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1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263668, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674017

ABSTRACT

The digitalization process for organizations, which was inevitably accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, raises relevant challenges for Human Resource Management (HRM) because every technological implementation has a certain impact on human beings. Between many organizational HRM practices, recruitment and assessment interviews represent a significant moment where a social interaction provides the context for evaluating candidates' skills. It is therefore relevant to investigate how different interaction frames and relational conditions affect such task, with a specific focus on the differences between face-to-face (FTF) and remote computer-mediated (RCM) interaction settings. In particular, the possibility of qualifying and quantifying the mechanisms shaping the efficiency of interaction in the recruiter-candidate dyad-i.e. interpersonal attunement-is potentially insightful. We here present a neuroscientific protocol aimed at elucidating the impact of FTF vs. RCM modalities on social dynamics within assessment interviews. Specifically, the hyperscanning approach, understood as the concurrent recording and integrated analysis of behavioural-physiological responses of interacting agents, will be used to evaluate recruiter-candidate dyads while they are involved in either FTF or RCM conditions. Specifically, the protocol has been designed to collect self-report, oculometric, autonomic (electrodermal activity, heart rate, heart rate variability), and neurophysiological (electroencephalography) metrics from both inter-agents to explore the perceived quality of the interaction, automatic visual-attentional patterns of inter-agents, as well as their cognitive workload and emotional engagement. The proposed protocol will provide a theoretical evidence-based framework to assess possible differences between FTF vs. RMC settings in complex social interactions, with a specific focus on job interviews.


Subject(s)
Employment/statistics & numerical data , Eye Movements/physiology , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/methods , Psychometrics , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , Employment/psychology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Video Recording
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7829-7832, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As a result of COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 US residency MATCH was devoid of the traditional in-person interviews. Herein, we assess the impact of Virtual Interviews (VIs) on resident selection, from the perspectives of Orthopedic Surgery (OS) Program Directors (PDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 14-item survey was sent to PDs of ACGME-accredited OS residencies. Questions were designed to assess the pros, cons, and robustness of VIs compared to their antecedent in-person format. RESULTS: Forty-seven PDs responded to our survey. VIs antagonized PDs' ability to assess applicants' fit to program (76.6%), commitment to specialty (64%), and interpersonal skills (68.1%). This led to heavier dependence upon applicants' portfolios (64%). Almost all respondents (97.9%) found VIs to be more cost-efficient, saving a median of $3000 in interview-related expenses. Overall, only 8.5% of PDs were willing to conduct exclusive VIs in future cycles, compared to the majority in favor of dual formats (51.5%) or exclusive in-person interviews (40.4%). CONCLUSIONS: VIs have been an overall success, making most PDs opt for dual interview formats in future cycles. How this technology is further implemented in the future remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Physician Executives/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/trends
4.
Pediatrics ; 148(4)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443877

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic significantly impacted undergraduate and graduate medical education and created challenges that prevented a traditional approach to residency and fellowship recruitment and interviews. Early in the pandemic, the pediatric education community came together to support applicants and training programs and to foster an equitable recruitment process. We describe many of our community's innovations, including the use of virtual cafés to educate programs and highlight best practices for virtual recruitment and the use of regional webinars to highlight residency programs and provide information to applicants. Surveys of applicants and programs suggest that the virtual interview process worked well overall, with applicants and programs saving both time and money and programs maintaining a high rate of filling their positions. On the basis of this experience, we highlight the strengths and weaknesses of 3 potential models for future interview seasons. We close with a series of questions that need further investigation to create an effective and equitable recruitment process for the future.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Internet , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic/methods , Pediatrics/education , Personnel Selection/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Job Application , Pandemics , Pediatrics/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
8.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(6)2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357581

ABSTRACT

To investigate the extent to which dermatology programs use social media to connect with applicants, we conducted a search of all 140 residency programs on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Our search revealed 74 (53%) Instagram, 21 (15%) Facebook, 20 (14%) Twitter, and four (3%) YouTube accounts for dermatology programs, with the number of Instagram accounts increasing five-fold from the end of 2019 to present. Our results demonstrate that conditions created during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerated dermatology residency programs' acceptance of social media, particularly Instagram, as a means to communicate and share information with applicants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/trends , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data
10.
Surgery ; 171(1): 259-264, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309392

