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2.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 37(1): 48-53, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006320

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aim to describe the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) preparedness efforts among a diverse set of pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) within the United States. METHODS: We conducted a prospective multicenter survey of PED medical director(s) from selected children's hospitals recruited through a long established national research network. The questionnaire was developed by physicians with expertise in pediatric emergency medicine, disaster readiness, human factors, and survey development. Thirty-five children's hospitals were identified for recruitment through an established national research network. RESULTS: We report on survey responses from 25 (71%) of 35 PEDs, of which 64% were located within academic children's hospitals. All PEDs witnessed decreases in non-COVID-19 patients, 60% had COVID-19-dedicated units, and 32% changed their unit pediatric patient age to include adult patients. All PEDs implemented changes to their staffing model, with the most common change impacting their physician staffing (80%) and triaging model (76%). All PEDs conducted training for appropriate donning and doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE), and 62% reported shortages in PPE. The majority implemented changes in the airway management protocols (84%) and cardiac arrest management in COVID patients (76%). The most common training modalities were video/teleconference (84%) and simulation-based training (72%). The most common learning objectives were team dynamics (60%), and PPE and individual procedural skills (56%). CONCLUSIONS: This national survey provides insight into PED preparedness efforts, training innovations, and practice changes implemented during the start of COVID-19 pandemic. Pediatric emergency departments implemented broad strategies including modifications to staffing, workflow, and clinical practice while using video/teleconference and simulation as preferred training modalities. Further research is needed to advance the level of preparedness and support deep learning about which preparedness actions were effective for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disaster Planning , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Care Surveys , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disaster Planning/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Prospective Studies , Simulation Training , Telecommunications , Triage , United States
3.
Simul Healthc ; 16(1): 46-51, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960653

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY STATEMENT: Simulation played a critical role in our institution's response to the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City. With the rapid influx of critically ill patients, resource limitations, and presented safety concerns, simulation became a vital tool that provided solutions to the many challenges we faced. In this article, we describe how simulation training was deployed at our institution throughout the course of the pandemic, which included the period of our medical surge. Simulation helped refine protocols, facilitate practice changes, uncover safety gaps, and train redeployed healthcare workers in unfamiliar roles. We also discuss the obstacles we encountered with implementing simulations during the pandemic, the measures we took to adapt to our limitations, and the simulation strategies and end products that were derived from these adaptations.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/education , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Airway Management/methods , Critical Illness , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Hospital Rapid Response Team/organization & administration , Humans , New York City , Patient Positioning , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(6): 743-745, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-882836

ABSTRACT

Strategies for pandemic preparedness and response are urgently needed for all settings. We describe our experience using inverted classroom methodology (ICM) for COVID-19 pandemic preparedness in a small hospital with limited infection prevention staff. ICM for pandemic preparedness was feasible and contributed to an increase in COVID-19 knowledge and comfort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Personnel, Hospital/education , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Feasibility Studies , Hospital Bed Capacity , Humans , Teaching/organization & administration
5.
Biochem Med (Zagreb) ; 30(3): 030403, 2020 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-874945

ABSTRACT

To fight the virus SARS-CoV-2 spread to Europe from China and to give support to the collapsed public health system, the Spanish Health Authorities developed a field hospital located in the facilities of Madrid exhibition centre (IFEMA) to admit and treat patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infectious disease (COVID-19). The Department of Laboratory Medicine of La Paz University Hospital in Madrid (LMD-HULP) was designated to provide laboratory services. Due to the emergency, the IFEMA field hospital had to be prepared for patient admission in less than 1 week and the laboratory professionals had to collaborate in a multidisciplinary group to assure that resources were available to start on time. The LMD-HULP participated together with the managers in the design of the tests portfolio and the integration of the healthcare information systems (IS) (hospital IS, laboratory IS and POCT management system). Laboratorians developed a strategy to quickly train clinicians and nurses on test requests, sample collection procedures and management/handling of the POCT blood gas analyser both by written materials and training videos. The IFEMA´s preanalytical unit managed 3782 requests, and more than 11,000 samples from March 27th to April 30th. Furthermore, 1151 samples were measured by blood gas analysers. In conclusion, laboratory professionals must be resilient and have to respond timely in emergencies as this pandemic. The lab's personnel selection, design and monitoring indicators to maintain and further improve the quality and value of laboratory services is crucial to support medical decision making and provide better patient care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Mobile Health Units/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Cities , Clinical Laboratory Information Systems/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospital Information Systems/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Humans , Laboratories, Hospital/organization & administration , Personnel, Hospital/education , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Point-of-Care Testing/organization & administration , Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Specimen Handling
7.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 17: 19, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-625258

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients before and after a multi-professional simulation-based course in Pakistan. Health workers' perceptions of preparedness, safety, and their willingness to care for COVID-19 patients were measured before and after they attended a simulation-based training course to prepare them to care for COVID-19 patients at Combined Military Hospital Landi Kotal Cantt, from March 1 to April 30, 2020. The participants' perceived level of safety and preparedness to care for COVID-19 patients before the simulation-based course was low, but increased after completing it (P<0.05). They felt confident and were significantly more willing to care for patients with COVID-19 or other infections requiring strict isolation. Simulation-based training is an effective tool to improve perceptions of risk and readiness to deal with COVID-19 among medical and non-medical health workers in Pakistan.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Interprofessional Relations , Personnel, Hospital/education , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Simulation Training/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Program Evaluation , Safety , Self Efficacy , Young Adult
8.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(5): 518-520, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607245

