Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 261
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
2.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 86-102, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1529016

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunological markers have been described during COVID-19 and persist after recovery. These immune markers are associated with clinical features among SARSCoV-2 infected individuals. Nevertheless, studies reporting a comprehensive analysis of the immune changes occurring during SARS-CoV-2 infection are still limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the antibody response, and the phenotype and function of NK cells and T cells in a Colombian family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA. The frequency, phenotype, and function of NK cells (cocultures with K562 cells) and T-cells (stimulated with spike/RdRp peptides) were assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralization assay. RESULTS: During COVID-19, we observed a high proinflammatory-cytokine production and a reduced CD56bright-NK cell and cytotoxic response. Compared with healthy controls, infected individuals had a higher frequency of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells CD38+HLA-DR-. During the acute phase, CD8+ T cells stimulated with viral peptides exhibited a monofunctional response characterized by high IL-10 production. However, during recovery, we observed a bifunctional response characterized by the co-expression of CD107a and granzyme B or perforin. CONCLUSION: Although the proinflammatory response is a hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection, other phenotypic and functional alterations in NK cells and CD8+ T cells could be associated with the outcome of COVID-19. However, additional studies are required to understand these alterations and to guide future immunotherapy strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , CD56 Antigen/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Colombia , Family Health , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, CCR7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
4.
Elife ; 102021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513055

ABSTRACT

Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate processes ranging from antitumor and antiviral immunity to host-microbe communication at mucosal surfaces. It remains difficult, however, to genetically manipulate human DCs, limiting our ability to probe how DCs elicit specific immune responses. Here, we develop a CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing method for human monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) that mediates knockouts with a median efficiency of >94% across >300 genes. Using this method, we perform genetic screens in moDCs, identifying mechanisms by which DCs tune responses to lipopolysaccharides from the human microbiome. In addition, we reveal donor-specific responses to lipopolysaccharides, underscoring the importance of assessing immune phenotypes in donor-derived cells, and identify candidate genes that control this specificity, highlighting the potential of our method to pinpoint determinants of inter-individual variation in immunity. Our work sets the stage for a systematic dissection of the immune signaling at the host-microbiome interface and for targeted engineering of DCs for neoantigen vaccination.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Associated Protein 9/genetics , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Gene Editing , Genomics , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron/immunology , CRISPR-Associated Protein 9/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Phenotype , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptor 4/agonists , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e051209, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495465

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The conceptualisation of healthy ageing phenotype (HAP) and the availability of a tentative panel for HAP biomarkers raise the need to test the efficacy of potential interventions to promote health in older adults. This study protocol reports the methodology for a 24-week programme to explore the holistic influence of the yoga-based intervention on the (bio)markers of HAP. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study is a two-armed, randomised waitlist controlled trial with blinded outcome assessors and multiple primary outcomes. We aim to recruit 250 subjects, aged 60-80 years from the residential communities and old age clubs in Bangalore city, India, who will undergo randomisation into intervention or control arms (1:1). The intervention will include a yoga-based programme tailored for the older adults, 1 hour per day for 6 days a week, spread for 24 weeks. Data would be collected at the baseline and post-intervention, the 24th week. The multiple primary outcomes of the study are the (bio)markers of HAP: glycated haemoglobin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s for physiological and metabolic health; Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Trail Making Tests A and B for cognition; hand grip strength and gait speed for physical capability; loneliness for social well-being and WHO Quality of Life Instrument-Short Form for quality of life. The secondary outcomes include inflammatory markers, tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor II, C reactive protein, interleukin 6 and serum Klotho levels. Analyses will be by intention-to-treat and the holistic impact of yoga on HAP will be assessed using global statistical test. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana University, Bangalore (ID: RES/IEC-SVYASA/143/2019). Written informed consent will be obtained from each participant prior to inclusion. Results will be available through research articles and conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CTRI/2021/02/031373.


