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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239858

ABSTRACT

The present study investigated how altered daily life behavior and its self-evaluation associated with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic relate to psychological health in Japanese working adults, and how such relationships may be moderated by dispositional mindfulness. A total of 1000 participants completed an online survey comprising questions on how they used time and self-evaluated life behavior before and during the pandemic, as well as scales on mindfulness and psychological health. The results revealed that after the pandemic, participants spent significantly more time at home and using a PC/smartphone. They were also more likely to perceive frequent exposure to COVID-19-related media reports and less likely to find their work going well. Many of these variables were significantly correlated with lower psychological health. Moreover, hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed the moderating effects of mindfulness, such that the perceived frequency of exposure to pandemic-related media reports and poorer views that work was going well were less likely to predict lower psychological health when mindfulness was high. These findings suggest that altered daily life behavior and its self-evaluation after the pandemic are associated with deteriorated psychological health, but that mindfulness can serve as a protective factor against psychological distress among Japanese workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Mindfulness , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , East Asian People , Mindfulness/methods , Pandemics , Personality
2.
J Psychol ; 157(5): 297-317, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242234

ABSTRACT

This study examined the role of the Big Five personality traits and risk perception profiles among a sample of corporate managers concerning their subjective wellbeing (SWB) and corporate management practices during the Covid-19 pandemic. Two hundred and fifty-five chief executive officers (CEOs) and chief financial officers (CFOs) of companies listed on the main market of the Warsaw Stock Exchange (WSE) in Poland participated in the study by completing the Satisfaction with Life Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Scale, Ten-Item Personality Inventory, Stimulation-Instrumental Risk Inventory, and a business survey on the Covid-19 pandemic's impact on company management. Latent profile analysis revealed the existence of diverse profiles among the participants regarding personality traits and risk perception, which were variously related to their SWB and managerial practices during the pandemic. It seems that individual differences in personality traits and risk perception not only matter for the individual life satisfaction of managers but may also translate into effective company management in times of crisis. The results of our study may be an adjunct to understanding underlying sources of managerial biases in corporate management as well as to developing more effective methods of psychological counseling of corporate managers, a topic that remains still a highly understudied research area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Personality , Personality Inventory , Perception
3.
J Water Health ; 21(6): 763-770, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328286

ABSTRACT

Many previous studies have already pointed out that health concerns influence people's choice of drinking water. The health concerns discussed in the preceding studies are those that are associated with the choice of a particular type of water. On the other hand, people also experience health concerns in their daily lives, unrelated to the choice of drinking water. These two need to be discussed separately, but preceding studies have failed to make a distinction. In this study, we refer to the former as 'health concerns attributable to water characteristics' and the latter as 'health concerns stemming from personality traits.' The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship, if any, between people's health concerns stemming from personality traits and their choice of drinking water. We use three types of health concerns that are stemming from personality traits (e.g. health maintenance, pesticide residues in food, and COVID-19 infection) to elucidate their influences on the choice of drinking water. Based on the results of the analysis, this study reveals that the influence of health concerns stemming from personality traits on the choice of drinking water differs depending on its typology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drinking Water , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Tokyo/epidemiology , Personality
4.
Scand J Caring Sci ; 37(2): 350-363, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322670

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this study, we investigate how socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender and education) and informal care relationship characteristics (e.g., time spent on care, number of informal caregivers, professional care) are linked with informal care burden during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, we expect this burden to differ by personality characteristics, degree of resilience, and-in this specific context-perceived the COVID-19 threat. METHOD: We used the fifth wave of a longitudinal study to identify 258 informal caregivers. These online survey data came from a five-wave longitudinal study in Flanders, Belgium that ran from April 2020 to April 2021. Data were representative of the adult population by age and gender. Analyses include t-tests, ANOVA, SEM and binomial logistic regression. RESULTS: We found that the informal care burden was strongly linked with a socio-economic gradient, time investment changes in care since the start of the pandemic, and whether there was more than one informal caregiver. Personality traits such as agreeableness and openness to experience, and the perceived threat of COVID-19 were also related to care burden. CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, informal caregivers were put under extra considerable pressure: restrictive government measures sometimes led to the temporary suspension of some or all professional care for persons with care needs, which may have resulted in a growing psychosocial burden. We recommend that, in the future, the focus should be on supporting the mental wellbeing and social participation of caregivers along with measures to protect caregivers and their relatives from COVID-19. Support structures for informal caregivers should be kept running during crises now and in the future, but it is also important to adopt a case-by-case basis to consider support for informal caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Humans , Caregiver Burden , Belgium/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Care , Caregivers/psychology , Personality
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(9)2023 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316689

