Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 101
Filter
1.
J Manag Care Spec Pharm ; 28(6): 667-672, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1876303

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The goal of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment is to cure the patient of the infection, defined as a nondetectable HCV RNA at least 12 weeks after treatment completion, or sustained virologic response (SVR). The COVID-19 pandemic has presented new barriers to care in the treatment of patients with HCV that resulted in a transition to tele-health services at many health systems to overcome these barriers. OBJECTIVE: To assess the real-world impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent shift to a telehealth model on collection of SVR data and other HCV treatment outcomes in a health-system setting. METHODS: Subjects who received a referral for an HCV direct-acting antiviral agent between January 1, 2018, and November 30, 2020, and were aged 18 years or older at time of enrollment were placed in either "pre-COVID-19" or "COVID-19" cohorts based on enrollment date. The primary endpoint of this study evaluated confirmed SVR to treatment determined by the absence of HCV RNA by polymerase chain reaction testing at least 12 weeks after completion of drug therapy. Secondary endpoints evaluated completion of medication therapy and adherence to laboratory appointments. RESULTS: 1,504 patients met study inclusion criteria (pre-COVID-19 cohort, n = 1,230; COVID-19 cohort, n = 274). The COVID-19 cohort demonstrated significantly lower therapy completion rates (P = 0.001), were less likely to obtain SVR laboratory tests (P < 0.001), and had a significantly lower confirmed SVR rate (P < 0.001) compared with the pre-COVID-19 cohort. In a subset of patients who completed therapy and had SVR laboratory tests collected, there were no significant differences observed in the rate of patients who achieved SVR (P = 0.959). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with HCV were significantly less likely to complete therapy or participate in SVR laboratory work. Further studies are needed to determine if offering a telehealth option for our patients in a post-COVID-19 environment would offer any additional advantage in increasing access to care for patients with HCV. DISCLOSURES: No outside funding supported this study. Dr Cooper is an employee of the University of Kentucky whose position was partially funded by Gilead Sciences, Inc.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis C, Chronic , Hepatitis C , Pharmacy , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Hepacivirus/genetics , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Hepatitis C, Chronic/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , RNA/therapeutic use
2.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 14(4): 521-525, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814295

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This wisdom of experience commentary, from peer academic reviewers serving on accreditation teams, will discuss benefits and challenges of international and national virtual accreditation visits (VAVs) using a "What? So What? Now What?" reflective model. DESCRIPTION: Onsite accreditation reviews for health professional education programs require investments in time, effort, and money to maintain program alignment with accreditation standards and continuously generate quality practitioners. When COVID-19 entered the accreditation world, reviewers had to pivot modalities to a VAV format. ANALYSIS/INTERPRETATION: Adaptation and expectations of VAVs present several challenges. Barriers and advantages will be discussed as well as implications for the future. While medical and pharmacy education standardization has long been established, the authors propose national and international accrediting bodies will utilize the ingenuity of emergency COVID-19-driven onsite accreditation alternatives to develop protocols for novel accreditation methodology. CONCLUSIONS: Whether the continued mutation of COVID-19 prevents the return to previous accreditation visits or not, the experiences gained from the emergency-driven VAV, can inform and enrich accrediting bodies knowledge, theories, and practices of future VAVs. IMPLICATIONS: Higher-education institutions, accreditation bodies, and government entities will use experiences during COVID-19 to transform and improve academic requirements and future practices. Even if there is a full return to onsite reviews, such guidelines or improved versions of them can be applied to situations where immobility or restricted mobility is an issue, such as in illness, pregnancy, travel, war, etc. It is crucial for educators and accrediting bodies to evolve as we navigate these unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmacies , Pharmacy , Accreditation/methods , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 14(4): 393-396, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814293

