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1.
Virol J ; 18(1): 58, 2021 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140494

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: With the novel coronavirus pandemic, the impact on the healthcare system and workers cannot be overlooked. However, studies on the infection status of medical personnel are still lacking. It is imperative to ensure the safety of health-care workers (HCWs) not only to safeguard continuous patient care but also to ensure they do not transmit the virus, therefore evaluation of infection rates in these groups are indicated. METHODS: Demographic and clinical data regarding infected cases among HCWs of Fars, Iran with positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR tests were obtained from 10th March to 17th May 2020. RESULTS: Our data demonstrated a rate of 5.62% (273 out of 4854 cases) infection among HCW, with a mean age of 35 years and a dominance of female cases (146 cases: 53.5%). The majority of infected cases were among nurses (51.3%), while the most case infection rate (CIR) was among physicians (27 positive cases out of 842 performed test (3.2%)). Also, the highest rate of infection was in the emergency rooms (30.6%). Also, 35.5% of the patients were asymptomatic and the most frequent clinical features among symptomatic patients were myalgia (46%) and cough (45.5%). Although 5.5% were admitted to hospitals, there were no reports of ICU admission. Furthermore, 10.3% of the cases reported transmitting the infection to family and friends. Regarding safety precautions, 1.6% didn't wear masks and 18.7% didn't use gloves in work environments. CONCLUSION: HCWs are among the highest groups at risk of infection during the COVID-19 pandemic; therefore, evaluating infection rates and associated features is necessary to improve and adjust protective measures of these vulnerable, yet highly essential group.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , /transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
2.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(4): 946-950, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138823

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the post-lockdown challenges during Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic amongst the ophthalmologists in India. Methods: An online survey was sent to the practicing ophthalmologists across India. Data were collected from the responding ophthalmologists and analysed using Medcalc 16.4 software. Results: A total of 794 responses were obtained. Most respondents (51%) were in the age group 30-50 years and were in independent practice (40.05%). Almost three-fourth of ophthalmologists resumed their surgical services after a gap of more than a month post-lockdown. Almost a third of the respondents had significant reduction in their surgical workload during this period. Significant fear of contracting COVID-19 infection in the operation theatres was reported while moderate difficulty was found in procuring protective gear during immediate post-national lockdown period. Conclusion: The pandemic has changed the ophthalmic practice significantly, with patient and staff safety becoming areas of major concern. Both financial and psychological concerns affecting healthcare workers need addressing for continued patient care.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Care , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
AORN J ; 112(3): 217-224, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103269

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 first appeared in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and led to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which quickly spread globally. Protocols for surgical patients with COVID-19 were lacking, particularly for pregnant women undergoing cesarean deliveries. Perioperative nurses at Tongji Hospital in Wuhan retrospectively analyzed the perioperative nursing process, including OR preparation, intraoperative care, and OR cleanup, for women with COVID-19 undergoing cesarean deliveries. Preparation involved altering the layout of the surgical suite, educating staff members, providing personal protective equipment, and creating new in-house guidelines to help protect personnel and patients. This article describes how perioperative personnel strategized to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 in the OR and presents a multiple-case summary of six pregnant patients with COVID-19 who underwent cesarean deliveries at Tongji Hospital in January and February 2020.


Subject(s)
Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , China , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 128, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102336