ABSTRACT

Marketing unhealthy products by multinational corporations has caused considerable harm to individual health, collective wellbeing, and environmental sustainability. This is a growing threat to all societies and a significant contributor to the rising global burden of non-communicable diseases and early mortality. While there is growing consideration of the commercial determinants of health, this is largely focused on the methods by which unhealthy products are marketed and disseminated, including efforts to manipulate policy. Little attention has been paid to the underlying psychological traits and worldviews that are driving corporate greed. Here, we consider the role of "dispositional greed" in the commercial determinants of health with a focus on the historical attitudes and culture in the ultra-processed food industry-exemplified by "The Founder" of the McDonald's franchise. We argue that greed and associated psychological constructs, such as social dominance orientation and collective narcissism, permeate the commercial determinants of health at a collective level. This includes how a culture of greed within organizations, and individual dispositional greed, can magnify and cluster at scale, perpetuated by social dominance orientation. We also consider the ways in which "showbiz" marketing specifically targets marginalized populations and vulnerable groups, including children-in ways that are justified, or even celebrated despite clear links to non-communicable diseases and increased mortality. Finally, we consider how greed and exploitative mindsets mirror cultural values and priorities, with trends for increasing collective narcissism at scale, recognizing that many of these attitudes are cultivated in early life. A healthier future will depend on navigating a path that balances material prosperity with physical and spiritual wellbeing. This will require cultural change that places higher value on kindness, reciprocity, and mutualistic values especially in early life, for more equitable flourishing.


Subject(s)
Noncommunicable Diseases , Child , Humans , Personality , Social Dominance , Policy , Health Status
6.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7102, 2023 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318395

ABSTRACT

While recent neurocognitive theories have proposed links between dreams and waking life, it remains unclear what kinds of waking thoughts are most similar in their phenomenological characteristics to those of dreams. To investigate this question and examine relevance of dreams to significant personal concerns and dispositional mental health traits, we employed ecological momentary assessment and trait questionnaires across 719 young adults who completed the study during the COVID-19 pandemic, a time marked by considerable societal concern. Across the group and at the level of individual differences, dreams showed the highest correspondence with task-unrelated thoughts. Participants who self-reported greater COVID-19 concern rated their dreams as more negative and unconstructive, a relationship which was moderated by trait rumination. Furthermore, dreams perceived as more negative unconstructive and immersive in nature associated with increased trait rumination beyond variation in rumination explained by waking task-unrelated thoughts alone. Together, these results point to similarities between perceived characteristics of dreams and task-unrelated thoughts, and support a relationship between dreams, current concerns, and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dreams , Young Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Personality , Mental Health
7.
Int J Psychoanal ; 104(2): 263-280, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318369

ABSTRACT

The author describes the evolution of the psychotherapy of a psychotic adolescent in the period when the pandemic induced their national authorities to impose lockdown. The difficulty of coming to terms with an ever-present reality that proved to be distressing for both the patient and the analyst, as well as with the violence and rapidity with which the external situation developed, leading to a change in the therapy setting, are at the heart of the reflections in this paper. The "choice" of whether to continue the sessions over the phone determined the emergence of some distinctive issues related to discontinuity and to the impossibility of relying on visual perception. However, to the analyst's surprise, it also favoured the possibility of working through the meaning of some autistic mental areas which, up to that moment, had never really been accessible to verbalization. Questioning the meaning of these changes, the author develops a broader reflection about the way that, for analysts and patients, modifications in the frames of our daily lives and clinical practice have enabled the deployment of undifferentiated parts of the personality which had previously been secretly deposited in the "body" of the setting and therefore were inaccessible.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Psychoanalytic Therapy , Humans , Adolescent , Personality , Countertransference , Violence , Professional-Patient Relations
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(7)2023 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2290952