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The effects of COVID-19 will have a lasting impact on how work is conducted moving forward. Prior to the pandemic, work-life integration and well-being were priorities for many organizations, including pharmacy. The disruption associated with the COVID-19 pandemic pushed businesses and organizations worldwide into an era of agility and flexibility previously unknown to the majority of workplaces. PERSPECTIVE: Increased remote work has presented both increased challenges (e.g., engagement) and opportunities (e.g., productivity). After a year of experience, this shift in the nature of how work is done has provided an opportunity to reimagine how and where work will be conducted in the future. IMPLICATIONS: Schools and colleges of pharmacy have an opportunity to re-evaluate how academic and practice responsibilities are accomplished in regards to work life-integration and management of concurrent work and family responsibilities. Administration and faculty should foster a culture of transparency on this topic to collaboratively incorporate methods that better facilitate work-life integration moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmacy , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , Schools, Pharmacy
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(7): 2639-2645, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current COVID-19 pandemic has increased occupational stress for all healthcare providers, making job burnout one of the most common and largely unrecognized mental health issues among healthcare professionals. Besides physicians and nurses, pharmacy practitioners were "front-line" healthcare professionals with a critical and unique role in the public health crisis. Considering this, the aim of this study was to examine distress levels and the prevalence of job burnout among Serbian pharmacy practitioners in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional online study was conducted in April and May of 2020. A total of 176 pharmacy practitioners anonymously and voluntarily completed the two-section questionnaire, consisting of Copenhagen burnout inventory, CBI and 4DSQ Distress subscale. The two-section questionnaire was distributed online, among various social-media groups of pharmacy practitioners, as well as by personal contacts following the "snowball" sampling method. RESULTS: Results revealed moderately high burnout scores in our sample. The majority of the participants showed signs of personal-related job burnout, followed by work-related and client-related burnout. A strongly elevated distress level was obtained in almost two-thirds of study respondents. In addition, a significant and high correlation of all CBI subscales with distress was found, as well as medium correlations with sleep duration shortening as a mediator between distress and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Results of our study showed that job burnout significantly increased among pharmacy practitioners during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, we discovered that stress has an indirect impact on study participants' burnout via insufficient sleep.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Pharmacy , Psychological Distress , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Serbia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(8): e96, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795387

ABSTRACT

This article has been withdrawn due to a publisher error that caused the article to be duplicated. The definitive version of this article is published under DOI 10.1093/ajhp/zxab063.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Services , Pharmacy , Ambulatory Care , Humans , Pandemics
6.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 22(1): 99, 2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the health authorities recommended the implementation of strict social distancing and complete lockdown regulations to reduce disease spread. The pharmacists quickly adopted telemedicine (telepharmacy) as a solution against this crisis, but awareness about this technology is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to explore the patients' perspectives and preferences regarding telepharmacy instead of traditional in-person visits. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was designed and sent to 313 patients who were eligible for the study (from March to April 2021). The questionnaire used five-point Likert scales to inquire about motivations for adopting telepharmacy and in-person visits, their perceived advantages and disadvantages, and the declining factors of telepharmacy. Finally, the results were descriptively analyzed using SPSS 22. RESULTS: Of all 313 respondents, a total of 241 (77%) preferred appointments via telepharmacy while 72 (23%) preferred in-person services. There was a significant difference between the selection percentage of telepharmacy and in-person services (chi-square 91.42; p < 0.0001). Preference bout the telepharmacy system versus in-person visits to the pharmacy was associated with factors such as "reducing the incidence of contagious disease" (4.41; ± 0.78), "spending less time receiving pharmaceutical services" (4.24; ± 0.86)), and "traveling a shorter distance for receiving pharmaceutical services" (4.25; ± 0.86). "Reducing costs" (90.87%), "saving time" (89.21%), and "reducing the incidence of contagious disease" (87.13%) were the most important reasons for choosing telepharmacy services. Also, "face-to-face communication with the pharmacist" (25%), "low internet bandwidth" (25%), and "reduction of patients' anxiety and the increase of their peace of mind" (23.61%) were the most important reasons for choosing in-person visits. CONCLUSION: Survey data indicate that most participants are likely to prefer the use of telepharmacy, especially during crises such as the current COVID-19 pandemic. Telepharmacy can be applied as an important means and a crucial service to lessen the load on healthcare organizations and expand drug supply shelters in pharmacies. However, there are still substantial hurdles to overcome in order to successfully implement the telemedicine platform as part of mainstream practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Services , Pharmacies , Pharmacy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 467, 2022 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the wake of COVID-19, community pharmacists (CP) were called upon to free up healthcare providers to treat more serious conditions and alleviate overcrowded healthcare centers. CPs were placed under tremendous pressure, where many patients primarily sought their health advice. This situation raised concerns about the preparedness of CPs in facing these challenges. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the appropriateness of pharmaceutical care provided by CPs to patients with suspected COVID-19 and to investigate their communication skills. METHODS: A simulated patient (SP) study was conducted among randomly selected community pharmacies in Beirut, Lebanon. Each pharmacy was visited by the SP who complained of fever and loss of smell sensation. Interactions between the attending pharmacist and the suspected COVID-19 patient were documented directly after each visit in a standardized data collection form. RESULTS: More than half of the CPs (56%) did not retrieve any relevant information to assess the patient's condition. While pharmacists' responses were limited to one to two recommendations, with the majority recommending the patient to perform the PCR test (90%). Inappropriate recommendations made by the CPs included mainly the confirmation that the patient had COVID-19 without prior testing (9%), and prescribing either an antimicrobial drug (5%) or dietary supplements (20%), claiming that the latter are essential to boost the patient's immunity. As for the pharmacist-patient communication skills, the mean total score was 2.25 ± 0.79 (out of 4), displaying nonoptimal and ineffective communication. CONCLUSION: An unsatisfactory and suboptimal provision of pharmaceutical care to a suspected COVID-19 case was evident. This may be a public health threat, particularly for developing countries that lack an efficient and unified healthcare system. The findings should alert health authorities to support and guide community pharmacists in assisting suspected COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community Pharmacy Services , Pharmacies , Pharmacy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Pharmacists , Professional Role
9.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(8): e96, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774337

