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2.
J Vasc Surg ; 74(4): 1354-1361.e4, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237797

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Integrated vascular surgery residency is among the most competitive specialties, but little is known about the applicant perspective. The coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak impacted the 2021 integrated vascular surgery residency match because of travel restrictions. We sought to better understand pre-pandemic applicant recruitment strategies, logistics of away rotations, and the residency interview process to identify areas for improvement in the application process. METHODS: An anonymous survey was sent to matched students in 2020, inquiring about motivations for pursuing vascular surgery (VS), logistic of away rotations and interviews, and factors influencing students' rank lists. RESULTS: Seventy of the 73 matched students completed the survey (95.9% response rate). The median age was 27 (range, 25-41); 32.9% were female, 91.4% were U.S. medical students, and 77.1% were from institutions with a VS training program. Factors most strongly influencing the decision to choose VS as a career were interest in open vascular procedures, endovascular procedures, perceived job satisfaction, emerging technologies, and influence of a mentor. The prospect of the job market, future salary, and competitiveness of the application process had the least impact. Of the matched students, 82.9% completed an away rotation (median, 2; range, 1-4), with 51.7% of students paying a total cost of more than $2500. Fifty percent of students matched either at their home institution or where they had performed an away rotation. Students reported application submissions to a median of 50 programs (range, 1-70) and interviewed at 17 (range, 1-28), with 40% of students paying a total of more than $4000 for interview costs. The most significant factors affecting students' rank lists included program culture, open aortic surgical volume, geography, and complex endovascular procedure volume. Tours of facilities, resident salary, and male/female distribution had the least importance. CONCLUSIONS: Successfully matched applicants in 2020 prioritized operative case volume and program collegiality when ranking programs. Despite their high cost, away rotations played an important role in the Match, suggesting that time spent at potential institutions allowed ideal assessment of factors for students. The high average number of away rotations and in-person interviews performed in 2019-2020 was limited for the 2021 Match due to coronavirus disease 2019 restrictions. Programs will have to continue developing creative alternatives or additions to away rotations and the application processes to assure continued success in future post-pandemic Match cycles.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Male , Mentors , Motivation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/education , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Travel
5.
J Surg Res ; 262: 240-243, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062498

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-COV-2 pandemic created the need for social distancing and the implementation of nonessential travel bans, residency and fellowship programs have moved toward a web-based virtual process for applicant interviews. As part of the Society of Asian Academic Surgeons 5th Annual Meeting, an expert panel was convened to provide guidance for prospective applicants who are new to the process. This article provides perspectives from applicants who have successfully navigated the surgical subspecialty fellowship process, as well as program leadership who have held virtual interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/methods , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Certification/organization & administration , Certification/standards , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Physical Distancing , Social Interaction , Specialty Boards , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/standards
6.
J Surg Res ; 260: 516-519, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997219

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unique challenges to medical education. With the lack of in-person away rotations for the 2020-2021 residency application cycle, virtual rotations have surfaced as an alternative. The virtual rotations that the authors participated in allowed for active participation in various resident educational activities such as journal club, grand rounds, and morning conferences. One critical aspect of virtual rotations was the one-on-one meetings with the program leadership. In addition to a virtual tour of the hospital and campus, many programs offered virtual social hours with the residents to converse about the program, the city, and the match process. A few programs even allowed applicants to attend virtually live-streamed surgeries. These rotations offer students, especially those without a corresponding home program, an invaluable opportunity to express their interest in a particular program and gain foundational knowledge about the specialty. Virtual rotations also provide underrepresented minorities and international medical graduates with clinical exposure, mentorship, and networking opportunities, mitigating some of the challenges presented by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cultural Diversity , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Mentors , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Teaching Rounds/methods , Teaching Rounds/organization & administration , Teaching Rounds/statistics & numerical data
7.
Am J Surg ; 222(1): 99-103, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917204

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID crisis hit during the interview season for the Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) fellowship. With minimal time to adapt, all programs transitioned to virtual interviews. Here we describe the experience of both program directors (PDs) and candidates with virtual interviews, and provide guidelines for implementation based on the results. METHODS: Surveys regarding interview day specifics and perceptions were created for CGSO fellowship PDs and candidates. They were distributed at the conclusion of the season, prior to match. RESULTS: Thirty (94%) PDs and 64 (79%) candidates responded. Eighty-three% of PDs and 79% of candidates agreed or strongly agreed that they felt comfortable creating a rank list. If given the choice, 60% of PDs and 45% of candidates would choose virtual interviews over in-person interviews. The majority of candidates found PD overviews, fellows only sessions and pre-interview materials helpful. CONCLUSION: Overall, the majority of PDs and candidates felt comfortable creating a rank list; however, more PDs preferred virtual interviews for the future. Our results also confirm key components of a virtual interview day.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Personal Satisfaction , Personnel Selection/methods , Surgical Oncology/education , Telecommunications/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Oncology/organization & administration , Surgical Oncology/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data
8.
J Surg Res ; 259: 326-331, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894081

