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1.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 39, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502776

ABSTRACT

Introduction: as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spreads, sleep problems are expected to increase among healthcare workers. Therefore, we aimed to assess the knowledge of COVID-19, sleep problem and identify sociodemographic factors associated with sleep problems among healthcare workers in a Nigerian neuropsychiatric hospital. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 healthcare workers in a neuropsychiatric hospital using self-administered questionnaires to assess knowledge of COVID-19, sleep problem, social support, and sociodemographic factors that affect sleep. Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation were applied to assess the association between sociodemographic factors and sleep problems. Results: about 23.9% of the healthcare workers reported having a sleep problem. However, there was no association of sleep problems with any sociodemographic factors except age (r=0.26) and social support (r=-0.18). Conclusion: the study offered insight into the occurrence of sleep problems among healthcare workers and suggested a guide for planning interventions targeted at improving the psychological well-being of healthcare workers in the face of current global pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Male , Nigeria , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e225, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467028

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy remains a serious global threat to achieve herd immunity, and this study aimed to assess the magnitude and associated factors of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy among healthcare workers (HCWs) in Amhara regional referral hospitals. A web-based anonymised survey was conducted among 440 HCWs in the Amhara region referral hospitals. The questionnaire was designed using Google Forms and distributed using telegram and e-mail from 15 May to 10 June 2021 to the randomly selected participants in each hospital. The data were analysed with Stata 14.0 and described using frequency tables. A multivariable binary logistic regression model was fitted and model fitness was checked with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test. Out of 440 participants, 418 were willing to participate in the study and the mean age was about 30 years. Overall, 45.9% (n = 192) of participants reported vaccine hesitancy. After applying multivariate analysis, age ≤25 years (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 5.6); do not wear a mask (aOR = 2.4); not compliance with physical distancing (aOR = 3.6); unclear information by public health authorities (aOR = 2.5); low risk of getting COVID-19 infection (aOR = 2.8); and not sure about the tolerability of the vaccine (aOR = 3.76) were associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. A considerable proportion of HCWs were hesitant towards COVID-19 vaccine, and this can be tackled with the provision of clear information about the vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Adult , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Risk Factors , Secondary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
3.
Acta Otolaryngol ; 141(8): 791-795, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care workers (HCW) at otorhinolaryngological departments have an increased risk of contracting COVID-19, due to aerosol-inducing diagnostic and surgical procedures in the airways. The ongoing exposure to physical and psychological stressors could impact the mental health of HCW. AIM/OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact on mental health in an otorhinolaryngological department during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS/METHOD: Cross-sectional questionnaire study, assessing symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-10). Physicians, nurses, and secretaries were included at a tertiary department of otorhinolaryngology in the Capital Region of Denmark during the COVID-19 lockdown in spring 2020. RESULTS: Positive screenings for stress reactions were found in 22% for depressive symptoms and 15.5% anxiety. 27% feared becoming infected, 47% feared infecting their families in relation to work. 27% felt others were distancing from them, and 38% isolated themselves from others because of their work. Women had an odds ratio of 9.18 (CI 1.49-179) for depressive stress reactions. CONCLUSION: HCW were primarily concerned with transmitting COVID-19 to their relatives. Secondarily, there was a concern about becoming infected despite feeling adequately protected by personal protective equipment. Women were at higher risk of more severe depressive symptoms when corrected for professions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Otolaryngology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Denmark , Female , Hospital Departments , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers
4.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 146(16): e58-e64, 2021 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303812

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 27, 2020, employees of the health system in Germany have been vaccinated against the SARS coronavirus-2 with the vaccine BNT162B2. Initial observations show that especially among younger vaccinated people side effects are common. In this study, using the example of clinic employees, the self-perceived well-being after the first and second dose of the vaccine was examined. METHODS: Anonymized online questionnaire to be filled out once by all employees after the second dose of BNT162B2 was offered. The severity of side effects was queried using an ordinal numerical rating scale with values between 0 and 10. Other key data points were age, gender, and occupational group. The ability to work in the days following the injections was recorded by self-reporting. RESULTS: Data from 555 respondents were evaluated. The mean age was 40.25 years (standard deviation 12.35). 56 % of the respondents were female, 44.3 % belonged to the medical service, 42.9 % to the nursing service and 12.8 % were assigned to other professional groups with COVID-19 patient contact. Around 2 % of all employees did not experience any side effects at all. The most common side effect was pain at the injection site. Fatigue, headaches and myalgia followed with decreasing frequency. After the first dose, ¾ of the respondents said they had tolerated the vaccination well overall, after the second dose it was only half. After the first dose, over 90 % of the respondents felt that they were able to work again on the following day, after the second dose one third stated that they were only able to work again on the second day. 2.2 % of all employees had to report that they were unable to work for at least one day after the first dose and 19.5 % after the second dose. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination with BNT162B2 frequently leads to side effects, especially after the second dose. Perception of side effects resulted in 19 % of those questioned being sick after the second dose. Nevertheless, 95 % of all respondents would choose a coronavirus vaccination again.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Germany , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Self Concept , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
5.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(3): 172-183, 2021 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291616

