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1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 787845, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572345

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has caused phenomenal loss of lives and overburdened the health system in India. Low morale, fatigue, and inadequate knowledge among the healthcare workers (HCWs) are the perceived threats to pandemic control. We aimed to assess the COVID-19 related level of knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) among our HCWs. A cross-sectional, electronically distributed, questionnaire-based study was conducted which identified the demographics of HCWs and the current KAP related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The descriptive statistics were used to present the demographics of the participants and chi-square test was used to assess the differences in KAP among the participants. Of 1,429 total participants, 71.9% belonged to age group 21-40 years. Only 40.2% received any infection control training and 62.7% relied upon single source of information update. However, 82.9% of the participants had adequate knowledge. Being married, urban dwelling, and higher qualification were associated with knowledge adequacy (p < 0.001). Interestingly, the senior HCWs (age 41-50 years) were least likely to have adequate knowledge (74.1%). About 84% had positive attitude toward COVID-19, but 83.8% of the participants feared providing care to the patients with COVID-19. However, 93% of HCWs practiced safety precautions correctly most of the times and training had no influence on practice. In conclusion, more than 80% of HCWs in the study had adequate knowledge, positive attitude, and practiced safely most of the time. However, the pitfalls, such as poor training, knowledge uncertainties, and fear of disease acquisition among the HCWs need to be addressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , India/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Phobic Disorders , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 670, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus currently cause a lot of pressure on the health system. Accordingly, many changes occurred in the way of providing health care, including pregnancy and childbirth care. To our knowledge, no studies on experiences of maternity care Providers during the COVID-19 Pandemic have been published in Iran. We aimed to discover their experiences on pregnancy and childbirth care during the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This study was a qualitative research performed with a descriptive phenomenological approach. The used sampling method was purposive sampling by taking the maximum variation possible into account, which continued until data saturation. Accordingly, in-depth and semi-structured interviews were conducted by including 12 participants, as 4 gynecologists, 6 midwives working in the hospitals and private offices, and 2 midwives working in the health centers. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven stage method with MAXQDA10 software. RESULTS: Data analysis led to the extraction of 3 themes, 9 categories, and 25 subcategories. The themes were as follows: "Fear of Disease", "Burnout", and "Lessons Learned from the COVID-19 Pandemic", respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal health care providers experience emotional and psychological stress and work challenges during the current COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, comprehensive support should be provided for the protection of their physical and mental health statuses. By working as a team, utilizing the capacity of telemedicine to care and follow up mothers, and providing maternity care at home, some emerged challenges to maternal care services can be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Iran/epidemiology , Maternal Health Services/trends , Middle Aged , Midwifery/statistics & numerical data , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Telemedicine/methods
4.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E66, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323410

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe COVID-19 illness in adults has been linked to underlying medical conditions. This study identified frequent underlying conditions and their attributable risk of severe COVID-19 illness. METHODS: We used data from more than 800 US hospitals in the Premier Healthcare Database Special COVID-19 Release (PHD-SR) to describe hospitalized patients aged 18 years or older with COVID-19 from March 2020 through March 2021. We used multivariable generalized linear models to estimate adjusted risk of intensive care unit admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, and death associated with frequent conditions and total number of conditions. RESULTS: Among 4,899,447 hospitalized adults in PHD-SR, 540,667 (11.0%) were patients with COVID-19, of whom 94.9% had at least 1 underlying medical condition. Essential hypertension (50.4%), disorders of lipid metabolism (49.4%), and obesity (33.0%) were the most common. The strongest risk factors for death were obesity (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.27-1.33), anxiety and fear-related disorders (aRR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.25-1.31), and diabetes with complication (aRR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.24-1.28), as well as the total number of conditions, with aRRs of death ranging from 1.53 (95% CI, 1.41-1.67) for patients with 1 condition to 3.82 (95% CI, 3.45-4.23) for patients with more than 10 conditions (compared with patients with no conditions). CONCLUSION: Certain underlying conditions and the number of conditions were associated with severe COVID-19 illness. Hypertension and disorders of lipid metabolism were the most frequent, whereas obesity, diabetes with complication, and anxiety disorders were the strongest risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness. Careful evaluation and management of underlying conditions among patients with COVID-19 can help stratify risk for severe illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Complications , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Multimorbidity , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Obesity , Phobic Disorders , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mortality , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/diagnosis , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
5.
Tuberk Toraks ; 69(2): 207-216, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310191

