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3.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(9): 1003-1010, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 has been implicated in the largest recorded coronavirus outbreak to date. Initially, most COVID-19 cases were in China, but the virus has spread to more than 184 countries worldwide, and the United States currently has more cases than any other country. OBJECTIVE: With person-to-person spread expanding in the United States, we describe hospital preparedness for managing suspected and confirmed COVID-19 patients. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey focused on various elements of respiratory disease preparedness. SETTING: Critical access hospitals (CAHs) and acute-care hospitals (ACHs) in Idaho. METHODS: The electronic survey was sent to infection preventionists (IPs) and nurse administrators in 44 hospitals in Idaho. RESULTS: Overall, 32 (73%) hospitals responded to the survey. Participating facilities reported their preparedness with respect to existing, formalized structures for managing infectious disease incidents-specifically COVID-19-as well as availability of resources, such as isolation rooms and personal protective equipment, for safely managing suspected and confirmed COVID-19 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitals covered by the survey had varying levels of preparedness for managing COVID-19 cases, with differences across the various categories of interest in this study. Although the study reveals strengths, including in application of emergency management and infection control frameworks, it also suggests that other areas, such as consistent implementation of federal guidelines and requirements for infection prevention, are potential areas for strengthening preparedness for SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory pathogens with pandemic potential.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Idaho , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725600

ABSTRACT

The number of COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease of 2019) cases in Jordan is rising rapidly. A serious threat to the healthcare system appears on the horizon. Our study aims to evaluate preparedness of Jordanian frontline doctors to the worsening scenario. It has a questionnaire-based cross-sectional structure. The questionnaire was designed to evaluate preparedness according to knowledge about virus transmission and protective measures, adherence to protection guidelines, and psychological impacts affecting doctors. Institutional factors affecting doctors' readiness like adopting approach protocols and making protection equipment available were investigated; 308 doctors from different healthcare facilities participated (response rate: 53.9%). Approximately 25% of doctors (n = 77) previously took care of COVID-19 patients, and 173 (56.2%) have institutional COVID-19 approach protocols. Only 57 doctors (18.5%) reported all PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) available. The self-reported score of preparedness to deal with COVID-19 patients was 4.9 ± 2.4. Doctors having institutional protocols for dealing with COVID-19 cases and those with sustained availability of PPE reported higher scores of preparedness (5.5 ± 2.3 and 6.2 ± 2.1 with p < 0.001, respectively). Correlations with knowledge score, adherence to PPE score, and psychological impacts were investigated. The study revealed multiple challenges and insufficiencies that can affect frontline doctors' preparedness. Policy makers are urged to take these findings into consideration and to act promptly.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1663-1670, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684831

ABSTRACT

At the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many medical students were removed from clinical duties and had their education put on hold. Some found novel ways to join efforts to respond to the pandemic. Georgetown University School of Medicine medical students created Medical Supply Drive (MSD or MedSupplyDrive), a 501(c)(3), on March 17, 2020, in response to the national shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). This article reviews the formation of a national response to the pandemic, the methods employed to distribute PPE, and the results of MSD's work from March 17, 2020, through June 20, 2020. A focus was placed on equitable distribution, both within local regions and on the national scale, by distinguishing COVID-19 hotspots, including Native American reservations. As of June 20, 2020, over half a million items were donated, with 1,001 deliveries made to 423 hospitals, 182 clinics, 175 long-term care facilities, 25 homeless shelters, 32 public health departments, and 164 other facilities. From 46 states and the District of Columbia, 1,514 individuals volunteered, and 202 signed up as regional coordinators. MSD formed 2 international organizations, MedSupplyDrive UK and MedSupplyDrive Scotland, and established U.S.-based partnerships with 19 different PPE and aid organizations. MSD gained local, national, and international media attention with over 45 interviews conducted about the organization. While the pandemic temporarily disrupted formal medical education, MSD empowered medical students to actively learn about the needs of their communities and organize ways to address them while incorporating these values into their professional identities. The framework that this organization employed also provides a potential model for future disaster relief efforts in times of crisis. MSD hopes to motivate budding physicians to collaborate and play an active role in tackling public health inequities beyond hospitals and within the communities students will one day serve.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical/methods , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Students, Medical , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(12): 1808-1812, 2021 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639503

ABSTRACT

Beginning in 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) rapidly resulted in a worldwide pandemic. Many patients with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) require invasive ventilation due to severe respiratory failure. However, many medical hospitals experienced shortages of personal protective equipment, increasing the risk of healthcare workers contracting an infection. However, we report a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome during the early stage of COVID-19 treated at a university hospital outside of Wuhan, China. We described the optimization of healthcare worker personal protection and a procedure for airway management in the context of insufficient personal protective equipment. This report may provide a reference for resource-limited settings in low- and middle-income countries, even countries where healthcare systems have been overwhelmed by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 36-43, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625512

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has created unique challenges for health care workers, who have demonstrated dedication, collaboration, and innovation in response. In this article, the authors describe an important nursing innovation they employed at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, during the spring 2020 COVID-19 surge: the relocation of smart IV infusion pumps outside of patient rooms. The goals of this innovation were to improve delivery of care, conserve personal protective equipment, limit the spread of the virus, and protect staff from exposure. The authors discuss the initial concerns that arose regarding the safety and efficacy of this practice; the research they conducted with other colleagues in nursing, pharmacy, infection control, and patient safety in the face of scant clinical literature relevant to the difficult circumstances the pandemic created; and the strategies they ultimately employed to ensure that this practice maintained safety and efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infusion Pumps , Patient Isolation/methods , Patients' Rooms/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Public Health Rep ; 137(2): 208-212, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582750

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created unprecedented strain on the personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chain. Given the dearth of PPE and consequences for transmission, GetMePPE Chicago (GMPC) developed a PPE allocation framework and system, distributing 886 900 units to 274 institutions from March 2020 to July 2021 to address PPE needs. As the pandemic evolved, GMPC made difficult decisions about (1) building reserve inventory (to balance present and future, potentially higher clinical acuity, needs), (2) donating to other states/out-of-state organizations, and (3) receiving donations from other states. In this case study, we detail both GMPC's experience in making these decisions and the ethical frameworks that guided these decisions. We also reflect on lessons learned and suggest which values may have been in conflict (eg, maximizing benefits vs duty to mission, defined in the context of PPE allocation) in each circumstance, which values were prioritized, and when that prioritization would change. Such guidance can promote a values-based approach to key issues concerning distribution of PPE and other scarce medical resources in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and related future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organizational Case Studies , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Resource Allocation/ethics , Chicago , Decision Making, Organizational , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Volunteers
15.
Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 15(12): 1349-1359, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532355

ABSTRACT

Endoscopists are at high risk of exposure and nosocomial transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 virus) when performing endoscopic procedures due to the highly aerosol generating nature of these procedures. At present, there is still no consensus among endoscopists with regards to the type of protective equipment to be worn by healthcare workers, when performing endoscopy during the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This review encompasses a summary of currently published guidelines related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when performing endoscopic procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic. With increasing calls to rationalize the use of PPE due to shortages in global supply chains, the review offers a concise summary on the most appropriate and adequate use of PPE when performing endoscopy during the pandemic. It is expected that these adaptations in the use of PPE during the pandemic will help to improve standards of care and safety of healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 159, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the COVID-19 pandemic context, a massive shortage of personal protective equipment occurred. To increase the available stocks, several countries appealed for donations from individuals or industries. While national and international standards to evaluate personal protective equipment exist, none of the previous research studied how to evaluate personal protective equipment coming from donations to healthcare establishments. Our aim was to evaluate the quality and possible use of the personal protective equipment donations delivered to our health care establishment in order to avoid a shortage and to protect health care workers throughout the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: Our intervention focused on evaluation of the quality of donations for medical use through creation of a set of assessment criteria and analysis of the economic impact of these donations. RESULTS: Between 20th March 2020 and 11th May 2020, we received 239 donations including respirators, gloves, coveralls, face masks, gowns, hats, overshoes, alcohol-based hand rubs, face shields, goggles and aprons. A total of 448,666 (86.3%) products out of the 519,618 initially received were validated and distributed in health care units, equivalent to 126 (52.7%) donations out of the 239 received. The budgetary value of the validated donations was 32,872 euros according to the pre COVID-19 prices and 122,178 euros according to the current COVID-19 prices, representing an increase of 371.7%. CONCLUSIONS: By ensuring a constant influx of personal protective equipment and proper stock management, shortages were avoided. Procurement and distribution of controlled and validated personal protective equipment is the key to providing quality care while guaranteeing health care worker safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Eye Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Health Personnel/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Masks/supply & distribution , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Protective Clothing/supply & distribution , Safety Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Protective Clothing/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Nurs Outlook ; 70(1): 137-144, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has required nursing innovations to meet patient care needs not previously encountered. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe nursing innovations conceived, implemented, and desired during the first COVID-19 surge. METHODS: The investigators invited registered nurses employed across 16 Midwest hospitals (6,207) to complete the survey. Respondents provided demographics and written descriptions of innovations they conceived, witnessed, and desired. Investigators analyzed text responses using standard content analytic procedures and summarized quantitative demographics using percentages. FINDINGS: Nurses reported seven types of innovations that would (a) improve personal protective equipment (PPE), (b) limit the need to repeatedly don and doff PPE, (c) ensure safer practice, (d) conserve and access supplies, (e) provide patient and family education and support, (f) make team member communication more efficient, and (g) improve peer support. DISCUSSION: Nurses are in a unique position to generate innovative solutions to meet patient care needs under adverse and rapidly changing situations.


Subject(s)
Communication , Diffusion of Innovation , Occupational Health , Patient Care/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Universities , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Indiana , Male , Patient Education as Topic , Surveys and Questionnaires
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