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presented unprecedented challenges to the provision of inpatient psychiatric care. The nature of the physical plant, programmatic constraints, and the patient population required a rapid and agile approach to problem-solving under conditions of uncertainty and stress. Flexibility in decision-making, excellent communication, an effective working relationship with infection prevention and control experts, and attention to staff morale and support were important elements of successful provision of care to our inpatients. We present our experience, lessons learned, and recommendations should a resurgence of the pandemic or a similar crisis occur.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Inpatients , Mental Disorders/therapy , Personnel, Hospital , Psychiatric Department, Hospital , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/standards , Psychiatric Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Psychiatric Department, Hospital/standards
6.
Br J Nurs ; 30(11): 634-642, 2021 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264690

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the mental health burden in healthcare workers caused by COVID-19 has gained increasing attention both within the profession and through public opinion, there has been a lack of data describing their experience; specifically, the mental wellbeing of healthcare workers in the intensive care unit (ICU), including those redeployed. AIMS: The authors aimed to compare the mental health status of ICU healthcare workers (physicians, nurses and allied health professionals) affected by various factors during the COVID-19 pandemic; and highlight to policymakers areas of staff vulnerabilities in order to improve wellbeing strategies within healthcare systems. METHODS: An online survey using three validated scales was conducted in France, the UK, Italy, Mainland China, Taiwan, Egypt and Belgium. FINDINGS: The proportion of respondents who screened positive on the three scales across the countries was 16-49% for depression, 60-86% for insomnia and 17-35% for post-traumatic stress disorder. The authors also identified an increase in the scores with longer time spent in personal protective equipment, female gender, advancing age and redeployed status. CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of mental disorders among ICU staff during the COVID-19 crisis should inform local and national wellbeing policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Intensive Care Units , Mental Disorders , Personnel, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Health Surveys , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
7.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(6): 746-750, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263424

ABSTRACT

A questionnaire was distributed to hospitals in Tokyo (N = 38) regarding their preparedness against and in-facility transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). As of May 31, 2020, 284 HCP had contracted COVID-19, and in-facility COVID-19 transmission occurred at 13 hospitals, negatively impacting hospital functions and patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/therapy , Cross Infection/transmission , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tokyo/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(2)2021 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231534