ABSTRACT

This article has been withdrawn due to a publisher error that caused the article to be duplicated. The definitive version of this article is published under DOI 10.1093/ajhp/zxab063.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Services , Pharmacy , Ambulatory Care , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(13): 1023-1024, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774341
11.
Int J Clin Pharm ; 44(3): 775-780, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1772977

ABSTRACT

Pharmacists now face the biggest challenges in the history of the profession: the use of digital technologies in pharmacy practice and education and the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019. Worldwide, pharmaceutical care and pharmacy education via digital technologies have significantly increased and will be incorporated into patient care and the teaching-learning process, respectively. Thus, in this new era of pharmacy practice and education, curricula should promote the development of specific competencies for the cognitive, conscious, and effective use of digital tools. This requires the training of "disruptive" educators, who are capable of using teaching-learning methods adapted to the digital environment and educational processes suitable for stimulating the use of effective disruptive technologies. This commentary argues that the pharmacy profession can no longer wait for the slow integration of digital technologies into pharmacy practice and education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Pharmacy , Pharmaceutical Services , Pharmacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pharmacists/psychology
13.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(4): 820-827, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760183

ABSTRACT

We analyzed a pharmacy dataset to assess the 20% decline in tuberculosis (TB) cases reported to the US National Tuberculosis Surveillance System (NTSS) during the coronavirus disease pandemic in 2020 compared with the 2016-2019 average. We examined the correlation between TB medication dispensing data to TB case counts in NTSS and used a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model to predict expected 2020 counts. Trends in the TB medication data were correlated with trends in NTSS data during 2006-2019. There were fewer prescriptions and cases in 2020 than would be expected on the basis of previous trends. This decrease was particularly large during April-May 2020. These data are consistent with NTSS data, suggesting that underreporting is not occurring but not ruling out underdiagnosis or actual decline. Understanding the mechanisms behind the 2020 decline in reported TB cases will help TB programs better prepare for postpandemic cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmacy , Tuberculosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Population Surveillance , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Tuberculosis/drug therapy , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
15.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(13): 1079-1085, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758628

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The study's purpose was to measure the impact of anti-reflux needleless connector usage in prevention of intraluminal thrombotic occlusions among central venous catheters, as represented by alteplase usage, in a home infusion patient population. METHODS: An18-month before-and-after cohort study of a single home infusion intervention was conducted to compare occlusion outcomes with use of two types of needleless connectors-neutral and anti-reflux-in preventing catheter occlusions, which have been reported to occur in 28% of home infusion patients, resulting in treatment delays, increased nursing encounters and emergency room visits, and higher overall pharmacy costs for supplies and alteplase. RESULTS: A total of 552,707 patient therapy days were studied: 42.5% in the neutral needleless connector group (n = 235,004 therapy days) and 57.5% in the anti-reflux needleless connector group (n = 317,703 therapy days). The rate of alteplase usage with neutral versus anti-reflux needleless connectors was 4.4% versus 2.2% per 1,000 therapy days, with median alteplase use of 112 (95% CI, 89-169) units versus 82 (95% CI, 68-109) units (P < 0.001). Implementation of anti-reflux connectors reduced occlusions and alteplase usage by 48%. CONCLUSION: Statistical evidence demonstrated that use of anti-reflux needleless connectors with central venous access devices reduced the need for alteplase in the study population. Since 10% of patient occlusions were within 7 days after home infusion admission, future research may indicate that placement of anti-reflux needleless connectors at the time of in-hospital insertion can improve patient outcomes. This quality improvement measure reduced central catheter occlusions, alteplase costs, and the number of required nursing and emergency room visits.