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the disease caused by the novel coronavirus has spread globally, there has been significant economic instability in the healthcare systems. This reality was especially accentuated in Ecuador where, the shortage of healthcare workers combined with cultural and macroeconomic factors has led Ecuador to face the most aggressive outbreak in Latin America. In this context, the participation of final-year medical students on the front line is indispensable. Appropriate training on COVID-19 is an urgent requirement that universities and health systems must guarantee. We aimed to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Ecuadorian final-year medical students that could potentially guide the design of better medical education curricula regarding COVID-19. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional 33-item online survey conducted between April 6 to April 2020 assessing the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward the diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis toward COVID-19 in Ecuadorian final-year medical students. It was sent by email, Facebook, and WhatsApp. RESULTS: A total of 309 students responded to the survey. Out of which 88% of students scored high (≥ 70% correct) for knowledge of the disease. The majority of students were pessimistic about possible government actions, which is reflected in the negative attitude towards the control of COVID-19 and volunteering during the outbreak in Ecuador (77%, and 58% of the students, respectively). Moreover, 91% of students said they did not have adequate protective equipment. The latter finding was significantly associated with negative attitudes. CONCLUSIONS: Although a large number of students displayed negative attitudes, the non-depreciable percentage of students who were willing to volunteer and the coexisting high level of knowledge displayed by students, suggests that Ecuador has a capable upcoming workforce that could benefit from an opportunity to strengthen, improve and advance their training in preparation for COVID-19. Not having personal protective equipment was significantly associated to negative attitudes. Providing the necessary tools and creating a national curriculum may be one of the most effective ways to ensure all students are trained, whilst simultaneously focusing on the students' most pressing concerns. With this additional training, negative attitudes will improve and students will be better qualified.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , /therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ecuador/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Volunteers/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
6.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(3): 823-834, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100027

ABSTRACT

Healthcare personnel are recognized to be at higher risk for infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. We conducted a serologic survey in 15 hospitals and 56 nursing homes across Rhode Island, USA, during July 17-August 28, 2020. Overall seropositivity among 9,863 healthcare personnel was 4.6% (95% CI 4.2%-5.0%) but varied 4-fold between hospital personnel (3.1%, 95% CI 2.7%-3.5%) and nursing home personnel (13.1%, 95% CI 11.5%-14.9%). Within nursing homes, prevalence was highest among personnel working in coronavirus disease units (24.1%; 95% CI 20.6%-27.8%). Adjusted analysis showed that in hospitals, nurses and receptionists/medical assistants had a higher likelihood of seropositivity than physicians. In nursing homes, nursing assistants and social workers/case managers had higher likelihoods of seropositivity than occupational/physical/speech therapists. Nursing home personnel in all occupations had elevated seropositivity compared with hospital counterparts. Additional mitigation strategies are needed to protect nursing home personnel from infection, regardless of occupation.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , /transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Odds Ratio , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Rhode Island/epidemiology , /isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
7.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 54(1): 31-36, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1097322

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Non-traditional materials are used for mask construction to address personal protective equipment shortages during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Reusable masks made from surgical sterilization wrap represent such an innovative approach with social media frequently referring to them as "N95 alternatives." This material was tested for particle filtration efficiency and breathability to clarify what role they might have in infection prevention and control. METHODS: A heavyweight, double layer sterilization wrap was tested when new and after 2, 4, 6, and 10 autoclave sterilizing cycles and compared with an approved N95 respirator and a surgical mask via testing procedures using a sodium chloride aerosol for N95 efficiency testing similar to 42 CFR 84.181. Pressure testing to indicate breathability was also conducted. RESULTS: The particle filtration efficiency for the sterilization wrap ranged between 58% to 66%, with similar performance when new and after sterilizing cycles. The N95 respirator and surgical mask performed at 95% and 68% respectively. Pressure drops for the sterilization wrap, N95 and surgical mask were 10.4 mmH2O, 5.9 mmH2O, and 5.1 mmH2O, respectively, well below the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health limits of 35 mmH2O during initial inhalation and 25 mmH2O during initial exhalation. CONCLUSIONS: The sterilization wrap's particle filtration efficiency is much lower than a N95 respirator, but falls within the range of a surgical mask, with acceptable breathability. Performance testing of non-traditional mask materials is crucial to determine potential protection efficacy and for correcting misinterpretation propagated through popular media.


Subject(s)
Filtration/standards , Masks/standards , Filtration/instrumentation , Filtration/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Masks/microbiology , Masks/virology , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Sterilization/methods , Sterilization/standards , Sterilization/statistics & numerical data
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(7): 250-253, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089244

ABSTRACT

Certain hazard controls, including physical barriers, cloth face masks, and other personal protective equipment (PPE), are recommended to reduce coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) transmission in the workplace (1). Evaluation of occupational hazard control use for COVID-19 prevention can identify inadequately protected workers and opportunities to improve use. CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health used data from the June 2020 SummerStyles survey to characterize required and voluntary use of COVID-19-related occupational hazard controls among U.S. non-health care workers. A survey-weighted regression model was used to estimate the association between employer provision of hazard controls and voluntary use, and stratum-specific adjusted risk differences (aRDs) among workers reporting household incomes <250% and ≥250% of national poverty thresholds were estimated to assess effect modification by income. Approximately one half (45.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 41.0%-50.3%) of non-health care workers reported use of hazard controls in the workplace, 55.5% (95% CI = 48.8%-62.2%) of whom reported employer requirements to use them. After adjustment for occupational group and proximity to others at work, voluntary use was approximately double, or 22.3 absolute percentage points higher, among workers who were provided hazard controls than among those who were not. This effect was more apparent among lower-income (aRD = 31.0%) than among higher-income workers (aRD = 16.3%). Employers can help protect workers from COVID-19 by requiring and encouraging use of occupational hazard controls and providing hazard controls to employees (1).


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Mandatory Programs/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Voluntary Programs/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Architectural Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Workplace/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 23(2): 76-81, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presented a major medical management challenge to ophthalmology departments throughout Israel. OBJECTIVES: To examine the managerial challenges, actions taken, and insights of directors of ophthalmology departments in Israel during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional survey of directors of ophthalmology departments during the COVID-19 pandemic while the Israeli population was quarantined. RESULTS: All 21 directors answered the survey. The majority of the COVID-19 admissions were located in the center of Israel (53%) and Jerusalem (30%). E-communication took a central role in coping with the pandemic with 80% of the directors satisfied with this form of communication; 75% reported a reduction in clinical and surgery volume of at least 25%, and 40% reported reallocations of manpower. Most of the medical staff used gloves, a face shield, disposable robe, and a mask with no uniformity across departments. Cross satisfaction was noted regarding a hospital's ability to equip the departments. Lack of preparation for post-pandemic era was reported by all directors, but one (95%). Directors sought guidelines and uniformity regarding outpatient referral to the hospital (p = 0.035). CONCLUSIONS: Guidelines via safe digital platforms aid in management decisions and uniformity across departments. Advanced preparation is needed to prevent adverse clinical outcomes and to maintain treatment continuum. Our results can be used to guide and help improve the preparedness of ophthalmology departments during COVID-19 and for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disposable Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Gloves, Protective/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Departments/standards , Humans , Israel , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Quarantine , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) ; 29(1): 2309499020988176, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079201

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In this study we investigated on the personal protective equipment (PPE) usage, recycling, and disposal among spine surgeons in the Asia Pacific region. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among spine surgeons in Asia Pacific. The questionnaires were focused on the usage, recycling and disposal of PPE. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-two surgeons from 19 countries participated in the survey. When we sub-analysed the differences between countries, the provision of adequate PPE by hospitals ranged from 37.5% to 100%. The usage of PPE was generally high. The most used PPE were surgical face masks (88.7%), followed by surgical caps (88.3%), gowns (85.6%), sterile gloves (83.3%) and face shields (82.0%). The least used PPE were powered air-purifying respirators (PAPR) (23.0%) and shoes/boots (45.0%). The commonly used PPE for surgeries involving COVID-19 positive patients were N95 masks (74.8%), sterile gloves (73.0%), gowns (72.1%), surgical caps (71.6%), face shields (64.4%), goggles (64.0%), shoe covers (58.6%), plastic aprons (45.9%), shoes/boots (45.9%), surgical face masks (36.5%) and PAPRs (21.2%). Most PPE were not recycled. Biohazard bins were the preferred method of disposal for all types of PPE items compared to general waste. CONCLUSIONS: The usage of PPE was generally high among most countries especially for surgeries involving COVID-19 positive patients except for Myanmar and Nepal. Overall, the most used PPE were surgical face masks. For surgeries involving COVID-19 positive patients, the most used PPE were N95 masks. Most PPE were not recycled. Biohazard bins were the preferred method of disposal for all types of PPE.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Orthopedics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Societies, Medical , Spinal Diseases/surgery , Asia , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Spinal Diseases/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 136-143, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068133

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: to describe the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic with a focus on undetected cases and to evaluate different post-lockdown scenarios. DESIGN: the study introduces a SEIR compartmental model, taking into account the region-specific fraction of undetected cases, the effects of mobility restrictions, and the personal protective measures adopted, such as wearing a mask and washing hands frequently. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: the model is experimentally validated with data of all the Italian regions, some European countries, and the US. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: the accuracy of the model results is measured through the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and Lewis criteria; fitting parameters are in good agreement with previous literature. RESULTS: the epidemic curves for different countries and the amount of undetected and asymptomatic cases are estimated, which are likely to represent the main source of infections in the near future. The model is applied to the Hubei case study, which is the first place to relax mobility restrictions. Results show different possible scenarios. Mobility and the adoption of personal protective measures greatly influence the dynamics of the infection, determining either a huge and rapid secondary epidemic peak or a more delayed and manageable one. CONCLUSIONS: mathematical models can provide useful insights for healthcare decision makers to determine the best strategy in case of future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , /prevention & control , Convalescence , Disease Susceptibility , Environmental Exposure , Europe/epidemiology , Geography, Medical , Hand Hygiene/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
12.
Front Public Health ; 8: 606635, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058475

ABSTRACT

Wearing face masks is recommended as part of personal protective equipment and as a public health measure to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Their use, however, is deeply connected to social and cultural practices and has acquired a variety of personal and social meanings. This article aims to identify the diversity of sociocultural, ethical, and political meanings attributed to face masks, how they might impact public health policies, and how they should be considered in health communication. In May 2020, we involved 29 experts of an interdisciplinary research network on health and society to provide their testimonies on the use of face masks in 20 European and 2 Asian countries (China and South Korea). They reflected on regulations in the corresponding jurisdictions as well as the personal and social aspects of face mask wearing. We analyzed those testimonies thematically, employing the method of qualitative descriptive analysis. The analysis framed the four dimensions of the societal and personal practices of wearing (or not wearing) face masks: individual perceptions of infection risk, personal interpretations of responsibility and solidarity, cultural traditions and religious imprinting, and the need of expressing self-identity. Our study points to the importance for an in-depth understanding of the cultural and sociopolitical considerations around the personal and social meaning of mask wearing in different contexts as a necessary prerequisite for the assessment of the effectiveness of face masks as a public health measure. Improving the personal and collective understanding of citizens' behaviors and attitudes appears essential for designing more effective health communications about COVID-19 pandemic or other global crises in the future.    To wear a face mask or not to wear a face mask?    Nowadays, this question has been analogous    to the famous line from Shakespeare's Hamlet:    "To be or not to be, that is the question."    This is a bit allegorical,    but certainly not far from the current circumstances    where a deadly virus is spreading amongst us... Vanja Kopilas, Croatia.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Public Opinion , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude to Health , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
13.
AANA J ; 89(1): 71-75, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049350

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created many changes and difficulties in healthcare, and the anesthesia specialty is no exception. Both the increased need for personal protective equipment (PPE) and the potential for infection and contamination through respiratory droplets have been sources of much concern. Policies and protocols have been adapted worldwide to help neutralize infection risk and exposure. Transmission of the virus to healthcare workers has been a major concern, and the risk of infection is exceptionally high for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) because of their close contact with infected patients. CRNAs are in a unique position to help decrease exposure for themselves and other members of the healthcare team by taking extra precautions during airway manipulation. A great deal of focus has been placed on reducing risks during intubation, but reports describing methods of reducing contamination and exposure to respiratory droplets during emergence and extubation are scarce. The authors have reviewed techniques to reduce coughing, thereby decreasing the potential of virus exposure through contact with large respiratory droplets and aerosolized particles that may remain suspended in air.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Health Personnel/psychology , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Operating Rooms/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Attitude of Health Personnel , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data
16.
Am J Nurs ; 121(2): 40-45, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038299

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The authors describe the personal protective equipment (PPE) clinicians require when involved in the care of patients with potential or confirmed exposure to highly infectious pathogens, such as the Ebola virus, multidrug-resistant organisms, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, the cause of COVID-19. They discuss the communication challenges that arise with the various PPE required when caring for patients in high-containment clinical environments and how they and their colleagues in the National Institutes of Health's Special Clinical Studies Unit developed, field-tested, refined, and ultimately implemented policies and procedures that enabled clinicians to communicate effectively with other staff, patients, and external partners, such as governmental agencies, other specialized units, and nonprofit organizations.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Interprofessional Relations , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , /prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans
17.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am ; 53(6): 1159-1170, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027957

ABSTRACT

This review explores the changes to practice associated with COVID-19 for providers treating patients with head and neck cancer and laryngeal pathology. The aim of the review is to highlight some of the challenges and considerations associated with treating this patient population during the pandemic. Additionally, it seeks to discuss some of the areas of concern related to ramping up clinical volume.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Infection Control/methods , Laryngectomy/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Laryngectomy/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Safety Management , Telemedicine/methods , United States
18.
Nurs Health Sci ; 23(1): 245-254, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027065

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study of healthcare workers who cared for COVID-19 patients was to identify factors that affected the duration of wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). The results of this study will provide initial guidance to practicing clinicians and a foundation for further research on this topic. This cross-sectional study examined 139 frontline healthcare professionals who worked at a single hospital in Wuhan, China, from March 16 to April 1, 2020. General and demographic data, physical and mental status, use of personal protective equipment, type of hospital work, and duration of wearing personal protective equipment were recorded. The mean duration of wearing personal protective equipment was 194.17 min (standard deviation: 3.71). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the duration of wearing personal protective equipment was significantly associated with the presence of a chronic disease, working hours when feeling discomfort, lack of patient cooperation and subsequent psychological pressure, prolonged continuous wearing of personal protective equipment, feeling anxious about physical strength, and the presence of fatigue when wearing personal protective equipment. These factors should be considered by practicing healthcare professionals and in future studies that examine the optimal duration of wearing personal protective equipment.


Subject(s)
/therapy , Disposable Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Epidemiologic Studies , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/classification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
19.
Int Nurs Rev ; 67(4): 437-444, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1020634

ABSTRACT

The United States leads the world in COVID-19 cases and deaths. The government's poorly coordinated response has lacked national mandates, failed to deploy adequate personal protective equipment, supplies and testing and devalued advice of science experts. COVID-19 exposed racial disparities in health care and as protests against racial injustice erupted, nurses have responded to the call to confront racism as a public health crisis. Nurses also suffer from lack of personal protective equipment, burnout, extreme workloads, overwhelming deaths and fear of contracting COVID-19. While facing danger, nurses have implemented practice changes and fostered new roles and teamwork to provide safer care. Advancing policy to provide personal protective equipment as well as financial and mental health support for nurses is a priority nationally and globally.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , /nursing , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Nurse's Role , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , United States , Workload/psychology
20.
Curr Oncol ; 28(1): 233-251, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011430

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has spread rapidly, requiring health delivery systems to undertake dramatic transformations. To evaluate these system changes, we undertook one of the first Canadian health delivery system reviews and the first Canadian cancer centre evaluation of pandemic system modifications. METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed to the Canadian Association of Provincial Cancer Agencies (CAPCA) members in order to assess changes to cancer centre services and patient management. Documentation relating to COVID-19 from the CAPCA electronic space was accessed, and all publicly available cancer centre documentation related to COVID-19 was reviewed. RESULTS: Seven provinces completed the questionnaire and had documentation available from the CAPCA electronic space. All screening programs across Canada were suspended. In most provinces surveyed, ≥50% of outpatient appointments were occurring virtually, with <25% using video platforms. Generally, the impact on diagnostic imaging and new patient referrals correlated with the impact of COVID-19. Most provinces had a reduction in operating room availability, with chemotherapy and radiation treatments continuing. Public health modification, including personal protective equipment and screening staff, varied across the country. CONCLUSION: Canadian cancer centres underwent a rapid and aggressive transformation of services in response to COVID-19, with many similarities and differences across provinces. In part, this response was facilitated by communication under a national association, which in Canada remains unique to cancer. This response may serve to inform changes in other jurisdictions or disease states now and in future waves of the pandemic, as well as a record of changes for future health services and patient outcome research.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , /epidemiology , Canada , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/methods , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , /physiology
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