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2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7829-7832, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As a result of COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 US residency MATCH was devoid of the traditional in-person interviews. Herein, we assess the impact of Virtual Interviews (VIs) on resident selection, from the perspectives of Orthopedic Surgery (OS) Program Directors (PDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 14-item survey was sent to PDs of ACGME-accredited OS residencies. Questions were designed to assess the pros, cons, and robustness of VIs compared to their antecedent in-person format. RESULTS: Forty-seven PDs responded to our survey. VIs antagonized PDs' ability to assess applicants' fit to program (76.6%), commitment to specialty (64%), and interpersonal skills (68.1%). This led to heavier dependence upon applicants' portfolios (64%). Almost all respondents (97.9%) found VIs to be more cost-efficient, saving a median of $3000 in interview-related expenses. Overall, only 8.5% of PDs were willing to conduct exclusive VIs in future cycles, compared to the majority in favor of dual formats (51.5%) or exclusive in-person interviews (40.4%). CONCLUSIONS: VIs have been an overall success, making most PDs opt for dual interview formats in future cycles. How this technology is further implemented in the future remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Physician Executives/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/trends
8.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 28(4): 1908-1915, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the era of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), many Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) fellowship programs implemented virtual interviews (VI) during the 2020 interview season. At our institution, we had the unique opportunity to conduct an in-person interview (IPI) prior to the pandemic-related travel restrictions, and a VI after the restrictions were in place. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to understand how the VI model compares with the traditional IPI approach. METHODS: Online surveys were distributed to both groups, collecting feedback on their interview experience. Responses were evaluated using a two-sample t test assuming equal variances. RESULTS: Twenty-three of 26 (88%) applicants completed the survey. Most applicants reported that the interview gave them a satisfactory understanding of the CGSO fellowship (100% IPI, 92% VI) and the majority in both groups felt that the interview experience allowed them to accurately represent themselves (92% and 82%, respectively). All participants in the IPI group felt they were able to get an adequate understanding of the culture of the program, while only 64% in the VI group agreed with that statement (p = 0.02). IPI applicants were more likely to agree that the interview experience was sufficient to allow them to make a ranking decision (92% vs. 54%; p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: While the VI modality offers several advantages over the IPI, it still falls short in conveying some of the more subjective aspects of the programs, including program culture. Strategies to provide applicants with better insight into these areas during the VI will be important moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/trends , Surgeons/education , Surgical Oncology/education , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telecommunications , Videoconferencing
9.
J Surg Educ ; 78(2): 612-621, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779343

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The virtual interview for residency and fellowship applicants has previously been utilized preliminarily in their respective processes. The COVID-19 pandemic forced many programs to switch to a virtual interview process on short notice. In the independent plastic surgery process, which was underway when the pandemic started, applicants had a heterogeneous experience of in-person and virtual interviews. The purpose of this study was to assess if applicants prefer a virtual interview experience to an in-person interview as well as determine if virtual interview applicants had a different opinion of a program compared to the in-person interview applicants. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The 2019 to 2020 applicants who interviewed at the Indiana University Independent Plastic Surgery program were administered an anonymous online survey about their interview experience at our program. RESULTS: Our survey response was 60% (18/30). The in-person interview group (n = 10) rated their overall interview experience higher than the virtual interview group (n = 8) 8.8 vs 7.5 (p = 0.0314). The in-person interview group felt they became more acquainted with the program, the faculty, and the residents more than the virtual group (4.7 vs 3.25, p < 0.0001) (4.3 vs 3.25, p = 0.0194) (4.3 vs 2.75, p < 0.0001). The majority of applicants favored in-person interviews (16/18, 88.9%). The in-person interview group spent significantly more money on their interview at our program compared to the virtual interview group ($587 vs $0, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that the virtual interview process was an efficient process for applicants from both a financial and time perspective. However, the virtual interview process left applicants less satisfied with their interview experience. The applicants felt they did not become as acquainted with the program as their in-person counterparts. The virtual interview process may play a large role in residency and fellowship applications in the future, and programs should spend time on how to improve the process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Personnel Selection/trends , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Education, Medical, Graduate , Female , Humans , Indiana/epidemiology , Interviews as Topic , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 27(Suppl 3): 911-915, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291326

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has overlapped with the scheduled interview periods of over 20 surgical subspecialty fellowships, including the Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) fellowships in the National Resident Matching Program and the Society of Surgical Oncology's Breast Surgical Oncology fellowships. We outline the successful implementation of and processes behind a virtual interview day for CGSO fellowship recruitment after the start of the pandemic. METHODS: The virtual CGSO fellowship interview process at the University of Chicago Medicine and NorthShore University Health System was outlined and implemented. Separate voluntary, anonymous online secure feedback surveys were email distributed to interview applicants and faculty interviewers after the interview day concluded. RESULTS: Sixteen of 20 interview applicants (80.0%) and 12 of 13 faculty interviewers (92.3%) completed their respective feedback surveys. Seventy-five percent (12/16) of applicants and all faculty respondents (12/12) stated the interview process was 'very seamless' or 'seamless'. Applicants and faculty highlighted decreased cost, time savings, and increased efficiency as some of the benefits to virtual interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Current circumstances related to the COVID-19 pandemic require fellowship programs to adapt and conduct virtual interviews. Our report describes the successful implementation of a virtual interview process. This report describes the technical steps and pitfalls of organizing such an interview and provides insights into the experience of the interviewer and interviewee.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Interviews as Topic/methods , Personnel Selection/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Specialties, Surgical , Surgical Oncology/education , User-Computer Interface , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chicago , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialties, Surgical/classification , Specialties, Surgical/education
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