Subject(s)
Catheterization, Central Venous , Pharmacy , Catheterization, Central Venous/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Quality Improvement , Tissue Plasminogen Activator
16.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(13): 1096-1102, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740802

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To address gender inequality, the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) created a steering committee that recommended the collection of baseline and ongoing metrics of pharmacy leadership. The purpose of this study was to quantify gender inequality in distributions of residency program director (RPD) and director of pharmacy (DOP) positions and to investigate gender distributions among recipients of ASHP professional leadership awards. METHODS: RPD and DOP information for postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) programs included in the online ASHP residency directory were collected in December of 2020. Publicly available records were used to collect information on recipients of the Harvey A.K. Whitney Award and John W. Webb Award during the periods 1950-2020 and 1985-2020, respectively. Gender information for RPDs, DOPs, and award recipients was collected from listed pronouns available in public records. A χ 2 test was used for analysis of the collected data. RESULTS: A total of 1,176 PGY1 residency programs were included. Of the RPD positions assessed, 66% (n = 775) were filled by women pharmacists (P < 0.0001), while the percentage of DOP leadership positions held by women was 42% (n = 496) (P < 0.0001). Evaluation of data on recipients of the Harvey A.K. Whitney Award and John W. Webb Award revealed the occurrence of female recipients is 19.7% (n = 14) and 16.7% (n = 6), respectively (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: RPD positions have a higher prevalence of being filled by women. DOP positions remain male-dominated and revealed gender inequality among senior-level leadership roles. Pharmacy leadership award analysis identified further gender inequality. The results from the study serve as a baseline of current gender metrics for pharmacy leaderships in hospital systems with PGY1 residency programs.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , Internship and Residency , Pharmacy Residencies , Pharmacy , Female , Humans , Leadership , Male , United States
18.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(13): 1070-1078, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730641

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify and build consensus on operational tasks that occur within a health-system pharmacy. METHODS: An expert panel of 8 individuals was invited to participate in a 3-round modified Delphi process. In the first round, the expert panel independently reviewed an initial list and provided feedback. All feedback was incorporated into the second round and then reviewed and discussed as a group. The expert panel reviewed an updated list based on feedback from the second round and reached consensus on a final list of operational processes and corresponding tasks. RESULTS: All 8 participants agreed to serve on the Delphi expert panel and reviewed an initial list of 9 process categories (hazardous intravenous [IV] medications, nonhazardous IV medications, hazardous oral medications, nonhazardous oral medications, controlled substances, total parenteral nutrition [TPN]/fluid preparations, distribution and delivery, clinical tasks, and miscellaneous operational tasks) and 44 corresponding tasks. Through the Delphi process, 72 new tasks were identified in the first round, while 34 new tasks were identified in the second round. In the third and final round, the expert panel reviewed the updated list of 9 process categories and 150 corresponding tasks, made additional edits, and reached consensus on a final list of 9 processes and 138 corresponding tasks that represented operational work within a health-system pharmacy. CONCLUSION: The modified Delphi process effectively identified operational processes and corresponding tasks occurring within hospital pharmacies in a diverse health system. This process facilitated consensus building, and the findings may inform development of an operational workload model.


Subject(s)
Pharmaceutical Services , Pharmacies , Pharmacy , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans
19.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 14(2): 145-152, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707742

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To describe the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on teaching, research, practice, and work-life integration for pharmacy faculty at research-intensive institutions. METHODS: An online survey related to transition to remote work, impact on faculty responsibilities, demographics, and other elements was sent to nine research-intensive United States public schools/colleges of pharmacy. Respondents were asked to describe challenges in moving to remote instruction as a result of the pandemic. The 75-item survey asked respondents to rate the degree to which factors were challenging and levels of concern with the abrupt transition. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and comparison of means using paired samples t-tests between spring and fall semesters, for the types of students taught, and for faculty discipline. RESULTS: Surveys were completed by 279 faculty (36% response rate), with 62% self-identifying as pharmacy practice faculty. The highest reported challenges were family/home responsibilities (41%), assisting children with schoolwork (28%), and availability of childcare (22%). Concerns most identified by respondents were increased workload, potential for academic dishonesty, and inability to effectively conduct hands-on activities. Practice faculty encountered barriers using telehealth and delivering virtual experiential education, while both practice and research faculty reported concerns with research progress. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has led to substantial challenges and increased workload in many areas. As the pandemic persists, administration should consider reported barriers and concerns to inform expectations. Evaluation of novel instructional design, assessment methods, and best practices in the virtual learning environment is highly encouraged to ensure student competencies are met.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Pharmacy , Pharmacy , Child , Education, Pharmacy/methods , Faculty , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Pharmacy , United States
20.
Eur J Hosp Pharm ; 29(2): 63-64, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707684
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL