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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 114, 2022 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962771

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Peripartum depression in and after pregnancy are common, reported by 11.9% of women worldwide, and the proportion was even higher during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of peripartum depression under the influence of COVID-19 in China. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, 2026 pregnant and postpartum women residing in Beijing, Wuhan, and Lanzhou of China were recruited from February 28 to April 9, 2020. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was used to assess their depressive symptoms. The women were divided into four subgroups based on pregnancy stage, and a binary logistic regression analysis was conducted on each subgroup. RESULTS: Under the influence of COVID-19, the prevalence rate of peripartum depression among Chinese women was 9.7%. It was 13.6, 10.8, 7.9 and 7.3% in the first, second, third trimester and puerperium, respectively. Regression analysis showed that the influence of current pregnancy status on movement (Mild vs. No, aORs were 3.89, P < 0.001, 2.92, P = 0.003, 1.58, P = 0.150 in the three trimesters, respectively; Severe vs. No, aORs were 13.00, 20.45, 5.38 in the three trimesters, respectively, all P < 0.05), and worries and fears about childbirth (aORs were 2.46, 2.96, 2.50 in the three trimesters, respectively, all P < 0.05) were associated with depression throughout pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence rate of peripartum depression during the COVID-19 outbreak in China was not higher than usual. The influence of current pregnancy status on movement, as well as worries and fears about childbirth were independent risk factors for peripartum depression throughout pregnancy during COVID-19. The stage of pregnancy should be considered when implementing interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Peripartum Period/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Patient Health Questionnaire , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimesters/psychology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Neoreviews ; 23(5): e345-e353, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833764
3.
JAMA ; 327(15): 1478-1487, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756509

ABSTRACT

Importance: There is limited comparative epidemiological evidence on outcomes associated with COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy; monitoring pregnancy outcomes in large populations is required. Objective: To evaluate peripartum outcomes following COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based retrospective cohort study in Ontario, Canada, using a birth registry linked with the provincial COVID-19 immunization database. All births between December 14, 2020, and September 30, 2021, were included. Exposures: COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy, COVID-19 vaccination after pregnancy, and no vaccination. Main Outcomes and Measures: Postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis, cesarean delivery (overall and emergency cesarean delivery), admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and low newborn 5-minute Apgar score (<7). Linear and robust Poisson regression was used to generate adjusted risk differences (aRDs) and risk ratios (aRRs), respectively, comparing cumulative incidence of outcomes in those who received COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy with those vaccinated after pregnancy and those with no record of COVID-19 vaccination at any point. Inverse probability of treatment weights were used to adjust for confounding. Results: Among 97 590 individuals (mean [SD] age, 31.9 [4.9] years), 22 660 (23%) received at least 1 dose of COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy (63.6% received dose 1 in the third trimester; 99.8% received an mRNA vaccine). Comparing those vaccinated during vs after pregnancy (n = 44 815), there were no significantly increased risks of postpartum hemorrhage (incidence: 3.0% vs 3.0%; aRD, -0.28 per 100 individuals [95% CI, -0.59 to 0.03]; aRR, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.82-1.02]), chorioamnionitis (0.5% vs 0.5%; aRD, -0.04 per 100 individuals [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.09]; aRR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.70-1.21]), cesarean delivery (30.8% vs 32.2%; aRD, -2.73 per 100 individuals [95% CI, -3.59 to -1.88]; aRR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.89-0.95]), NICU admission (11.0% vs 13.3%; aRD, -1.89 per 100 newborns [95% CI, -2.49 to -1.30]; aRR, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.80-0.90]), or low Apgar score (1.8% vs 2.0%; aRD, -0.31 per 100 newborns [95% CI, -0.56 to -0.06]; aRR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.73-0.97]). Findings were qualitatively similar when compared with individuals who did not receive COVID-19 vaccination at any point (n = 30 115). Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study in Ontario, Canada, COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy, compared with vaccination after pregnancy and with no vaccination, was not significantly associated with increased risk of adverse peripartum outcomes. Study interpretation should consider that the vaccinations received during pregnancy were primarily mRNA vaccines administered in the second and third trimester.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Chorioamnionitis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Postpartum Hemorrhage , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chorioamnionitis/epidemiology , Chorioamnionitis/etiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Ontario/epidemiology , Peripartum Period , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic
5.
Matern Child Health J ; 26(1): 102-109, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611445