ABSTRACT

It is estimated that more than 300,000 people have died because of COVID-19 globally. The vast majority of documented deaths have occurred within hospitals, leading to psychological impacts on both family members and health care workers. This paper describes the actions (online death notification education, remote crisis intervention, and support for health care professionals) taken at a hospital in Mexico to address the psychological impacts of the notification of a COVID-19-related death on both the deceased's relatives and the health care personnel involved. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Crisis Intervention , Death , Family , Mental Health Services , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Pneumonia, Viral , Professional-Family Relations , Social Support , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Humans , Mexico , Personnel, Hospital/education , Personnel, Hospital/psychology
9.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(6): 420-423, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-594706

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To develop an emergency training program of personal protective equipment (PPE) for general healthcare workers (HCWs) who may be under the threat of Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and evaluate the effect of the program. METHODS: A three-stage training program was designed. The complete clinical workflow together with infectious disease ward was simulated. To verify the effect of the program, an experimental training with pre- and post-test was conducted before large-scale training. RESULTS: Post-test scores were significantly improved when compared with the pre-test scores. Among all PPE, N95 respirator and protective coverall needed training most. Meanwhile, "proficiency level" and "mutual check & help" also needed to be strengthened as independent scoring points. CONCLUSION: This training program significantly improved the performances of participants. It may therefore be applied for general HCWs on a larger scale.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Continuing/methods , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel, Hospital/education , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , China , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Male , Models, Educational , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Simulation Training/methods , Tertiary Care Centers
10.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(2): 271-274, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459195

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if rapid implementation of simulation training for the nasopharyngeal swab procedure can increase provider confidence regarding procedure competency. METHODS: A simulation training exercise was designed as a departmental initiative to improve competency performing nasopharyngeal swabs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sixty-one health care workers attended teaching sessions led by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology on proper nasopharyngeal swab technique. After a brief lecture, participants practiced their swab technique using a high-fidelity airway simulation model. Pre- and postintervention self-evaluations were measured via standardized clinical competency questionnaires on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from "No knowledge, unable to perform" up to "Highly knowledgeable and confident, independent." RESULTS: Forty-six participants in this study submitted pre- and postintervention self-assessments. Postintervention scores improved on average 1.41 points (95% CI, 1.10-1.73) out of 5 from a mean score of 3.13 to 4.54 (P < .0001). This reflects a large effect size with a Glass's delta value of 1.3. DISCUSSION: Lecture coupled with simulation-based teaching can significantly improve health care workers' confidence in performing nasopharyngeal swabs. Proper training for frontline workers performing swabs for COVID-19 is essential to improving testing accuracy and can be achieved in a simple and timely manner. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: To meet the testing needs of the growing pandemic, many health care workers who are unfamiliar with nasopharyngeal swabs have been asked to perform this test. Simulation-based teaching sessions may improve health care workers' confidence and help prevent false-negative results. This intervention is easily reproducible in any setting where frequent nasopharyngeal swab testing occurs. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE/STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Nasopharynx/virology , Personnel, Hospital/education , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Simulation Training , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Chicago , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Humans , Inservice Training/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital , Tertiary Care Centers
11.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 36(4): 253-255, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621101

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus 2019-nCoV (COVID-19) has disrupted and altered the way health care is delivered in the United States and across the world. Patient care guidelines and isolation recommendations continue to hastily change, demonstrating the key role of nursing professional development practitioners in educating and preparing frontline staff to provide safe patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article describes a community hospital's strategic educational response to a highly contagious respiratory pandemic. Initiatives to increase staff education and conserve personal protective equipment are discussed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Personnel, Hospital/education , United States/epidemiology
12.
Stroke ; 51(7): 2273-2275, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-327109

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, infectious disease control is of utmost importance in acute stroke treatment. This is a new situation for most stroke teams that often leads to uncertainty among physicians, nurses, and technicians who are in immediate contact with patients. The situation is made even more complicated by numerous new regulations and protocols that are released in rapid succession. Herein, we are describing our experience with simulation training for COVID-19 stroke treatment protocols. One week of simulation training allowed us to identify numerous latent safety threats and to adjust our institution-specific protocols to mitigate them. It also helped our physicians and nurses to practice relevant tasks and behavioral patterns (eg, proper donning and doffing PPE, where to dispose potentially contaminated equipment) to minimize their infectious exposure and to adapt to the new situation. We therefore strongly encourage other hospitals to adopt simulation training to prepare their medical teams for code strokes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Neurology/education , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital/education , Pneumonia, Viral , Simulation Training , Stroke/therapy , Airway Management/methods , COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/education , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Safety , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Protective Devices , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Thrombectomy/education , Thrombectomy/methods , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Time-to-Treatment
14.
J Hosp Infect ; 105(3): 430-433, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133626

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to predict the preventive behaviours of healthcare workers (HCWs) towards COVID-19 based on the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT). This cross-sectional and analytical study was conducted on 761 HCWs in Hamadan, Iran, using multi-stage random sampling. The preventive behaviours against COVID-19 among HCWs were assessed at a relatively desirable level. Based on the PMT, threat and coping appraisal were predictors of protection motivation to conduct COVID-19 preventive behaviours (P<0.001). The intention was also predictive of COVID-19 preventive behaviours (P<0.001). Consideration of personnel's self-efficacy and their knowledge regarding the effectiveness of protective behaviours in designing staff training programmes are recommended.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Motivation , Personnel, Hospital/education , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy , Young Adult
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