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at the forefront of the fight against coronavirus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COVID-19 phobia levels of HCWs of a pandemic hospital and explore associated factors. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted on HCWs employed in a pandemic hospital. A total of 365 HCWs (95 physicians, 187 nurses and 83 assistant healthcare staffs) were included in the study. In order to evaluate COVID-19 phobia, coronavirus-19 phobia scale (C19P-S) was administrated. Chronophobia levels of frontline and nonfrontline HCWs were compared. Additionally, the effect of working in different departments, profession and associated factors on COVID-19 phobia was evaluated. Result: Overall, 172 HCWs completed the C19P-S and agreed to participate in the study. Mean total CP19P-S score of the HCWs included in the study was 50.1 ± 17.3. Of the study population, 59.3% participants were frontline HCWs and 40.7% were non-frontline HCWs. When frontline HCWs and nonfrontline HCWs were compared in terms of total C19P-S and subscales scores (psychological, psycho-somatic, economic, social), no statistically significant differences were found (p= 0.914, p= 0.687, p= 0.766, p= 0.347, p= 0.794, respectively).When the HCWs were divided into three groups according to departments (clinics, intensive care unit (ICU), emergency department) where they worked regardless of whether they cared for patients with COVID-19, HCWs employed in the ICUs had the highest scores regarding total C19P-S and subscales scores (p= 0.002, p= 0.001, p= 0.001, p= 0.012, p= 0.002,respectively) . Profession based comparison revealed no significant difference between the groups regarding total C19P-S score (p= 0.117). Conclusions: It is essential to make a comprehensive evaluation regarding the effects of pandemics on HCWs, not only for controlling the COVID-19 pandemic but also to protect the mental health of HCWs. Critical care professions appear to need particular attention among HCWs. The C19P-S, which assesses coronaphobia levels with psychological, psycho-somatic, economic, and social aspects could be a convenient screening tool for evaluating COVID-19 phobia levels in HWCs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Mental Health , Phobic Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
7.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E66, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290851

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe COVID-19 illness in adults has been linked to underlying medical conditions. This study identified frequent underlying conditions and their attributable risk of severe COVID-19 illness. METHODS: We used data from more than 800 US hospitals in the Premier Healthcare Database Special COVID-19 Release (PHD-SR) to describe hospitalized patients aged 18 years or older with COVID-19 from March 2020 through March 2021. We used multivariable generalized linear models to estimate adjusted risk of intensive care unit admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, and death associated with frequent conditions and total number of conditions. RESULTS: Among 4,899,447 hospitalized adults in PHD-SR, 540,667 (11.0%) were patients with COVID-19, of whom 94.9% had at least 1 underlying medical condition. Essential hypertension (50.4%), disorders of lipid metabolism (49.4%), and obesity (33.0%) were the most common. The strongest risk factors for death were obesity (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.27-1.33), anxiety and fear-related disorders (aRR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.25-1.31), and diabetes with complication (aRR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.24-1.28), as well as the total number of conditions, with aRRs of death ranging from 1.53 (95% CI, 1.41-1.67) for patients with 1 condition to 3.82 (95% CI, 3.45-4.23) for patients with more than 10 conditions (compared with patients with no conditions). CONCLUSION: Certain underlying conditions and the number of conditions were associated with severe COVID-19 illness. Hypertension and disorders of lipid metabolism were the most frequent, whereas obesity, diabetes with complication, and anxiety disorders were the strongest risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness. Careful evaluation and management of underlying conditions among patients with COVID-19 can help stratify risk for severe illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Complications , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Multimorbidity , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Obesity , Phobic Disorders , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mortality , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/diagnosis , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(22): e26233, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258819