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may significantly affect the peripartum experience; however, little is known about the perceptions of women who gave birth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, the purpose of our study was to describe the peripartum experiences of women who gave birth during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, we collected survey data from a convenience sample of postpartum women recruited through social media. Participants were 18 years of age or older, lived in the United States, gave birth after February 1, 2020, and could read English. This study was part of the COVID-19 Maternal Attachment, Mood, Ability, and Support study, which was a larger study that collected survey data describing maternal mental health and breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper presents findings from the two free-text items describing peripartum experiences. Using the constant comparative method, responses were thematically analyzed to identify and collate major and minor themes. RESULTS: 371 participants responded to at least one free-text item. Five major themes emerged: (1) Heightened emotional distress; (2) Adverse breastfeeding experiences; (3) Unanticipated hospital policy changes shifted birthing plans; (4) Expectation vs. reality: "mourning what the experience should have been;" and (5) Surprising benefits of the COVID-19 pandemic to the delivery and postpartum experience. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: Peripartum women are vulnerable to heightened stress induced by COVID-19 pandemic sequalae. During public health crises, peripartum women may need additional resources and support to improve their mental health, wellbeing, and breastfeeding experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Grief , Humans , Pandemics , Peripartum Period , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
6.
Anaesthesiologie ; 71(6): 452-461, 2022 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the current pandemic regarding the infection with the SARS-CoV-2-virus and COVID-19 as the disease, concerns about pregnant women, effects on childbirth and the health of the newborn remain high. Initially, due to the early manifestation of the disease in younger patients, high numbers of COVID-19 patients in women needing peripartum care were expected. OBJECTIVE: This article aims to provide a general overview over the beginning of the pandemic as well as the second wave of infections in Germany and Switzerland, regarding SARS-CoV­2 positive pregnant women hospitalized for childbirth. We therefore launched a registry to gain timely information over the dynamic situation during the SARS-CoV­2 pandemic in Germany. MATERIAL AND METHODS: As part of the COVID-19-related Obstetric Anesthesia Longitudinal Assessment (COALA) registry, centers reported weekly birth rates, numbers of suspected SARS-CoV­2 cases, as well as the numbers of confirmed cases between 16 March and 3 May 2020. Data acquisition was continued from 18 October 2020 till 28 February 2021. The data were analyzed regarding distribution of SARS-CoV­2 positive pregnant women hospitalized for childbirth between centers, calendar weeks and birth rates as well as maternal characteristics, course of disease and outcomes of SARS-CoV­2 positive pregnant women. RESULTS: A total of 9 German centers reported 2270 deliveries over 7 weeks during the first wave of infections including 3 SARS-CoV­2 positive cases and 9 suspected cases. During the second survey period, 6 centers from Germany and Switzerland reported 41 positive cases out of 4897 deliveries. One woman presented with a severe and ultimately fatal course of the disease, while another one needed prolonged ECMO treatment. Of the women 28 presented with asymptomatic infections and 6 neonates were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit for further treatment. There was one case of neonatal SARS-CoV­2 infection. CONCLUSION: The number of pregnant women infected with SARS-CoV­2 was at a very low level at the time of delivery, with only sporadic suspected or confirmed cases. Due to the lack of comprehensive testing in the first survey period, however, a certain number of asymptomatic cases are to be assumed. Of the cases 68% presented as asymptomatic or as mild courses of disease but the data showed that even in young healthy patients without the presence of typical risk factors, serious progression can occur. These outcomes should raise awareness for anesthesiologists, obstetricians, pediatricians and intensive care physicians to identify severe cases of COVID-19 in pregnant women during childbirth and to take the necessary precautions to ensure the best treatment of mother and neonate. The prospective acquisition of data allowed a timely assessment of the highly dynamic situation and gain knowledge regarding this vulnerable group of patients.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Obstetrical , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Peripartum Period , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Arch Womens Ment Health ; 24(6): 941-947, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520362