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, many Pediatric Surgery Fellowship programs were forced to convert their normal in-person interviews into virtual interviews. This study sought to determine the perceived value of virtual interviews for Pediatric Surgery Fellowship. METHODS: An anonymous survey was distributed to the applicants and faculty at a university-affiliated, free-standing children's hospital with a Pediatric Surgery fellowship program that conducted one of three interview days using a virtual format. RESULTS: All applicants who responded to the survey had at least one interview that was converted to a virtual interview. Faculty (75%) and applicants (87.5%) preferred in-person interviews over virtual interviews; most applicants (57%) did not feel they got to know the program as well with the virtual format. Applicants and faculty felt that virtual interviews could potentially be used as a screening tool in the future (7/10 Likert) but did not recommend they be used as a complete replacement for in-person interviews (3.5-5/10 Likert). Applicants were more likely than faculty to report that interview type influenced their final rank list (5 versus 3/10 Likert). CONCLUSIONS: Faculty and applicants preferred in-person interviews and did not recommend that virtual interviews replace in-person interviews. As the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic continues, more virtual interviews will be necessary, and innovations may be necessary to ensure an optimal interview process. TYPE OF STUDY: Survey. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: N/A.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Videoconferencing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Interviews as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
11.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol ; 130(5): 450-458, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724708

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To capture the perspectives of candidates applying for otolaryngology residency positions in the 2020-21 cycle, in the context of disruption caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Candidates planning to apply to the otolaryngology 2020-21 match were invited to complete a cross-sectional online survey. Distribution was via otomatch.com and word of mouth. Descriptive statistics were performed. RESULTS: Of 85 eligible responses (estimated 18.9% of all applicants), many have had at least one board examination (71.8%) disrupted. A majority (85.9%) believe evaluation of candidates will change due to the pandemic, and 54.1% report they were now less confident in matching. Female applicants (37.6% of respondents) were found to have significantly higher odds of decreased confidence in matching (OR 2.781 [95% CI 1.045-7.4044]; P = .041). Many report a move to virtual interviews would increase the number of applications submitted (45.9%) and the number of interviews attended (77.6%). Some applicants (36.5%) did not believe residency programs would gather sufficient information about their candidacy to make an informed decision, and most (62.4%) did not believe that they would gather sufficient information to inform their own rank list. CONCLUSIONS: We find that candidates believe their candidacy will be assessed differently in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, are largely less confident in successfully matching, and are planning to apply and interview more broadly. These data are relevant to otolaryngology residency leadership to inform clear dialogue and a smooth transition into an unprecedented application cycle.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Job Application , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Aptitude Tests , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Male , Organizational Innovation , Otolaryngology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Concept , United States
12.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8150, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646276

ABSTRACT

Academic institutions work diligently each year to recruit, retain, and graduate Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students who will be positive contributors to our healthcare system. The immergence of a novel coronavirus in 2019 (COVID-19) has threatened these systems. This commentary is a discussion of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the enrollment management processes of PharmD degree programs, including recruitment, admissions, orientation, retention, and graduation. The authors highlight enrollment management processes that may forever be changed by the COVID-19 pandemic. This commentary is intended to assist pharmacy administrators as they reflect on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their own programs and develop strategies to minimize the negative effects.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Pharmacy/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Pharmacy/standards , Humans , Licensure, Pharmacy/standards , Pandemics , Personnel Selection/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , School Admission Criteria , Schools, Pharmacy/standards
14.
J Surg Res ; 255: 96-98, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601796

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a variety of challenges in the medical education curriculum, one of which is the possible loss of summer and fall away rotations for fourth year students applying into surgical subspecialties. Subsequently, a lack of in-person evaluations may have a major impact on an applicant's perception of the residency and the program's ability to assess the individual applicant. This is especially crucial for applicants without a home program in their specialty of interest, as away rotations are an important opportunity to confirm interest in pursuit of a subspecialty, obtain letters of recommendation, and make positive impressions at programs of interest. The objective of this article is to assess the current COVID-19 pandemic situation in light of away rotations and to provide recommendations for surgical subspecialty programs and applicants to have the best outcome during this upcoming application cycle. In particular, we emphasize the importance of implementing universal processes within each individual subspecialty. This will provide equitable opportunities for all applicants, minimizing potential biases or disadvantages based on geographic location or availability of a program at an applicant's home institution.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Students, Medical , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires
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