ABSTRACT

The switching from traditional to online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic was challenging for students, determining an increase in physical and mental health problems. The current paper applied a two-step cluster analysis in a large sample of n = 1028 university students (Mage = 21.10 years, SD = 2.45 years; range: 18-30 years; 78.4% females). Participants responded to an online survey exploring neuroticism, trait/state anxiety, general self-efficacy, academic motivation, fear of COVID-19, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical and mental health, and the help requests. Results showed two significant clusters of students having a Maladaptive Academic Profile (n = 456; 44.4%) or an Adaptive Academic Profile (n = 572; 55.6%). Significant differences were found between the two clusters, where students belonging to the Maladaptive Academic Profile reported higher levels of neuroticism, higher dispositional and situational anxiety, and fear of COVID-19, and lower self-efficacy and academic motivation than students of the Adaptive Academic Profile cluster. In addition, more physical or mental health problems and help requests, mainly to partners during the COVID-19 pandemic, were found in the Maladaptive Academic Profile cluster compared to the Adaptive Academic Profile. Finally, the practical implications of the study's results in implementing university counseling services as protective measures to contrast psychological distress in the long-term COVID-19 pandemic are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Universities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Personality , Students
9.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 4254, 2023 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278975

ABSTRACT

A substantial number of people refused to get vaccinated against COVID-19, which prompts the question as to why. We focus on the role of individual worldviews about the nature and generation of knowledge (epistemic beliefs). We propose a model that includes epistemic beliefs, their relationship to the Dark Factor of Personality (D), and their mutual effect on the probability of having been vaccinated against COVID-19. Based on a US nationally representative sample (N = 1268), we show that stronger endorsement of post-truth epistemic beliefs was associated with a lower probability of having been vaccinated against COVID-19. D was also linked to a lower probability of having been vaccinated against COVID-19, which can be explained by post-truth epistemic beliefs. Our results indicate that the more individuals deliberately refrain from adhering to the better argument, the less likely they are vaccinated. More generally, post-truth epistemic beliefs pose a challenge for rational communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personality Disorders , Vaccination Refusal , Personality , Vaccination
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278642

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, has forced all countries affected by it to introduce quarantine and isolation to prevent the spread of the virus, as well as masking and distancing. Not everyone is equally willing to follow the rules related to limit the extent of the coronavirus epidemic. This might be connected with personality traits, especially openness, positive attitude, and optimism. Materials and Methods: An online survey was created and completed by participants in April-May 2020. Self-assessment of personality traits and adherence to lockdown recommendations were assessed. A total of 7404 participants took part in the study, mainly from Poland (83.6%) and Italy (12.7%). Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed. Results: The participants were divided into groups depending on the degree of compliance with the lockdown rules. In the multivariate analysis, variables that increased the odds for stricter lockdown compliance were temporary work suspension OR 1.27 (95% CI 1.10-1.48), income level "we can't handle this situation" OR 1.67 (95%CI 1.20-2.33), and junior high school education OR 1.68 (95% CI 1.13-2.50). Other significant factors included age and place of residence. Each point of self-assessed sociability OR 1.07 (95% CI 1.00-1.13) also increased the likelihood of adhering to lockdown rules. Conclusions: Taking the basic demographic characteristics as well as working and health environment conditions traits into account may be helpful when forecasting epidemiological compliance during a pandemic, as well as in other public health tasks. The key role of self-assessed personality traits was not confirmed in this study. Reliability of the results is limited by significant disproportions in the size of the study groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reproducibility of Results , Communicable Disease Control , Quarantine , Personality
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2259824

ABSTRACT

A proper diet increases the effectiveness of training and accelerates post-workout regeneration. One of the factors determining eating behaviour are personality traits, including those included in the Big Five model, i.e., neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. The aim of this study was to analyse the personality determinants of peri-exercise nutritional behaviours among an elite group of Polish athletes practicing team sports. The study was conducted in a group of 213 athletes, using the author's validated questionnaire of exercise-related nutrition behaviours and the NEO-PI-R (Neuroticism Extraversion Openness-Personality Inventory-Revised). A statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's linear correlation and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients as well as a multiple regression analysis, assuming a significance level of α = 0.05. It has been shown that the level of the overall index regarding normal peri-exercise eating behaviours decreased with increasing neuroticism (r = -0.18) and agreeableness (r = -0.18). An analysis of the relationship between the personality traits (sub-scales) of the Big Five model demonstrated that the overall index of proper peri-exercise nutrition decreased with the intensification of three neuroticism traits, i.e., hostility/anger (R = -0.20), impulsiveness/immoderation (R = -0.18), and vulnerability to stress/learned helplessness (R = -0.19), and four traits of agreeableness, i.e., straightforwardness/morality (R = -0.17), compliance/cooperation (R = -0.19), modesty (R = -0.14), and tendermindedness/sympathy (R = -0.15) (p < 0.05). A multiple regression analysis exhibited that the full model consisting of all the analysed personality traits explained 99% of the variance concerning the level of the proper peri-exercise nutrition index. In conclusion, the index of proper nutrition under conditions of physical effort decreases along with the intensification of neuroticism and agreeableness among Polish athletes professionally practicing team sports.