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia among hospital staff working in a tertiary care private hospital in India during the early period of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted May 5-25, 2020, among 347 hospital staff (nursing and other hospital staff, with the exception of doctors). Depression, anxiety, and insomnia were measured using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. RESULTS: Of respondents, 16.4% reported clinically significant depression, 13.8% reported clinically significant anxiety, and 13.3% reported insomnia. Among the nursing staff, 20.9% reported clinically significant depression, 15.9% reported clinically significant anxiety, and 17.0% reported insomnia. There was significantly higher depression (P = .000), anxiety (P = .002), and insomnia (P = .007) among nursing staff compared with other hospital staff in 2-tailed t tests. There was a significantly higher prevalence of insomnia among females (χ2 = 5.85, df = 2, P = .05). CONCLUSIONS: Study results show that more than 1 in 10 hospital staff suffer from mental health conditions, even during the beginning of the pandemic, and there is a need for active psychiatric support for the hospital staff during this pandemic. Depression, anxiety, and insomnia are significantly higher among nurses compared to other hospital staff. The results of this research suggest that comprehensive support measures should be implemented to protect and maintain mental health of hospital staff, especially nurses, while fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
9.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(4): 493-500, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has affected the hospital experience for patients, visitors, and staff. OBJECTIVE: To understand clinician perspectives on adaptations to end-of-life care for dying patients and their families during the pandemic. DESIGN: Mixed-methods embedded study. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04602520). SETTING: 3 acute care medical units in a tertiary care hospital from 16 March to 1 July 2020. PARTICIPANTS: 45 dying patients, 45 family members, and 45 clinicians. INTERVENTION: During the pandemic, clinicians continued an existing practice of collating personal information about dying patients and "what matters most," eliciting wishes, and implementing acts of compassion. MEASUREMENTS: Themes from semistructured clinician interviews that were summarized with representative quotations. RESULTS: Many barriers to end-of-life care arose because of infection control practices that mandated visiting restrictions and personal protective equipment, with attendant practical and psychological consequences. During hospitalization, family visits inside or outside the patient's room were possible for 36 patients (80.0%); 13 patients (28.9%) had virtual visits with a relative or friend. At the time of death, 20 patients (44.4%) had a family member at the bedside. Clinicians endeavored to prevent unmarked deaths by adopting advocacy roles to "fill the gap" of absent family and by initiating new and established ways to connect patients and relatives. LIMITATION: Absence of clinician symptom or wellness metrics; a single-center design. CONCLUSION: Clinicians expressed their humanity through several intentional practices to preserve personalized, compassionate end-of-life care for dying hospitalized patients during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Canadian Critical Care Trials Group Research Coordinator Fund.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Death , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family/psychology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Terminal Care/psychology , Aged , Empathy , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Geriatr Nurs ; 42(4): 787-791, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213243

ABSTRACT

The COVID 19 pandemic has led to an increase in the number of patients in need of ventilation. Limitations in the number of respirators may cause an ethical problem for the medical and nursing staff in deciding who should be connected to the available respirators.  We conducted a cross-sectional survey among a convenience sample of 278 healthcare professionals at one medical center. They were asked to rank their preference in respirator allocation to three COVID-19 patients, one 80 years old with no cognitive illness, one 50 years old with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and one 80 years old with AD. Most respondents (75%) chose the 80-year-old AD patient as last preference, but were evenly divided on how to rank the other two patients. Medical staff have difficulty deciding whether age or cognitive status should be the deciding factor ventilator allocation. Determination of a set policy would help professionals with these decisions.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Health Care Rationing/methods , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Ventilators, Mechanical , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Choice Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 71: 88-94, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213241

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have a sustained psychological impact on healthcare workers. We assessed individual characteristics related to changes in emotional exhaustion and psychological distress over time. METHODS: A survey of diverse hospital staff measured emotional exhaustion (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and psychological distress (K6) in Fall 2020 (T1) and Winter 2021 (T2). Relationships between occupational, personal, and psychological variables were assessed using repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: Of 539 T1 participants, 484 (89.9%) completed T2. Emotional exhaustion differed by occupational role (F = 7.3, p < .001; greatest in nurses), with increases over time in those with children (F = 8.5, p = .004) or elders (F = 4.0, p = .047). Psychological distress was inversely related to pandemic self-efficacy (F = 110.0, p < .001), with increases over time in those with children (F = 7.0, p = .008). Severe emotional exhaustion occurred in 41.1% (95%CI 36.6-45.4) at T1 and 49.8% (95%CI 45.4-54.2) at T2 (McNemar test p < .001). Psychological distress occurred in 9.7% (95%CI 7.1-12.2) at T1 and 11.6% (95%CI 8.8-14.4) at T2 (McNemar test p = .33). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers' psychological burden is high and rising as the pandemic persists. Ongoing support is warranted, especially for nurses and those with children and elders at home. Modifiable protective factors, restorative sleep and self-efficacy, merit special attention.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Family Characteristics , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Professional Role , Psychological Distress , Administrative Personnel/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Canada , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy , Sleep , Young Adult
12.
Adv Emerg Nurs J ; 43(2): 89-101, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207366

ABSTRACT

The Research to Practice column presents an analysis of current and controversial research findings with implications for practice change relevant to emergency care settings. This review critiques Johnson et al.'s (2016) investigation, titled "The Impact of Cognitive Stressors in the Emergency Department on Physician Implicit Racial Bias," that examined emergency department characteristics and stressors and their effects on physician racial bias and decision making. Their findings suggest that unconscious biases can affect clinical decisions when providers experience increased cognitive stress. The implications are significant for emergency providers as resources are especially strained during the COVID-19 pandemic and as the adverse effects of unconscious bias on health disparities and patient outcomes have become clearly apparent. Implicit bias training (IBT) is recommended for emergency providers and has significant implications for medical and nurse educators in executing and evaluating IBT outcomes.