Subject(s)
Healthy Aging , Yoga , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Hand Strength , Health Promotion , Humans , India , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 249, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For some SARS-CoV-2 survivors, recovery from the acute phase of the infection has been grueling with lingering effects. Many of the symptoms characterized as the post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC) could have multiple causes or are similarly seen in non-COVID patients. Accurate identification of PASC phenotypes will be important to guide future research and help the healthcare system focus its efforts and resources on adequately controlled age- and gender-specific sequelae of a COVID-19 infection. METHODS: In this retrospective electronic health record (EHR) cohort study, we applied a computational framework for knowledge discovery from clinical data, MLHO, to identify phenotypes that positively associate with a past positive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for COVID-19. We evaluated the post-test phenotypes in two temporal windows at 3-6 and 6-9 months after the test and by age and gender. Data from longitudinal diagnosis records stored in EHRs from Mass General Brigham in the Boston Metropolitan Area was used for the analyses. Statistical analyses were performed on data from March 2020 to June 2021. Study participants included over 96 thousand patients who had tested positive or negative for COVID-19 and were not hospitalized. RESULTS: We identified 33 phenotypes among different age/gender cohorts or time windows that were positively associated with past SARS-CoV-2 infection. All identified phenotypes were newly recorded in patients' medical records 2 months or longer after a COVID-19 RT-PCR test in non-hospitalized patients regardless of the test result. Among these phenotypes, a new diagnosis record for anosmia and dysgeusia (OR 2.60, 95% CI [1.94-3.46]), alopecia (OR 3.09, 95% CI [2.53-3.76]), chest pain (OR 1.27, 95% CI [1.09-1.48]), chronic fatigue syndrome (OR 2.60, 95% CI [1.22-2.10]), shortness of breath (OR 1.41, 95% CI [1.22-1.64]), pneumonia (OR 1.66, 95% CI [1.28-2.16]), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR 1.41, 95% CI [1.22-1.64]) is one of the most significant indicators of a past COVID-19 infection. Additionally, more new phenotypes were found with increased confidence among the cohorts who were younger than 65. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study confirm many of the post-COVID-19 symptoms and suggest that a variety of new diagnoses, including new diabetes mellitus and neurological disorder diagnoses, are more common among those with a history of COVID-19 than those without the infection. Additionally, more than 63% of PASC phenotypes were observed in patients under 65 years of age, pointing out the importance of vaccination to minimize the risk of debilitating post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 among younger adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Phenotype , Retrospective Studies
7.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 99-114, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496673

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is characterized by the alternative-pathway (AP) hyperactivation induced by nephritic factors or complement gene mutations. Mice deficient in complement factor H (CFH) are a classic C3G model, with kidney disease that requires several months to progress to renal failure. Novel C3G models can further contribute to understanding the mechanism behind this disease and developing therapeutic approaches. METHODS: A novel, rapidly progressing, severe, murine model of C3G was developed by replacing the mouse C3 gene with the human C3 homolog using VelociGene technology. Functional, histologic, molecular, and pharmacologic assays characterize the presentation of renal disease and enable useful pharmacologic interventions in the humanized C3 (C3hu/hu) mice. RESULTS: The C3hu/hu mice exhibit increased morbidity early in life and die by about 5-6 months of age. The C3hu/hu mice display elevated biomarkers of kidney dysfunction, glomerulosclerosis, C3/C5b-9 deposition, and reduced circulating C3 compared with wild-type mice. Administration of a C5-blocking mAb improved survival rate and offered functional and histopathologic benefits. Blockade of AP activation by anti-C3b or CFB mAbs also extended survival and preserved kidney function. CONCLUSIONS: The C3hu/hu mice are a useful model for C3G because they share many pathologic features consistent with the human disease. The C3G phenotype in C3hu/hu mice may originate from a dysregulated interaction of human C3 protein with multiple mouse complement proteins, leading to unregulated C3 activation via AP. The accelerated disease course in C3hu/hu mice may further enable preclinical studies to assess and validate new therapeutics for C3G.


Subject(s)
Complement C3/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative/genetics , Kidney Diseases/genetics , Animals , Complement C3/metabolism , Complement Pathway, Alternative/genetics , Exons , Gene Expression Regulation , Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative/metabolism , Humans , Kidney Diseases/metabolism , Liver/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Microscopy, Fluorescence , Phenotype , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Renal Insufficiency/genetics , Renal Insufficiency/metabolism
8.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 41-51, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mutations in PKD1 and PKD2, which encode the transmembrane proteins polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, respectively, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Polycystins are expressed in the primary cilium, and disrupting cilia structure significantly slows ADPKD progression following inactivation of polycystins. The cellular mechanisms of polycystin- and cilia-dependent cyst progression in ADPKD remain incompletely understood. METHODS: Unbiased transcriptional profiling in an adult-onset Pkd2 mouse model before cysts formed revealed significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in Pkd2 single-knockout kidneys, which were used to identify candidate pathways dysregulated in kidneys destined to form cysts. In vivo studies validated the role of the candidate pathway in the progression of ADPKD. Wild-type and Pkd2/Ift88 double-knockout mice that are protected from cyst growth served as controls. RESULTS: The RNASeq data identified cell proliferation as the most dysregulated pathway, with 15 of 241 DEGs related to cell cycle functions. Cdk1 appeared as a central component in this analysis. Cdk1 expression was similarly dysregulated in Pkd1 models of ADPKD, and conditional inactivation of Cdk1 with Pkd1 markedly improved the cystic phenotype and kidney function compared with inactivation of Pkd1 alone. The Pkd1/Cdk1 double knockout blocked cyst cell proliferation that otherwise accompanied Pkd1 inactivation alone. CONCLUSIONS: Dysregulation of Cdk1 is an early driver of cyst cell proliferation in ADPKD due to Pkd1 inactivation. Selective targeting of cyst cell proliferation is an effective means of slowing ADPKD progression caused by inactivation of Pkd1.


Subject(s)
CDC2 Protein Kinase/metabolism , Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant/genetics , Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant/metabolism , TRPP Cation Channels/metabolism , Animals , Apoptosis , CDC2 Protein Kinase/genetics , Catalytic Domain , Cell Proliferation , Crosses, Genetic , DNA Replication , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mutation , Phenotype , Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Acetyl-Transferring Kinase/genetics , RNA-Seq , TRPP Cation Channels/genetics , Transcription, Genetic , Whole Exome Sequencing
9.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 115-126, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496665

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of ESKD in the United States, identifying those patients who progress to ESKD is difficult. Efforts are under way to determine if plasma biomarkers can help identify these high-risk individuals. METHODS: In our case-cohort study of 894 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study participants with diabetes and an eGFR of <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline, participants were randomly selected for the subcohort; cases were those patients who developed progressive diabetic kidney disease (ESKD or 40% eGFR decline). Using a multiplex system, we assayed plasma biomarkers related to tubular injury, inflammation, and fibrosis (KIM-1, TNFR-1, TNFR-2, MCP-1, suPAR, and YKL-40). Weighted Cox regression models related biomarkers to progression of diabetic kidney disease, and mixed-effects models estimated biomarker relationships with rate of eGFR change. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Higher concentrations of KIM-1, TNFR-1, TNFR-2, MCP-1, suPAR, and YKL-40 were each associated with a greater risk of progression of diabetic kidney disease, even after adjustment for established clinical risk factors. After accounting for competing biomarkers, KIM-1, TNFR-2, and YKL-40 remained associated with progression of diabetic kidney disease; TNFR-2 had the highest risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.26). KIM-1, TNFR-1, TNFR-2, and YKL-40 were associated with rate of eGFR decline. CONCLUSIONS: Higher plasma levels of KIM-1, TNFR-1, TNFR-2, MCP-1, suPAR, and YKL-40 were associated with increased risk of progression of diabetic kidney disease; TNFR-2 had the highest risk after accounting for the other biomarkers. These findings validate previous literature on TNFR-1, TNFR-2, and KIM-1 in patients with prevalent CKD and provide new insights into the influence of suPAR and YKL-40 as plasma biomarkers that require validation.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Diabetic Nephropathies/genetics , Kidney Failure, Chronic/genetics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/genetics , Adult , Aged , Chemokine CCL2/blood , Chitinase-3-Like Protein 1/blood , Cohort Studies , Diabetic Nephropathies/blood , Disease Progression , Female , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1/blood , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Prevalence , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I/blood , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/blood , Risk , Young Adult
10.
mBio ; 11(2)2020 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452919

ABSTRACT

Obesity is associated with increased disease severity, elevated viral titers in exhaled breath, and significantly prolonged viral shed during influenza A virus infection. Due to the mutable nature of RNA viruses, we questioned whether obesity could also influence influenza virus population diversity. Here, we show that minor variants rapidly emerge in obese mice. The variants exhibit increased viral replication, resulting in enhanced virulence in wild-type mice. The increased diversity of the viral population correlated with decreased type I interferon responses, and treatment of obese mice with recombinant interferon reduced viral diversity, suggesting that the delayed antiviral response exhibited in obesity permits the emergence of a more virulent influenza virus population. This is not unique to obese mice. Obesity-derived normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells also showed decreased interferon responses and increased viral replication, suggesting that viral diversity also was impacted in this increasing population.IMPORTANCE Currently, 50% of the adult population worldwide is overweight or obese. In these studies, we demonstrate that obesity not only enhances the severity of influenza infection but also impacts viral diversity. The altered microenvironment associated with obesity supports a more diverse viral quasispecies and affords the emergence of potentially pathogenic variants capable of inducing greater disease severity in lean hosts. This is likely due to the impaired interferon response, which is seen in both obese mice and obesity-derived human bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting that obesity, aside from its impact on influenza virus pathogenesis, permits the stochastic accumulation of potentially pathogenic viral variants, raising concerns about its public health impact as the prevalence of obesity continues to rise.


Subject(s)
Disease Susceptibility , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/etiology , Obesity/complications , Animals , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Mice , Mutation , Phenotype , RNA, Viral , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Virulence , Virus Replication
11.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(21)2021 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488706

ABSTRACT

The speed and accuracy of phenotype detection from medical images are some of the most important qualities needed for any informed and timely response such as early detection of cancer or detection of desirable phenotypes for animal breeding. To improve both these qualities, the world is leveraging artificial intelligence and machine learning against this challenge. Most recently, deep learning has successfully been applied to the medical field to improve detection accuracies and speed for conditions including cancer and COVID-19. In this study, we applied deep neural networks, in the form of a generative adversarial network (GAN), to perform image-to-image processing steps needed for ovine phenotype analysis from CT scans of sheep. Key phenotypes such as gigot geometry and tissue distribution were determined using a computer vision (CV) pipeline. The results of the image processing using a trained GAN are strikingly similar (a similarity index of 98%) when used on unseen test images. The combined GAN-CV pipeline was able to process and determine the phenotypes at a speed of 0.11 s per medical image compared to approximately 30 min for manual processing. We hope this pipeline represents the first step towards automated phenotype extraction for ovine genetic breeding programmes.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19 , Animals , Computers , Humans , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2 , Sheep
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20864, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479817

ABSTRACT

Following SARS-CoV-2 infection, some COVID-19 patients experience severe host driven adverse events. To treat these complications, their underlying etiology and drug treatments must be identified. Thus, a novel AI methodology MOATAI-VIR, which predicts disease-protein-pathway relationships and repurposed FDA-approved drugs to treat COVID-19's clinical manifestations was developed. SARS-CoV-2 interacting human proteins and GWAS identified respiratory failure genes provide the input from which the mode-of-action (MOA) proteins/pathways of the resulting disease comorbidities are predicted. These comorbidities are then mapped to their clinical manifestations. To assess each manifestation's molecular basis, their prioritized shared proteins were subject to global pathway analysis. Next, the molecular features associated with hallmark COVID-19 phenotypes, e.g. unusual neurological symptoms, cytokine storms, and blood clots were explored. In practice, 24/26 of the major clinical manifestations are successfully predicted. Three major uncharacterized manifestation categories including neoplasms are also found. The prevalence of neoplasms suggests that SARS-CoV-2 might be an oncovirus due to shared molecular mechanisms between oncogenesis and viral replication. Then, repurposed FDA-approved drugs that might treat COVID-19's clinical manifestations are predicted by virtual ligand screening of the most frequent comorbid protein targets. These drugs might help treat both COVID-19's severe adverse events and lesser ones such as loss of taste/smell.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computational Biology/methods , Neoplasms/complications , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Thrombosis/complications , Virus Replication , Benchmarking , Comorbidity , Computer Simulation , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Discovery , Humans , Machine Learning , Molecular Medicine , Phenotype , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
13.
Abdom Radiol (NY) ; 46(11): 5095-5104, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465846

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess inter-reader agreement of key features from the SAR-AGA recommendations for the interpretation and reporting of MRE in adult patients with CD, focusing on the impact of radiologist experience on inter-reader agreement of CD phenotypes. METHODS: Two experienced and two less-experienced radiologists retrospectively evaluated 99 MRE in CD patients (50 initial MRE, 49 follow-up MRE) performed from 1/1/2019 to 3/20/2020 for the presence of active bowel inflammation (stomach, proximal small bowel, ileum, colon), stricture, probable stricture, penetrating disease, and perianal disease. The MRE protocol did not include dedicated perianal sequences. Inter-rater agreement was determined for each imaging feature using prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa and compared by experience level. RESULTS: All readers had almost-perfect inter-reader agreement (κ > 0.90) for penetrating disease, abscess, and perianal abscess in all 99 CD patients. All readers had strong inter-reader agreement (κ: 0.80-0.90) in 99 CD patients for active ileum inflammation, proximal small bowel inflammation, and stricture. Less-experienced readers had significantly lower inter-reader agreement for active ileum inflammation on initial than follow-up MRE (κ 0.68 versus 0.96, p = 0.018) and for strictures on follow-up than initial MRE (κ 0.76 versus 1.0, p = 0.027). Experienced readers had significantly lower agreement for perianal fistula on follow-up than initial MRE (κ: 0.55 versus 0.92, p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: There was strong to almost-perfect inter-reader agreement for key CD phenotypes described in the SAR-AGA consensus recommendations including active ileum and proximal small bowel inflammation, stricture, penetrating disease, abscess, and perianal abscess. Areas of lower inter-reader agreement could be targeted for future education efforts to further standardize CD MRE reporting. Dedicated perianal sequences should be included on follow-up MRE.


Subject(s)
Crohn Disease , Radiology , Adult , Consensus , Crohn Disease/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Observer Variation , Phenotype , Radiologists , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , United States
14.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 50(9): 686-694, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464249

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 is associated with a high mortality rate, though outcomes of the different lung compliance phenotypes are unclear. We aimed to measure lung compliance and examine other factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 patients with ARDS. METHODS: Adult patients with COVID-19 ARDS who required invasive mechanical ventilation at 8 hospitals in Singapore were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with both mortality and differences between high (<40mL/cm H2O) and low (<40mL/cm H2O) compliance were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients with COVID-19 who required invasive mechanical ventilation were analysed; 15 (14.7%) did not survive. Non-survivors were older (median 70 years, interquartile range [IQR] 67-75 versus median 61 years, IQR 52-66; P<0.01), and required a longer duration of ventilation (26 days, IQR 12-27 vs 8 days, IQR 5-15; P<0.01) and intensive care unit support (26 days, IQR 11-30 vs 11.5 days, IQR 7-17.3; P=0.01), with a higher incidence of acute kidney injury (15 patients [100%] vs 40 patients [46%]; P<0.01). There were 67 patients who had lung compliance data; 24 (35.8%) were classified as having high compliance and 43 (64.2%) as having low compliance. Mortality was higher in patients with high compliance (33.3% vs 11.6%; P=0.03), and was associated with a drop in compliance at day 7 (-9.3mL/cm H2O (IQR -4.5 to -15.4) vs 0.2mL/cm H2O (4.7 to -5.2) P=0.04). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 ARDS patients with higher compliance on the day of intubation and a longitudinal decrease over time had a higher risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Lung Compliance , Phenotype , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 748566, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463474

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains a major health challenge globally. Previous studies have suggested that changes in the glycosylation of IgG are closely associated with the severity of COVID-19. This study aimed to compare the profiles of IgG N-glycome between COVID-19 patients and healthy controls. A case-control study was conducted, in which 104 COVID-19 patients and 104 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were recruited. Serum IgG N-glycome composition was analyzed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with the ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (HILIC-UPLC) approach. COVID-19 patients have a decreased level of IgG fucosylation, which upregulates antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) in acute immune responses. In severe cases, a low level of IgG sialylation contributes to the ADCC-regulated enhancement of inflammatory cytokines. The decreases in sialylation and galactosylation play a role in COVID-19 pathogenesis via the activation of the lectin-initiated alternative complement pathway. IgG N-glycosylation underlines the complex clinical phenotypes of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity , Case-Control Studies , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Complement Pathway, Mannose-Binding Lectin , Female , Glycosylation , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype
16.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211048567, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463208

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had become a worldwide health threat. Early prediction of the severity of COVID-19 patients was important for reducing death rate and controlling this disease. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 301 patients confirmed with COVID-19 in Wuhan from 8 February to 10 April 2020 were included. Clinical data were collected and analyzed. Diagnostic and prognostic utility of blood cell counts and lymphocyte subsets in COVID-19 patients were investigated. The receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC) was used in discriminating the mild and severe/critical cases. RESULTS: There were difference in blood cell counts and lymphocyte subsets among mild, severe and critical patients, which were also influenced by comorbidities and duration of disease. The area under the ROC of lymphocyte, CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells were 0.718, 0.721, 0.718, and 0.670, which were higher than that of other hematological parameters. The optimal threshold was 1205, 691, 402, and 177 per µl, respectively. Patients with higher counts of lymphocyte, CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+ T cells were correlated with shorter length of stay in hospital (p < 0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed disease severity, CD3+ T cells counts and time when the nucleic acid turned negative were independent risk factors for in-hospital death of COVID-19 patients (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Blood cell counts and lymphocyte subsets correlated with severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , China , Female , Hospital Mortality , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Young Adult
17.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5839, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454764

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need to understand the nature of immune responses against SARS-CoV-2, to inform risk-mitigation strategies for people living with HIV (PLWH). Here we show that the majority of PLWH with ART suppressed HIV viral load, mount a detectable adaptive immune response to SARS-CoV-2. Humoral and SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell responses are comparable between HIV-positive and negative subjects and persist 5-7 months following predominately mild COVID-19 disease. T cell responses against Spike, Membrane and Nucleoprotein are the most prominent, with SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4 T cells outnumbering CD8 T cells. We further show that the overall magnitude of SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell responses relates to the size of the naive CD4 T cell pool and the CD4:CD8 ratio in PLWH. These findings suggest that inadequate immune reconstitution on ART, could hinder immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 with implications for the individual management and vaccine effectiveness in PLWH.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections/immunology , HIV Infections/virology , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Genome, Human , HIV Infections/blood , Humans , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Species Specificity , Tissue Donors
18.
Theor Appl Genet ; 134(9): 3083-3109, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453686

ABSTRACT

KEY MESSAGE: Based on the large-scale integration of meta-QTL and Genome-Wide  Association Study, 76 high-confidence MQTL regions and 237 candidate genes that affected wheat yield and yield-related traits were discovered. Improving yield and yield-related traits are key goals in wheat breeding program. The integration of accumulated wheat genetic resources provides an opportunity to uncover important genomic regions and candidate genes that affect wheat yield. Here, a comprehensive meta-QTL analysis was conducted on 2230 QTL of yield-related traits obtained from 119 QTL studies. These QTL were refined into 145 meta-QTL (MQTL), and 89 MQTL were verified by GWAS with different natural populations. The average confidence interval (CI) of these MQTL was 2.92 times less than that of the initial QTL. Furthermore, 76 core MQTL regions with a physical distance less than 25 Mb were detected. Based on the homology analysis and expression patterns, 237 candidate genes in the MQTL involved in photoperiod response, grain development, multiple plant growth regulator pathways, carbon and nitrogen metabolism and spike and flower organ development were determined. A novel candidate gene TaKAO-4A was confirmed to be significantly associated with grain size, and a CAPS marker was developed based on its dominant haplotype. In summary, this study clarified a method based on the integration of meta-QTL, GWAS and homology comparison to reveal the genomic regions and candidate genes that affect important yield-related traits in wheat. This work will help to lay a foundation for the identification, transfer and aggregation of these important QTL or candidate genes in wheat high-yield breeding.