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is affecting mental health profoundly. Previous studies have reported pandemic-related anxiety. Anxiety disorder and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are common comorbidities. However, there has been no report of any patient with undiagnosed ASD who developed anxiety disorders caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this case report, we describe an 8-year-old Japanese boy with undiagnosed ASD who developed COVID-19 phobia, resulting in avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID). PATIENT CONCERNS: As COVID-19 was highly publicized in the mass media and the risk of droplet infection was emphasized upon, the patient began to fear viral contamination from food, culminating in a refusal to eat or even swallow his saliva. He was admitted to a pediatric medical center in Osaka with life-threatening dehydration and was then referred to our child psychiatry department. DIAGNOSIS: We diagnosed the patient with COVID-19 phobia resulting in ARFID. We identified ASD traits from his present social communication skills and developmental history. INTERVENTIONS: We provided psychoeducation of ASD for the parents and administered supportive psychotherapy. OUTCOMES: Shortly after our intervention to relieve his ASD-related anxiety, his dysphagia improved. LESSONS: Our findings suggest that children with undiagnosed ASD may develop COVID-19 phobia. In these cases, intervention for ASD may be more appropriate than starting treatment for anxiety disorders as the first-line option. COVID-19 is the biggest pandemic in the recent past, and more undiagnosed ASD patients who develop COVID-19 phobia may seek treatment. Clinicians should consider the underlying ASD in these patients and assess their developmental history and present social communication skills.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Phobic Disorders/complications , Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder , Child , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10362, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228276

ABSTRACT

Trypophobia is induced by viewing multiple clustered objects. To date, several studies have investigated why certain people experience discomfort when looking at clustered patterns. Recently, "involuntary protection against dermatosis" (IPAD) hypothesis was proposed to explain the causes of trypophobia. The IPAD hypothesis suggests that involuntary aversive responses to skin diseases cause discomfort in response to image clusters. However, this idea has not been fully investigated empirically. Therefore, the present study used a modified version of the priming procedure and tested whether the activation of the concept of skin-related diseases affected the evaluation of trypophobic images. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in a lexical decision task in which words related to skin problems, negative events, or neutral events were presented. Then, they evaluated the discomfort of trypophobic, negative, and neutral images. The results indicated that participants evaluated trypophobic images as more discomforting after they were exposed to skin-problem-related words, whereas the exposure to words related to skin-problems did not enhance the discomfort of negative images. These findings demonstrate that the association with skin-related problems increases the discomfort of trypophobic images. In Experiment 2, we further tested the reproducibility of the priming effect observed in Experiment 1 and investigated the effect of priming with words related to COVID-19 in the context of a spreading infection. Contrary to predictions, no priming effect was produced by either skin-related words or COVID-19-related words. Future studies should further explore the causal relationship of the association between skin disease and trypophobia.


Subject(s)
Pattern Recognition, Visual , Phobic Disorders/etiology , Skin Diseases , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
10.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 833, 2021 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209120

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has seriously affected the lives of millions of people across the world. It has also heavily burdened healthcare professionals and the virus poses serious risks for their personal and professional lives. Therefore, the present study examined the associations between fear of COVID-19 and workplace phobia among doctors in Pakistan during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was conducted among 421 doctors in Pakistan between April 10 and May 25, 2020. The Workplace Phobia Scale (WPS) and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) were the main psychometric instruments used in this study. RESULTS: There was a significant positive relationship between fear of COVID-19 and workplace panic anxiety and workplace avoidance behavior. Significantly higher fear of COVID-19 was found among (i) females compared to males, (ii) doctors with 5 years or less of work experience compared to those with more than 5 years, and (iii) postgraduate trainees compared with other ranks. Two groups (doctors who were above 30 years old and postgraduate trainees) were found to have higher levels of workplace phobia compared to their counterparts. Doctors with severe levels of fear of COVID-19 had significantly higher levels of workplace panic anxiety and workplace avoidance behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Fear of COVID-19 was significantly associated with workplace phobia which may negatively affect doctors' performance. Therefore, important steps are needed to protect doctors' health by providing sufficient resources to allay their fears and anxieties which consequently help them in carrying out their frontline duties in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phobic Disorders , Adult , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
11.
Ann Ig ; 33(4): 360-370, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206443