Subject(s)
Personality , Team Sports , Humans , Poland , Personality Disorders , Personality Inventory , Athletes
12.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand ; 102(3): 270-281, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252280

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The burden of perinatal mental health problems was expected to increase during the COVID-19 pandemic. We prospectively investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of pregnant and postpartum women in Norway and explored associations with their sociodemographic characteristics and personality traits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sociodemographic information and the self-reported impact of pandemic on wellbeing of pregnant women was collected using an online survey. To assess women's mental health, two validated questionnaires, the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 item Scale (GAD-7), were used prenatally and postnatally. Personality traits were evaluated using HumanGuide, a web-based ipsative psychological evaluation instrument. RESULTS: 772 women were included prenatally, of which 526 also responded to the survey 4-6 weeks postnatally. The median age was 29 years, 53.6% of the women were nulliparous when enrolled, and 35.1% worked in the healthcare sector. The median EPDS (6.0; interquartile range [IQR] 3.0-10.0 vs 6.0; IQR: 3.0-10.0) and the median GAD-7 (5.0; IQR 2.0-9.0 vs 5.0; IQR 2.0-9.0) were similar pre-and postnatally. Prenatally, the proportion of women scoring ≥13 on EPDS and ≥10 on GAD-7 was 14.5% (112/772) and 21.5% (166/772), whereas the postnatal figures were 15.6% (82/526) and 21.5% (113/526), respectively. The differences were not significant (P = 0.59 and P = 0.99). Being <25 years of age, being on pre-pregnancy psychotherapy or psychotropic medication, frequent voluntary isolation, perception of maternity care not proceeding normally, avoiding seeking medical assistance due to fear of infection and having negative economic consequences during the COVID19 pandemic significantly increased the risk of both anxiety (GAD-7 ≥10) and depression (EPDS ≥13). Nullipara had a higher risk of anxiety, whereas being a healthcare worker had a lower risk. The personality trait factors Power (P = 0.008), Quality (P = 0.008), Stability (P < 0.001) and Contacts (P < 0.001) were significant predictors of depression among pregnant women, whereas the Quality (P = 0.005) and Contacts (P = 0.003) were significant predictors of anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, the prevalence of depression (EPDS ≥ 13) and anxiety (GAD-7 ≥ 10) was 14.5% and 21.5%, respectively, among Norwegian pregnant women. Certain sociodemographic characteristics and personality traits were significant predictors of depression and anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Adult , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Anxiety/epidemiology , Personality , Depression/epidemiology
13.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 90, 2023 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2273046

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The healthcare field, a well-known field associated with variety of stressors, leaves healthcare professionals at an increased risk of both physical and mental problems. COVID-19 pandemic has recently been added to the stressful factors by endangering further the cognitive function of healthcare workers. On another hand, personality traits have been shown to have pervasive associations with functioning across various cognitive domains. Thus, this study aims to evaluate association between personality traits and perceived cognitive function among healthcare professionals in Lebanon during the collapsing period (following the severe economic crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic). METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2021 and January 2022 enrolled 406 Lebanese participants using the convenience sampling technique for data collection. Healthcare professionals from all specialties who received the online link to the survey were eligible to participate. The Big Five Inventory-2 (BFI-2) and Fact Cog scale were used to assess personality traits and cognitive function. RESULTS: After adjustment over all variables (age, gender, household crowding index, physical activity index, marital status, profession and the other four personality traits), higher negative emotionality was significantly associated with a worse cognitive function, whereas more extroversion and conscientiousness were significantly associated with a better cognitive function. CONCLUSION: Our study adds to the narrow body of research revolving around the relationship between personality traits and perceived cognitive function in Lebanese healthcare professionals during these hard times in Lebanon. These results show that the choice of these cognitive processes is strongly affected by different personality traits, such as extroversion, conscientiousness, and negative emotionality. This study encourages the need to conduct further research that assess the changes in cognition in life stressors along with personality traits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personality , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Crowding , Family Characteristics , Cognition , Health Personnel , Delivery of Health Care
14.
Cogn Behav Ther ; 52(3): 198-212, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267867