ABSTRACT

Some women are vulnerable to developing new onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or having an exacerbation of pre-existing OCD during reproductive cycle events. Reports on the impact of the peripartum period on pre-existing OCD are inconsistent, with both worsening and improving symptom severity described. Studies have primarily been retrospective or have collected few data points, which limits the investigators' ability to capture the range of OCD symptoms during this time period, systematically and prospectively. The objective of this investigation was to add to the existing literature on the impact of the peripartum period on the course of pre-existing OCD. We conducted a secondary analysis of a subset data from the Brown Longitudinal Obsessive Compulsive Study, a prospective, observational study of OCD course. Nineteen women who experienced a pregnancy during the course of the study (9.5% of overall sample of women) were followed on average for 486 ± 133 weeks. Weekly psychiatric status ratings (PSRs) of OCD severity were compared between peripartum and non-peripartum periods. We found that the peripartum period did not significantly impact the course of OCD severity in the majority of women (N = 13, 69%). Of the minority of women with measurable variability in OCD symptoms, no statistically significant difference in PSR scores was observed between peripartum and non-peripartum periods. In this novel yet small dataset, the severity of OCD does not appear to worsen for most women during the peripartum period.


Subject(s)
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Peripartum Period , Female , Humans , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
9.
J Obstet Gynaecol ; 42(4): 707-709, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479853

ABSTRACT

As coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) sweeps all over the world, Information about COVID-19 is evolving rapidly and interim guidance by multiple organisations is constantly being updated and expanded. Early with discovery of COVID 19, it was reported that pregnancy did affect the progress of the disease severity. Recently, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that pregnancy is a risk factors for COVID-19 severity. The current case report is presenting a peripartum COVID-19 positive mortality case.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Obesity/complications , Peripartum Period , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(7)2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334540

ABSTRACT

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an uncommon heterogenous autosomal dominant multisystemic connective tissue disorder, which may potentially present with life-threatening emergencies. The prevalence of EDS of all subtypes is from 1 in 10 000 to 1 in 20 000. Pregnancy in women with type IV EDS poses significant challenges, necessitating the care of multidisciplinary team. Potential complications of type IV EDS include arterial dissection, arterial aneurysm, visceral rupture, excessive bleeding, tissue fragility and delayed wound healing. We present an interesting case of a pregnant woman with type IV EDS who had previous cerebrovascular complications and had a successful delivery in our tertiary centre following a collaborative approach to her care.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Dissecting , Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome , Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/complications , Female , Humans , Peripartum Period , Pregnancy
11.
Anaesthesist ; 70(9): 795-808, 2021 09.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283771

ABSTRACT

Peripartum emergencies that require intensive medical care represent a major challenge for the interdisciplinary treatment team. Due to physiological changes in pregnant women symptoms can be masked and the initiation of treatment is delayed. Peripartum sepsis has a relatively high incidence. The anti-infective treatment depends on the spectrum of pathogens to be expected. Endocrinological emergencies are rare but can be fulminant and fatal. The development of ketoacidosis is favored by decreased bicarbonate buffer and placental hormones. In the case of thyrotoxicosis, propylthiouracil and thiamazole are available for treatment depending on the stage of gestation. Sheehan's syndrome is an infarction of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland during a hemorrhage. Due to the loss of production of vital hormones, this can be fatal. The development of pulmonary edema is just as acute. This is favored by physiological changes during pregnancy. The differentiation between hypertensive and hypotensive pulmonary edema is important for the causal treatment.


Subject(s)
Pulmonary Edema , Sepsis , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Peripartum Period , Placenta , Pregnancy , Pulmonary Edema/therapy , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/therapy
12.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 47(1): 100888, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269259

ABSTRACT

Pregnancy with various physiological effects on cardiovascular system, makes mothers with borderline cardiovascular reserve at significant risk for adverse events during labor and early postpartum period. Cardiac imaging modalities, have shown that Coronavrus Disease 2019 disease is associated with subclinical myocardial injury in significant numbers of infected people, even in mild or asymptomatic disease and previous healthy ones. Herein, we have discussed the cardiovascular aspects of prepartum pregnant women with Coronavrus Disease 2019, especially patients with moderate to severe illness. Also, we have proposed how to handle the hemodynamic load during labor and the first 48 hours postpartum in the hypoxemic overloaded parturients with possible subclinical myocardial injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Peripartum Period , Female , Humans , Myocardium , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 62: 102736, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252401
14.
Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol ; 225(2): 183-187, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192802

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus that was first isolated in Wuhan, China, and resulted in a rapidly spreading pandemic worldwide. Currently there is only limited evidence on the effect of COVID-19 on pregnant women. CASE: Here we present one of the first serious COVID-19 cases in pregnancy at term with subsequent delivery. Postpartum the mother required antibiotic and symptomatic treatment. She experienced acute worsening of symptoms and developed acute respiratory failure requiring endotracheal intubation and subsequently extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 affects all medical disciplines, requiring interdisciplinary approaches and development of patient care regimes. Obstetricians should be aware and be prepared for the special needs of pregnant women with potential prenatal and postnatal issues. Ideally pregnant COVID-19 patients should be cared for at a tertiary perinatal center with experienced perinatologists and neonatologists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , China , Female , Humans , Peripartum Period , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand ; 100(7): 1219-1229, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039800

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Evidence on perinatal mental health during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its potential determinants is limited. Therefore, this multinational study aimed to assess the mental health status of pregnant and breastfeeding women during the pandemic, and to explore potential associations between depressive symptoms, anxiety, and stress and women's sociodemographic, health, and reproductive characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based study was performed in Ireland, Norway, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the UK between 16 June and 14 July 2020. Pregnant and breastfeeding women up to 3 months postpartum who were older than 18 years of age were eligible. The online, anonymous survey was promoted through social media and hospital websites. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder seven-item scale (GAD-7), and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) were used to assess mental health status. Regression model analysis was used to identify factors associated with poor mental health status. RESULTS: In total, 9041 women participated (including 3907 pregnant and 5134 breastfeeding women). The prevalence of major depressive symptoms (EDS ≥ 13) was 15% in the pregnancy cohort and and 13% the breastfeeding cohort. Moderate to severe generalized anxiety symptoms (GAD ≥ 10) were found among 11% and 10% of the pregnant and breastfeeding women. The mean (±SD) PSS scores for pregnant and breastfeeding women were 14.1 ± 6.6 and 13.7 ± 6.6, respectively. Risk factors associated with poor mental health included having a chronic mental illness, a chronic somatic illness in the postpartum period, smoking, having an unplanned pregnancy, professional status, and living in the UK or Ireland. CONCLUSIONS: This multinational study found high levels of depressive symptoms and generalized anxiety among pregnant and breastfeeding women during the COVID-19 outbreak. The study findings underline the importance of monitoring perinatal mental health during pandemics and other societal crises to safeguard maternal and infant mental health.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Breast Feeding , COVID-19 , Depression , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Breast Feeding/methods , Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Perinatal Care/methods , Perinatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Peripartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
17.
Echocardiography ; 37(10): 1673-1677, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-799148

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a healthy 35-year-old woman who had experienced a flu-like syndrome during the week before childbirth and heart failure symptoms 10 days before the current hospitalization and presented to our emergency department with clinical signs of congestive heart failure, echocardiographic evidence of a severely dilated and hypokinetic heart, laboratory evidence of SARS-CoV-2 disease, and radiologic findings consistent with both virus-related pneumonia and heart failure. Early cardiac magnetic resonance was crucial for the diagnosis of postpartum cardiomyopathy and for the exclusion of virus-related myocarditis, allowing us to decide on a prudent and supportive clinical approach.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiomyopathies/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Electrocardiography/methods , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Peripartum Period , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/diagnosis , Acute Disease , Adult , COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diagnosis, Differential , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/methods , Myocarditis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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