changes in clinical practices; 2) changes in the medical care setting, including modifications of perioperative care; and 3) changes in the academic teaching methodology. CONCLUSIONS: The Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía "Manuel Velasco Suárez" is one of the major referral centers for treating highly complex neurosurgical pathologies in Mexico. Its clinical and neurosurgical practices have been modified with the implementation of specific interventions against the spread of COVID-19. These practical and simple actions are remarkably relevant in the context of the pandemic and can be adopted and suited by other healthcare centers according to their available resources to better prepare for the next event.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgical Procedures/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons/standards , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Perioperative Care/standards , Perioperative Care/trends , Personal Protective Equipment/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends
13.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 22(6): 464-470, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-861976

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The objectives of this study among facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons (FPRS), include (1) quantifying the use of telemedicine, (2) examining the impact of novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) on telemedicine practices, (3) highlighting the types of telemedicine employed, (4) anticipating how telemedicine will be utilized in the future, and (5) describing FPRS' attitudes and understanding of telemedicine technologies. Study Type: Cross-sectional survey. Methods: A 6-13 question survey was sent to the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery membership. Descriptive analyses were performed, along with a Fisher's exact test. Results: We received 100 responses from a diverse group of surgeons across the United States. Overall, 91% of responders utilize telemedicine, of which 76.9% began during the COVID-19 pandemic. 33.3% of responders thought that their platforms were not Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant or were unsure. Of those that utilize telemedicine, the two biggest concerns were difficulties with physical examination (69.2%) and lack of human connection (44%). 75.8% of telemedicine utilizers plan to incorporate telemedicine into their practice moving forward. Of all responders, 71% believed that telemedicine will have a positive effect on the field of FPRS, although on univariate analysis those in practice >20 years were more likely to believe that there will be no effect or a negative effect (p = 0.014). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the adoption of telemedicine among FPRS in the United States. The great majority of responders plan to incorporate telemedicine into their practice even after the pandemic subsides and believe that telemedicine will have a net positive effect on the field of FPRS.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/trends , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Perioperative Care/methods , Surgeons , Surgery, Plastic/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , United States
14.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 28(3): 1289-1297, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-802708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the COVID-19 pandemic moves from rich to poor nations, the healthcare systems of developing countries have to deal with this extra burden. As cancer care cannot stop and surgery is the main mechanism for cure and palliation, it is important to provide safe and rational access to cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: From April 1st to May 1st, the committee of the Brazilian Society of Surgical Oncology (BSSO) was responsible for reviewing the literature and writing recommendations for perioperative cancer care in the context of limited resources during the pandemic. The recommendations were submitted to the BSSO board of directors. The orientations that were not consensual were removed and the suggestions were added to the text. From May 15 to 30th, the committee revised the recommendations, aligned them with the objectives of the work and standardize the text. DISCUSSION: The rational use of resources to reduce the risk of surgical cancer patients being operated on during the incubation period of a corona virus infection is important in this context. Prevalence of corona virus in the region, the need for surgery, surgical complexity, patient age and comorbidities, and availability of corona virus testing are central aspects in this matter and are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: We present a protocol, focused on the patients' outcomes, for safe and rational use of resources to reduce the risk of surgical cancer patients being operated on during the virus incubation period, in the context of areas with limited resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/trends , Surgical Oncology/trends , Brazil/epidemiology , Humans
15.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(4): 752-762, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-766587

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is widespread acknowledgement that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted surgical services. The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) sent out a survey to assess what impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the practice of thoracic oncology surgery. METHODS: All ESTS members were invited (13-20 April 2020) to complete an online questionnaire of 26 questions, designed by the ESTS learning affairs committee. RESULTS: The response rate was 23.0% and the completeness rate was 91.2%. The number of treated COVID-positive cases per hospital varied from fewer than 20 cases (30.6%) to more than 200 cases (22.7%) per hospital. Most hospitals (89.1%) postponed surgical procedures. All hospitals performed patient screening with a nasopharyngeal swab, but only 6.7% routinely tested health care workers. A total of 20% of respondents reported that multidisciplinary meetings were completely cancelled and 66%, that multidisciplinary decisions were not different from normal practice. Trends were recognized in prioritizing surgical patients based on age (younger than 70), type of surgery (lobectomy or less), size of tumour (T1-2) and lymph node involvement (N1). Sixty-three percent of respondents reported that surgeons were involved in daily care of COVID-19-positive patients. Fifty-three percent mentioned that full personal protective equipment was available to them when treating a COVID-19-positive patient. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has created issues for the safety of health care workers, and surgeons have been forced to change their routine practice. However, there was no consensus about surgical priorities in lung cancer patients, demonstrating the need for the production of specific guidelines.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/trends , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Europe , Global Health , Health Care Rationing/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/trends , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
16.
Transpl Int ; 33(11): 1453-1457, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-683583

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented public health emergency caused by the acute viral respiratory coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has drastically changed current practices in solid organ transplantation, markedly so for transplantation of the lungs, the major target of the virus. Although national and state authorities do not recommend postponing transplant procedures, most specialists are reluctant to proceed due to substantial uncertainty and increased risks in the midst of the pandemic. There is an urgent need for evidence-based directions to move forward. Here, we offer our insights as specialists at a high-volume center located in a geographical area with high infection rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Lung Transplantation/methods , Perioperative Care/methods , Tissue and Organ Harvesting/methods , Tissue and Organ Procurement/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Health Services Accessibility , Hospitals, High-Volume , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Lung Transplantation/trends , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/trends , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Tissue and Organ Harvesting/trends , Tissue and Organ Procurement/trends
17.
J Robot Surg ; 14(6): 917-920, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657356

ABSTRACT

Health care has changed in unprecedented ways since the first reported cases of COVID-19. With global case rates continuing to rise and government restrictions beginning to loosen, many worry that a second wave in our future. In many hospitals around the world, non-emergent surgeries were put on hold as hospitals were transformed into COVID centers. As surgeons and administrators do their best to reinstate non-emergent procedures, guidance is sought from any and all reliable sources. Robotic surgery has many known and demonstrated benefits over open surgery and often over conventional laparoscopy. In this commentary, we aim to highlight some of the advantages robotic surgery may offer during this uniquely challenging time in health care.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Robotic Surgical Procedures/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , SARS-CoV-2
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