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) have changed into a global crisis. Psychologically, this process of alteration can lead to feelings of fear, insecurity, and anxiety. This fear and anxiety can be caused by a variety of factors. However, due to the lack of extensive studies at this time, there are little data on these conditions related to COVID-19. Therefore, in this narrative review, we have tried to identify the most important possible causes of anxiety and fear due to this disease, based on logical shreds of evidence. Then we tried to discuss the consequences and ways to manage and prevent them. Methods: The current focus was on three major axes of corona-phobia, fear and anxiety. PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Google Scholar and authoritative news and information sources were considered as the data sources. Results: Findings from the analysis of the results revealed that, in addition to the real and the logical reasons which belong to the intrinsic properties of SARS-CoV-2, some misleadings and misconceptions induced by media, governmental policies, public awareness level, and non-scientific speculations and contradictory data expressed by experts, researchers and scientific societies, could provide the way for the development of corona-phobia, and fear. Conclusions: Each of these causal components, in its place, leads to some degrees of psychological disorders and subsequent consequences and complications. Finally, here we reviewed, summarized the previous research findings on how to prevent and manage this type of psychological disorder, and made comparisons.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Pandemics , Phobic Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , Communication , Consumer Health Information , Culture , Dissent and Disputes , Expert Testimony , Health Policy , Humans , Information Dissemination , Mass Media , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Trust
12.
Future Oncol ; 17(20): 2621-2629, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195990

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the impact of coronaphobia on treatment and follow-up compliance in cancer patients. The records of 230 cancer patients were reviewed. Coronaphobia was assessed via the validated COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S). A total of 64% of the patients had a high coronaphobia score. Among them, 59% were noncompliant. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, low educational status, treatment type, following COVID-19 news, having knowledge about COVID-19 transmission and higher C19P-S score were associated with noncompliance (p = 0.006, p < 0.001, p = 0.002, p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that having knowledge about COVID-19 transmission was related to a higher C19P-S score (p = 0.001). The cancer patients studied had significant coronaphobia. Moreover, greater coronaphobia was significantly associated with noncompliance with follow-up and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Compliance/psychology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychometrics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211007393, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169942

ABSTRACT

As mass vaccination is underway to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and achieve herd immunity, healthcare professionals need to recognize the fear and phobia of needles among their patients. Approximately 11.5 to 66 million U.S. adults may suffer from this condition. This population often avoids seeking medical care including vaccinations. The exact number of people suffering from this phobia is unknown, and the potential years of life lost in the American health care system cannot be estimated accurately. The resistance to vaccinations among this population may delay achieving herd immunity to end this current pandemic. An overview of needle phobia, vaccinations, and current treatments are explored. The use of telemedicine could prove critical for reaching this population as well as those who are hesitant about vaccinations. Providing education to healthcare providers to identify and manage these patients during the pandemic is necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fear , Needles , Pandemics , Phobic Disorders , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Anxiety , Humans , Implosive Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 04 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167584

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a Korean version of the 20-item COVID-19 phobia tool, which was developed through a translation-reverse translation process. These data were collected from 226 persons using a self-reported questionnaire. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test construct validity. Finally, for 19 out of 20 items, the item-level convergence and differential validity were confirmed. In addition, the reliability and validity of the tool as a whole has been verified. For the subscales, Cronbach's α was 0.90 for psychological, 0.87 for psychosomatic, 0.86 for economic, and 0.87 for social. Appropriate reliability was confirmed. Correlations between the COVID-19 phobia tool and fear of COVID-19 confirmed validity. The Korean version of the COVID-19 phobia tool is an appropriate scale for measuring the fear of COVID-19 and relevant psychological characteristics. Therefore, future studies in areas such as health and nursing could use this tool as required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phobic Disorders , Humans , Phobic Disorders/diagnosis , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
J Addict Dis ; 39(4): 441-449, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114779

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Smartphone misuse, also known as Nomophobia is the fear of not being able to consult your own mobile phone, of not being connected or traceable. During the Italian lockdown caused by COVID-19, while the use of technology was the fundamental basis of adaptation for smart working, school and professional training, leading to a change in the population's lifestyle, smartphone dependency caused impaired social relationships. To date, the impact of smartphone dependency in men and women is unclear. We conducted this study with the hypothesis that a period of lockdown fosters the growth of a pathological use of the cell phone different in women and men. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this work is to investigate gender differences in the level of smartphone dependency in teens and adults during the COVID-19 lockdown period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The NoMobilePhobia-Questionnaire (NMP-Q) was presented online to 1264 participants between the ages of 15 and 67. RESULTS: The results show no significant main effects for the two factors taken into account (Gender and Age of participants). However, the significant interaction shows that female participants reported on average higher scores on NMP-Q than males, [F(4,1253) =7.06 and p<.001, observed power close to 1 (0.99) and effect size = 0.03 (ETA partial squared)] for the younger age group (15-44), while for those over the age of 44, the average highest scores were for male participants. CONCLUSIONS: One of the "positive" aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic is the use of the Internet and smartphones, and our analysis aimed to document the frequency of use in the Italian context with the NMP-Q. However, we can also conclude that this research is relevant because it can give us a glimpse of the relationship between dependency and mental issues. The results reveal the risk in some of the Italian population of developing forms of smartphone dependency, especially in circumstances that prohibit direct social interactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Smartphone/statistics & numerical data , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet Addiction Disorder/epidemiology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(6): e24141, 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global neo-coronary pneumonia epidemic has increased the workload of healthcare institutions in various countries and directly affected the physical and psychological recovery of the vast majority of patients requiring hospitalization in China. We anticipate that post-total knee arthroplasty kinesiophobia may have an impact on patients' postoperative pain scores, knee function, and ability to care for themselves in daily life. The purpose of this study is to conduct a micro-video intervention via WeChat to verify the impact of this method on the rapid recovery of patients with kinesiophobia after total knee arthroplasty during neo-coronary pneumonia. METHODS: Using convenience sampling method, 78 patients with kinesiophobia after artificial total knee arthroplasty who met the exclusion criteria were selected and randomly grouped, with the control group receiving routine off-line instruction and the intervention group receiving micro-video intervention, and the changes in the relevant indexes of the two groups of patients at different time points on postoperative day 1, 3 and 7 were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences in the scores of kinesiophobia, pain, knee flexion mobility (ROM) and ability to take care of daily life between the two groups on the first postoperative day (P > .05). On postoperative day 3 and 7, there were statistical differences in Tampa Scale for kinesiophobia, pain, activities of daily living scale score and ROM between the two groups (P < .01), and the first time of getting out of bed between the two groups (P < .05), and by repeated-measures ANOVA, there were statistically significant time points, groups and interaction effects of the outcome indicators between the 2 groups (P < .01), indicating that the intervention group reconstructed the patients' postoperative kinesiophobiaand hyperactivity. The level of pain awareness facilitates the patient's acquisition of the correct functional exercises to make them change their misbehavior. CONCLUSIONS: WeChat micro-video can reduce the fear of movement score and pain score in patients with kinesiophobia after unilateral total knee arthroplasty, shorten the first time out of bed, and improve their joint mobility and daily living ability. ETHICS: This study has passed the ethical review of the hospital where it was conducted and has been filed, Ethics Approval Number: 20181203-01.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Knee Joint/physiopathology , Knee Joint/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Pain, Postoperative/diagnosis , Pain, Postoperative/psychology , Pneumonia/virology , Postoperative Period , Prospective Studies , Range of Motion, Articular , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
17.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(6): e14089, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078963

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Social isolation and quarantine are unusual precautions taken all over the world against the COVID-19 pandemic. Some legal sanctions were made in order to protect vulnerable age groups such as the geriatric population, to make them stay at home. These measures, which are vital for pandemic management, have negative psychological effects on elderly individuals. The aim of this study was to reveal how pandemic process affected individuals over 65 years old psychosocially. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Socio-demographic characteristics questionnaire, the COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S) and the Loneliness Scale for the Elderly individuals were used. Descriptive analysis, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Pearson correlation analysis were performed for data analysis. RESULTS: A total of 130 elderly people (80 women, 50 men) were included in the study. Of the participants, 61.5% were women, 67.7% were married and mean age was 71.53 ± 5.57 (min. 65-max. 87) years old. The C19P-S scores were significantly higher in women, singles, people living alone, those living in an apartment, and those with higher economic and educational level (P = .001). There was a strong positive correlation between age and total loneliness score. Loneliness scores were significantly higher in singles, those with higher levels of education and income, those who live alone, who was a relative of a healthcare worker, and whose relatives were infected with COVID-19 (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Our study revealed that elderly individuals, who have to comply with social isolation rules, have increased fear and loneliness due to coronavirus. Considering this situation, timely psychological treatment and social support measures should be taken.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phobic Disorders , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Loneliness , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Midwifery ; 96: 102940, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071784

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to create and to validate the Polish version of the original English version of the Pandemic-Related Pregnancy Stress Scale (PREPS) developed by Preis and colleagues (2020a; 2020b) We additionally investigated the association of maternal obstetrical and pandemic related factors with the PREPS in order to test its sensitivity. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design with nonrandom sampling was used. The sample consisted of a total of 1148 pregnant women in various trimesters. They were recruited via social media and completed an online study questionnaire in April-May 2020. RESULTS: The results of the present research indicate satisfactory psychometric properties of the Polish version of the PREPS. Our findings confirm the factor structure found by the authors of the original English version of the PREPS. The scale consists of two stress subscales: perinatal infection stress and preparedness stress and one additional positive appraisal scale. Pandemic-related pregnancy stress is significantly associated with fear of childbirth and with non-pandemic pregnancy-specific stress, which bolsters its convergent validity. Higher levels of pandemic-related pregnancy stress are experienced by primiparas, those in their second or third trimester, women who received infertility treatment, and those with a high-risk pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: The Polish version of the PREPS has sound psychometric properties and replicates the structure of the original English PREPS. This stress scale can be used to investigate additional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and to identify women at risk of high stress and those who need intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Parturition , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Psychometrics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Poland , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Trimesters , Prenatal Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , Translations , Young Adult
20.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(9): 2169-2173, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has affected the world from every aspect. Individuals are drained from social, financial, and emotional percussion of this pandemic. Psychosocial consequences are far greater than are being perceived. It is anticipated that once the pandemic is over the psycho-emotional turbulence would shake the whole populations of affected countries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the psychological consequences of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A literature search was conducted on major databases from January 2020 to April 2020 with the search terms of Covid-19, Corona virus, psychological, depression, anxiety, phobias, obsessive behaviors, paranoia, parental relationship, marital life and maternal and fetal bond. CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 infection are more likely to suffer from a myriad of psychological consequences, and this infection may have profound effect on parenting, relationships, marital life, elderly, and maternal-fetal bond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Age Factors , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Global Burden of Disease , Global Health , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Male , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Maternal-Fetal Relations/psychology , Obsessive Behavior/epidemiology , Obsessive Behavior/etiology , Obsessive Behavior/psychology , Paranoid Disorders/epidemiology , Paranoid Disorders/etiology , Paranoid Disorders/psychology , Parenting/psychology , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/etiology , Phobic Disorders/psychology , Pregnancy , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
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