ABSTRACT

Emerging adults with high levels of inhibited personality traits may be at-risk for drinking to cope during the COVID-19 pandemic. The current research explored mediational pathways between two inhibited personality traits (anxiety sensitivity (AS) and hopelessness (HOP)), internalizing symptoms (anxiety, depression, and COVID-19 distress), and coping drinking motives (drinking to cope with anxiety and drinking to cope with depression) during the pandemic. Cross-sectional data were collected from 879 undergraduate drinkers (79% female, 83% White, 18-25 years old) at five Canadian universities from January-April 2021. Participants self-reported on their personality, anxiety (GAD-7), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), COVID-19 distress, and coping drinking motives. Mediational path analyses provided evidence of both specific and non-specific pathways between personality and coping motives via internalizing symptoms. Depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between HOP and drinking to cope with depression motives. While anxiety symptoms did not significantly mediate links between AS and coping with anxiety motives in the full model, evidence of mediation was found in a post-hoc sensitivity analysis. COVID-19 distress served as a non-specific mediator. AS and HOP are critical transdiagnostic risk factors that increase vulnerability for internalizing psychopathology and, in turn, risky drinking motives, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking , COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Male , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Canada , Motivation , Personality , Adaptation, Psychological
15.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0281046, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265867

ABSTRACT

Respondents select the type of psychological studies that they want to participate in consistence with their needs and individual characteristics, which creates an unintentional self-selection bias. The question remains whether participants attracted by psychological studies may have more psychological dysfunctions related to personality and affective disorders compared to the general population. We investigated (N = 947; 62% women) whether the type of the invitation (to talk about recent critical or regular life events) or the source of the data (either face-to-face or online) attracts people with different psychopathology. Most importantly, participants who alone applied to take part in paid psychological studies had more symptoms of personality disorders than those who had never before applied to take part in psychological studies. The current results strongly translate into a recommendation for either the modification of recruitment strategies or much greater caution when generalizing results for this methodological reason.


Subject(s)
Mood Disorders , Personality , Humans , Female , Male , Selection Bias , Mood Disorders/psychology , Personality Disorders/epidemiology , Psychopathology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(3)2023 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265694

ABSTRACT

The onset of schizophrenia symptoms usually occurs in early youth. As a result, the parents of these patients usually become their caregivers. The role of a caregiver for a person with schizophrenia is a considerable mental and physical burden. Therefore, an interesting issue is what motivates these people to take up this challenge. It is probable that, apart from the moral imperative or kinship, the factor determining this decision is the personality structure of the caregiver. The aim of our study was to compare the structure of temperament (according to the model of temperament as formal characteristics of behavior developed by Jan Strelau) in caregivers of young adults (age 18-25 years) with schizophrenia with the structure of temperament of parents of healthy young adults still living in the family home under their care. The study group consisted of 64 people (51 women), who were taking care of young adults (aged 18-25 years) with schizophrenia, while the control group (53 people, 42 women) consisted of parents of healthy adults still living in the family home. Both groups were asked to complete a questionnaire of the authors' own design on their demographic data as well as The Formal Characteristics of Behavior-Temperament Inventory to assess the temperament traits. The results were given in the number of points obtained on average in each dimension. Both groups did not differ in terms of size and age, with women predominating. Caregivers of young adults with schizophrenia had higher values of briskness (43.22 ± 4.45 vs. 42.90 ± 3.98, p = 0.032), emotional reactivity (46.02 ± 4.39 vs. 41.01 ± 3.12, p = 0.012) and activity level (44.01.89 ± 4.15 vs. 37.59 ± 4.77, p = 0.022) compared to the control group. The remaining dimensions of temperament: perseverance, sensory sensitivity, rhythmicity, and endurance did not differentiate between the two groups. The temperament structure of caregivers of young people with schizophrenia differs from the temperament structure of caregivers of healthy adults. Caregivers of sick people have higher values of briskness, emotional reactivity, and activity level compared to the control group.