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons Comprehensive Endocrine Surgery Fellowship interview stakeholders previously favored in-person interviews, despite time and expense. This study assessed perception changes given mandated virtual interviews because of coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: Immediately after the 2020 Match, anonymous surveys were distributed to applicants (n = 37) and program directors (n = 22). Mixed-methods analyses were used to evaluate responses. Results were compared to data from a prior study of the 2013 to 2018 in-person interview process. RESULTS: Response rates were 82% (program directors) and 60% (applicants). Compared with prior applicants, 2020 applicants attended similar numbers of interviews (1-10, 32% vs 37%; P = .61), used fewer vacation days (23% vs 56%; P = .01), and most reported 0 expenses. Burdens included lack of protected time for interviews. The virtual format did not compromise applicant ability to meet faculty (mean rank = 6.8/10) or make favorable impressions (mean rank = 6.8/10). Program directors reported equivalent or improved assessments of applicants. Program directors (72%) and applicants (77%) indicated that future interviews should be partially or completely virtual. CONCLUSION: In contrast to prior survey data, applicants and program directors now express interest in virtual or hybrid interview processes. Virtual interviews were less costly, less time-consuming, and met goals effectively. Integrating virtual interview components will require innovative strategies to reduce redundancies and promote equitable access.


Subject(s)
Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic , Personnel Selection/methods , Videoconferencing , Attitude of Health Personnel , Follow-Up Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
17.
J Med Syst ; 45(3): 36, 2021 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070897

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic required a shift of graduate medical education recruitment to a virtual format. In order to share information and insight into the culture of our program with applicants, we created a smartphone app for those that were invited for an interview. By collecting the analytics of the app, we were able to follow trends in the timing of applicants downloading the app, their viewing histories, and when information was accessed. The app was mostly downloaded at the time of the interview invite or 48 h prior to the interview day. Around the interview day, applicants tended to access trainee profiles, faculty profiles, and videos about the program and community. Closer to the rank list due date, training information, the graduate medical education (GME) documents, and the diversity and wellness initiatives seemed to have more activity. This analysis from the use of a smartphone app in virtual recruitment gives insight into the use of a smartphone app by applicants, and the information that they find useful during the process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Mobile Applications , Personnel Selection/methods , Smartphone , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria
18.
J Surg Res ; 262: 240-243, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062498

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-COV-2 pandemic created the need for social distancing and the implementation of nonessential travel bans, residency and fellowship programs have moved toward a web-based virtual process for applicant interviews. As part of the Society of Asian Academic Surgeons 5th Annual Meeting, an expert panel was convened to provide guidance for prospective applicants who are new to the process. This article provides perspectives from applicants who have successfully navigated the surgical subspecialty fellowship process, as well as program leadership who have held virtual interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/methods , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Certification/organization & administration , Certification/standards , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Physical Distancing , Social Interaction , Specialty Boards , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/standards
19.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(4): 1188-1192, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059926

ABSTRACT

In a study of US Marine recruits, seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 IgG was 9.0%. Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black participants and participants from states affected earlier in the pandemic had higher seropositivity rates. These results suggest the need for targeted public health strategies among young adults at increased risk for infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Health , Military Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19 Serological Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Female , Humans , Male , Military Health/ethnology , Military Health/statistics & numerical data , Military Health Services , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 29(7): 271-277, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976459

ABSTRACT

On May 7, 2020, the Coalition for Physician Accountability's released "Medical Students in the Class of 2021: Moving Across Institutions for Post Graduate Training," which comprises official recommendations on keeping programs and medical students safe during the upcoming match cycle with the challenges posed by COVID-19. In these recommendations, away rotations are discouraged, and all programs are compelled to commit to virtual interviews. Unlike employers and applicants in other industries, orthopaedic residency/fellowship programs and candidates seeking those positions have not routinely conducted virtual interviews. Without in-person interviews, applicants may perceive a limited ability to demonstrate their qualifications, judge program culture, and gauge ultimate program compatibility. Likewise, programs may perceive the inability to evaluate a candidate in real time, physically show program strengths, and ultimately judge applicant compatibility. Careful preparation and execution of a virtual interview can overcome these perceived limitations, whereas benefits, such as decreased cost for both programs and applicants, can make virtual interviews appealing. The purpose of this review was to help define a virtual interview, illustrate the benefits, and offer tips to both programs and applicants on how to prepare and perform optimally on an interview day.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic , Orthopedics/education , Personnel Selection , COVID-19/psychology , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/methods , User-Computer Interface
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