Subject(s)
Emergency Service, Hospital , Nurse Practitioners/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Racism/psychology , Adult , Awareness , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Prejudice
13.
Healthc Q ; 24(1): 44-49, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190653

ABSTRACT

Pandemics are associated with heightened distress among healthcare workers (HCWs). We report qualitative findings from a two-stage survey administered to HCWs at a large acute care hospital in Ontario during the COVID-19 pandemic to identify their concerns and wellness needs. Responses reflected HCWs' desires to be heard, protected, prepared, supported and cared for by the organization. HCWs' concerns were diverse and dynamic, reflecting the specific circumstances of their work and personal lives as well as the shifting landscape of the pandemic. We discuss implications for organizations seeking to promote and protect HCWs' psychological well-being and resilience during pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/standards , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/standards , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
West J Emerg Med ; 22(2): 346-352, 2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183994

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created a mental health crisis among hospital staff who have been mentally and physically exhausted by uncertainty and unexpected stressors. However, the mental health challenges and complexities faced by hospital staff in the United States has not been fully elucidated. To address this gap, we conducted this study to examine the prevalence and correlates of depression and anxiety among hospital staff in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The design is a single-center, cross-sectional, online survey evaluating depression and anxiety among all hospital employees (n = 3,500) at a safety-net hospital with a moderate cumulative COVID-19 hospitalization rate between April 30-May 22, 2020. We assessed depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Anxiety was measured with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale. Logistic regression analyses were calculated to identify associations with depression and anxiety. RESULTS: Of 3,500 hospital employees, 1,246 (36%) responded to the survey. We included 1,232 individuals in the final analysis. Overall, psychological distress was common among the respondents: 21% and 33% of staff reported significant depression and anxiety, respectively, while 46% experienced overwhelming stress due to COVID-19. Notably, staff members overwhelmed by the stress of COVID-19 were seven and nine times more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety, respectively. In addition to stress, individuals with six to nine years of work experience were two times more likely to report moderate or severe depression compared to those with 10 or more years of work experience. Moreover, ancillary staff with direct patient contact (odds ratio [OR] 8.9, confidence interval (CI), 1.46, 173.03) as well as administrative and ancillary staff with indirect patient contact (OR 5.9, CI, 1.06, 111.01) were more likely to be depressed than physicians and advanced providers. CONCLUSION: We found that a considerable proportion of staff were suffering from psychological distress. COVID-19-associated depression and anxiety was widespread among hospital staff even in settings with comparatively lower COVID-19 hospitalization rates. Ancillary staff, administrative staff, staff with less job experience, and staff overwhelmed by the stress of COVID-19 are particularly susceptible to negative mental health outcomes. These findings will help inform hospital policymakers on best practices to develop interventions to reduce the mental health burden associated with COVID-19 in vulnerable hospital staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , California/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(2)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mealtimes occur six times a day on eating disorder (ED) inpatient units and are a mainstay of treatment for EDs. However, these are often distressing and anxiety provoking times for patients and staff. A product of patients' distress is an increase in ED behaviours specific to mealtimes. The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease the number of ED behaviours at mealtimes in the dining room through the implementation of initiatives identified through diagnostic work. METHODS: The Model for Improvement was used as the systematic approach for this project. Baseline assessment included observations in the dining room, gathering of qualitative feedback from staff and patients and the development of an ED behaviours form used by patients and staff. The first change idea of a host role in the dining room was introduced, and the impact was assessed. RESULTS: The introduction of the host role has reduced the average number of ED behaviours per patient in the dining room by 35%. Postintervention feedback demonstrated that the introduction of the host role tackled the disorganisation and chaotic feeling in the dining room which in turn has reduced distress and anxiety for patients and staff. CONCLUSIONS: This paper shows the realities of a quality improvement (QI) project on an ED inpatient unit during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results are positive for changes made; however, a large challenge, as described has been staff engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Food Service, Hospital/standards , Meals/psychology , Quality Improvement , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Behavior Observation Techniques , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Male , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology
16.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249609, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167121