Subject(s)
Chromosomes, Plant/genetics , Edible Grain/genetics , Genome, Plant , Genome-Wide Association Study , Plant Proteins/metabolism , Quantitative Trait Loci , Triticum/genetics , Chromosome Mapping/methods , Edible Grain/growth & development , Gene Expression Regulation, Plant , Phenotype , Plant Breeding , Plant Proteins/genetics , Triticum/growth & development
19.
Heart Vessels ; 35(10): 1349-1359, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451965

ABSTRACT

Fractional flow reserve (FFR) assessed during adenosine-induced maximal hyperemia has emerged as a useful tool for the guidance of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However, interindividual variability in the response to adenosine has been claimed as a major limitation to the use of adenosine for the measurement of FFR, carrying the risk of underestimating the severity of coronary stenoses, with potential negative prognostic consequences. Genetic variants of the adenosine receptor A2a (ADORA2A gene), located in the coronary circulation, have been involved in the modulation of the hyperemic response to adenosine. However, no study has so far evaluated the impact of the single nucleotide polymorphism rs5751876 of ADORA2A on the measurement of FFR in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention that was, therefore, the aim of our study. We included patients undergoing coronary angiography and FFR assessment for intermediate (40-70%) coronary lesions. FFR measurement was performed by pressure-recording guidewire (Prime Wire, Volcano), after induction of hyperemia with intracoronary boli of adenosine (from 60 to 1440 µg, with dose doubling at each step). Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was performed to assess the presence of rs5751876 C>T polymorphism of ADORA2a receptor. We included 204 patients undergoing FFR measurement of 231 coronary lesions. A total of 134 patients carried the polymorphism (T allele), of whom 41 (30.6%) in homozygosis (T/T).Main clinical and angiographic features did not differ according to ADORA2A genotype. The rs5751876 C>T polymorphism did not affect mean FFR values (p = 0.91), the percentage of positive FFR (p = 0.54) and the duration of maximal hyperemia. However, the time to recovery to baseline FFR values was more prolonged among the T-allele carriers as compared to wild-type patients (p = 0.04). Based on these results, in patients with intermediate coronary stenoses undergoing FFR assessment with adenosine, the polymorphism rs5751876 of ADORA2A does not affect the peak hyperemic response to adenosine and the results of FFR. However, a more prolonged effect of adenosine was observed in T-carriers.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease/genetics , Coronary Stenosis/genetics , Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Receptor, Adenosine A2A/genetics , Adenosine/administration & dosage , Aged , Cardiac Catheterization , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Disease/physiopathology , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Coronary Stenosis/diagnosis , Coronary Stenosis/physiopathology , Coronary Stenosis/therapy , Female , Humans , Hyperemia/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Phenotype , Predictive Value of Tests , Severity of Illness Index , Vasodilator Agents/administration & dosage
20.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444117

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells present in virtually all tissues; they have a potent self-renewal capacity and can differentiate into multiple cell types. They also affect the ambient tissue by the paracrine secretion of numerous factors in vivo, including the induction of other stem cells' differentiation. In vitro, the culture media supernatant is named secretome and contains soluble molecules and extracellular vesicles that retain potent biological function in tissue regeneration. MSCs are considered safe for human treatment; their use does not involve ethical issues, as embryonic stem cells do not require genetic manipulation as induced pluripotent stem cells, and after intravenous injection, they are mainly found in the lugs. Therefore, these cells are currently being tested in various preclinical and clinical trials for several diseases, including COVID-19. Several affected COVID-19 patients develop induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) associated with an uncontrolled inflammatory response. This condition causes extensive damage to the lungs and may leave serious post-COVID-19 sequelae. As the disease may cause systemic alterations, such as thromboembolism and compromised renal and cardiac function, the intravenous injection of MSCs may be a therapeutic alternative against multiple pathological manifestations. In this work, we reviewed the literature about MSCs biology, focusing on their function in pulmonary regeneration and their use in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Lung/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Regeneration/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Differentiation , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Culture Media , Extracellular Vesicles , Humans , Inflammation , Mice , Mice, SCID , Phenotype , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/blood , Thromboembolism/immunology , Thromboembolism/therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...