Subject(s)
Schizophrenia , Temperament , Adolescent , Young Adult , Humans , Female , Adult , Caregivers/psychology , Personality , Personality Disorders
17.
J Affect Disord ; 331: 229-237, 2023 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in increased rates of mental health problems. We examined the possible role of the personality characteristic, Locus of Control (LOC), in moderating pandemic-induced stress. METHODS: The UK-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents & Children (ALSPAC), 7021 adults (mean ages: women 57.6 (SD = 4.48); partners 60.5 (SD = 5.36)) responded to a 2020 questionnaire which included a generalised measure of LOC. Between March 2020-January 2021, questionnaires focussed on the pandemic were administered, which included measures of mental health. Over 60 % of respondents completed questionnaires at three timepoints of interest. RESULTS: In those with an internal LOC higher rates of positive well-being and reduced likelihood of anxiety and depression were shown compared to those who were external, e.g. after adjustment for socioeconomic/demographic factors mean differences in well-being score for internal compared with external women was +2.01 (95%CI +1.02,+2.10) p = 0.0001; for their partners +2.52 (95%CI +1.22,+3.82) p = 0.0002. External women were more likely than internals to have depression (adjusted OR 3.41 [95%CI 1.77,6.57] p < 0.0005. LIMITATIONS: Attrition is a problem in this 30-year-old longitudinal cohort. Those still participating are more likely to have higher education and SES levels, be female and have an internal LOC. This population suffers from a lack of ethnic diversity. CONCLUSIONS: Having an internal LOC positively moderated the effects of pandemic-induced stress on the frequency of anxiety and depression in middle-age. Programmes geared to raise internality and coping strategies may have long-term benefits on well-being in stressful situations, especially for women and frontline health professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Middle Aged , Child , Humans , Female , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Health , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Personality , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242335

ABSTRACT

Research indicates that both cognitive appraisal and personal resources can noticeably influence health behaviors, as individuals modify their health convictions and practices on the basis of threat appraisal, personality, and meaning. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether coping strategies and meaning-making can serially mediate the relationship of threat appraisal and resilience with health behaviors in recovered COVID-19 patients. Self-report measures of threat appraisal, resilience, coping, meaning-making, and health behaviors were completed by 266 participants (aged 17 to 78, 51.5% female) who had recovered from COVID-19. The serial mediation analysis showed that the relationship of threat appraisal and resilience with health behaviors was mediated by problem-focused coping, meaning-focused coping, and meaning-making, but not by emotion-focused coping. These results suggest that associations among threat perception, resilience, and health behavior depend to some extent on the interplay of coping and meaning-making, which reveals their unique role in the process of recovery from COVID-19, with potential implications for health interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Male , Adaptation, Psychological , Emotions , Personality , Health Behavior
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241910

ABSTRACT

The risk of contracting COVID-19 was a very specific situation of uncertainty and ambi-guity, and of course, cognitively interesting for psychologists studying the determinants of behaviors of different personality types. In this study, we set our sights on trying to find a correlation between adherence to wearing masks and receiving vaccinations and having certain character traits that we thought might influence preventive behavior or not. We focused on the Dark Triad-psychopathy, Machiavellianism and narcissism-as well as social approval and the need for cognition closure, as these traits have previously been linked to heightened conspiracy mentalities. We recruited 159 subjects in the experiment, including 53 male and 106 female participants over the age of 18 to take part in an online survey investigating personality and COVID-19 information. The results confirmed our hypothesis that age, empathy, the need for social approval and other psychological traits are the factors that differentiates people who wear face masks from those who do not. However, it seems impossible to define one set of features that would predispose people to not wear face masks. In our study, the importance of psychological features differed depending on the category of public places. We discuss possible implications of these findings and provide direction for future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personality , Antisocial Personality Disorder/psychology , Machiavellianism
20.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 42: 1-8, 2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240542

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of the current research was to identify the influence of university students' personality traits on their fear of COVID-19 and psychological resilience levels. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional trial was completed with 690 students. Descriptive statistics and correlations were calculated, and a path analysis was employed with the objective of assessing the model fit and investigating direct and indirect impacts. FINDINGS: Among personality traits, conscientiousness and neuroticism were observed to affect fear of COVID-19, and conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience had an effect on psychological resilience. The tested model has a good fit and explains the direct effects of the study variables. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nurses should improve university students' psychological resilience by supporting them with protective and improving factors. The role of the psychiatric nurse is important in providing conscious and need-oriented support in extraordinary events such as pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Personality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , Students/psychology , Fear
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