ABSTRACT

This study aims at investigating the nature of resilience and stress experience of health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thirteen healthcare workers from Italian and Austrian hospitals specifically dealing with COVID-19 patients during the first phase of the pandemic were interviewed. Data was analysed using grounded theory methodology. Psychosocial effects on stress experience, stressors and resilience factors were identified. We generated three hypotheses. Hypothesis one is that moral distress and moral injury are main stressors experienced by healthcare workers. Hypothesis two states that organisational resilience plays an important part in how healthcare workers experience the crisis. Organisational justice and decentralized decision making are essential elements of staff wellbeing. Hypothesis three refers to effective psychosocial support: Basic on scene psychosocial support based on the Hobfoll principles given by trusted and well-known mental health professionals and peers in an integrated approach works best during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Austria , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Italy , Male , Morals , Pandemics , Psychosocial Support Systems , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
BMJ Open ; 11(4): e049996, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166516

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine whether engagement in COVID-19-related work was associated with an increased prevalence of depressive symptoms among the staff members working in a designated medical institution for COVID-19 in Tokyo, Japan. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: Data were obtained from a health survey conducted in July 2020 among the staff members of a designated medical institution for COVID-19 in Tokyo, Japan. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1228 hospital workers. EXPOSURE OF INTEREST: Engagement in COVID-19-related work (qualitatively (ie, the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection at work or affiliation to related departments) as well as quantitatively (ie, working hours)) and job categories. OUTCOME MEASURES: Depressive symptoms. RESULTS: There was no significant association between depressive symptoms and engagement in work with potential exposure to SARS-CoV-2 or affiliation to COVID-19-related departments. However, working for longer hours in March/April, when Japan witnessed a large number of infected cases, was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (≥11 hours/day: prevalence ratio (PR)=1.45, 95% CI=1.06 to 1.99, compared with ≤8 hours/day). Nurses were more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms than did doctors (PR=1.70, 95% CI=1.14 to 2.54). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection at work or having an affiliation to related departments might not be linked with a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms among Japanese hospital workers; contrarily, long working hours appeared to increase the prevalence of depressive symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tokyo/epidemiology
18.
Psychoneuroendocrinology ; 128: 105213, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164355

ABSTRACT

In the critical context of COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers are on the front line, participating directly in the care, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with COVID-19. This exposes them to a higher risk of developing chronic stress, psychological distress, and any other mental health symptoms. OBJECTIVE: to evaluate stress and burnout in a health workers population and, in addition, to measure hair cortisol concentration as a current biomarker of stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 234 health workers from Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín", Buenos Aires University, were included in this study. In this population hair samples were obtained from the posterior vertex as close to the scalp as possible and the individuals completed the following surveys: perceived stress, social support, burnout scale, life event scale, and sociodemographic data. Hair cortisol was measured by an automated chemiluminescent method. The studied population was divided into three groups considering those individuals below the healthy reference sample range (< 40 pg/mg hair), within the healthy reference range (40-128 pg/mg hair) and above the reference range (> 128 pg/mg hair). This study used a transversal and observational design. RESULTS: Our results show that 40% of the studied population presented hair cortisol values outside of the healthy reference range. In the whole studied population, a direct correlation was found between hair cortisol concentration and perceived stress as well as between hair cortisol concentration and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout (r = 0.142, p = 0.030; r = 0.143, p = 0.029, respectively). 12% of the studied population showed Burnout (52% doctors and residents, 19% nurses, 19% administrative personnel). Higher values in hair cortisol levels were found in the group with burnout versus individuals without burnout (p = 0.034). Finally, a mediation analysis was performed, finding that depersonalization is a mediating variable in the relationship between self-perceived stress and hair cortisol level (F = 4.86, p = 0.0086; indirect effect IC: 0.0987-1.8840). CONCLUSION: This is the first study in which a stress biomarker such as hair cortisol is evaluated in this population and in this context. Healthcare workers are subjected to increased levels of stress and burnout. High depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and decreased personal sense of accomplishment characterize this population. It is the responsibility of the health authorities to implement strategies to manage this psychological emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/metabolism , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Argentina/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/metabolism , Burnout, Professional/physiopathology , Female , Hair/chemistry , Health Care Surveys , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/physiopathology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
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