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1.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 14(3): 4456-4468, 2022 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1619771

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus represents an inspiring model for designing drug delivery systems due to its unique infection machinery mechanism. Herein, we have developed a biomimetic viruslike nanocomplex, termed SDN, for improving cancer theranostics. SDN has a unique core-shell structure consisting of photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6)-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (CeNLC) (virus core)@poly(allylamine hydrochloride)-functionalized MnO2 nanoparticles (virus spike), generating a virus-mimicking nanocomplex. SDN not only prompted cellular uptake through rough-surface-mediated endocytosis but also achieved mitochondrial accumulation by the interaction of cationic spikes and the anionic mitochondrial surface, leading to mitochondria-specific photodynamic therapy. Meanwhile, SDN could even mediate oxygen generation to relieve tumor hypoxia and, consequently, improve macrophage-associated anticancer immune response. Importantly, SDN served as a robust magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent due to the fast release of Mn2+ in the presence of intracellular redox components. We identified that SDN selectively accumulated in tumors and released Mn2+ to generate a 5.71-fold higher T1-MRI signal, allowing for effectively detecting suspected tumors. Particularly, SDN induced synergistic immunophotodynamic effects to eliminate malignant tumors with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, we present a novel biomimetic strategy for improving targeted theranostics, which has a wide range of potential biomedical applications.


Subject(s)
Drug Delivery Systems , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Bionics/methods , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorophyllides/chemistry , Chlorophyllides/pharmacology , Contrast Media/chemistry , Contrast Media/pharmacology , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Manganese Compounds/chemistry , Manganese Compounds/pharmacology , Neoplasms/immunology , Oxides/chemistry , Oxides/pharmacology , Photochemotherapy/methods , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Polyamines/chemistry , Polyamines/pharmacology
2.
Adv Sci (Weinh) ; 8(23): e2100118, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482096

ABSTRACT

Recently, viral infectious diseases, including COVID-19 and Influenza, are the subjects of major concerns worldwide. One strategy for addressing these concerns focuses on nasal vaccines, which have great potential for achieving successful immunization via safe, easy, and affordable approaches. However, conventional nasal vaccines have major limitations resulting from fast removal when pass through nasal mucosa and mucociliary clearance hindering their effectiveness. Herein a nanoparticulate vaccine (NanoVac) exhibiting photochemical immunomodulation and constituting a new self-assembled immunization system of a photoactivatable polymeric adjuvant with influenza virus hemagglutinin for efficient nasal delivery and antigen-specific immunity against pathogenic influenza viruses is described. NanoVac increases the residence period of antigens and further enhances by spatiotemporal photochemical modulation in the nasal cavity. As a consequence, photochemical immunomodulation of NanoVacs successfully induces humoral and cellular immune responses followed by stimulation of mature dendritic cells, plasma cells, memory B cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, resulting in secretion of antigen-specific immunoglobulins, cytokines, and CD8+ T cells. Notably, challenge with influenza virus after nasal immunization with NanoVacs demonstrates robust prevention of viral infection. Thus, this newly designed vaccine system can serve as a promising strategy for developing vaccines that are active against current hazardous pathogen outbreaks and pandemics.


Subject(s)
Hemagglutinins/chemistry , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Light , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Administration, Inhalation , Animals , Antigens/administration & dosage , Antigens/chemistry , Antigens/immunology , Dendritic Cells/cytology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Hemagglutinins/administration & dosage , Hemagglutinins/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral , Influenza Vaccines/chemistry , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry
3.
J Am Chem Soc ; 143(43): 17891-17909, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483091

ABSTRACT

The emergence of multi-drug-resistant pathogens threatens the healthcare systems world-wide. Recent advances in phototherapy (PT) approaches mediated by photo-antimicrobials (PAMs) provide new opportunities for the current serious antibiotic resistance. During the PT treatment, reactive oxygen species or heat produced by PAMs would react with the cell membrane, consequently leaking cytoplasm components and effectively eradicating different pathogens like bacteria, fungi, viruses, and even parasites. This Perspective will concentrate on the development of different organic photo-antimicrobials (OPAMs) and their application as practical therapeutic agents into therapy for local infections, wound dressings, and removal of biofilms from medical devices. We also discuss how to design highly efficient OPAMs by modifying the chemical structure or conjugating with a targeting component. Moreover, this Perspective provides a discussion of the general challenges and direction for OPAMs and what further needs to be done. It is hoped that through this overview, OPAMs can prosper and will be more widely used for microbial infections in the future, especially at a time when the global COVID-19 epidemic is getting more serious.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Drug Design , Phototherapy/methods , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria/drug effects , Biofilms/drug effects , Biofilms/radiation effects , Coloring Agents/chemistry , Coloring Agents/pharmacology , Equipment and Supplies/microbiology , Equipment and Supplies/virology , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Escherichia coli/physiology , Eye Diseases/drug therapy , Eye Diseases/pathology , Fungi/drug effects , Graphite/chemistry , Light , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Nanoparticles/toxicity , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , Quantum Theory , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Viruses/drug effects
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19029, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437689

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted the weaknesses of relying on single-use mask and respirator personal protective equipment (PPE) and the global supply chain that supports this market. There have been no major innovations in filter technology for PPE in the past two decades. Non-woven textiles used for filtering PPE are single-use products in the healthcare environment; use and protection is focused on preventing infection from airborne or aerosolized pathogens such as Influenza A virus or SARS-CoV-2. Recently, C-H bond activation under mild and controllable conditions was reported for crosslinking commodity aliphatic polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene. Significantly, these are the same types of polymers used in PPE filtration systems. In this report, we take advantage of this C-H insertion method to covalently attach a photosensitizing zinc-porphyrin to the surface of a melt-blow non-woven textile filter material. With the photosensitizer covalently attached to the surface of the textile, illumination with visible light was expected to produce oxidizing 1O2/ROS at the surface of the material that would result in pathogen inactivation. The filter was tested for its ability to inactivate Influenza A virus, an enveloped RNA virus similar to SARS-CoV-2, over a period of four hours with illumination of high intensity visible light. The photosensitizer-functionalized polypropylene filter inactivated our model virus by 99.99% in comparison to a control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Diazomethane/chemistry , Light , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Polypropylenes/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects
5.
Molecules ; 26(13)2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304689

ABSTRACT

Antiviral action of various photosensitizers is already summarized in several comprehensive reviews, and various mechanisms have been proposed for it. However, a critical consideration of the matter of the area is complicated, since the exact mechanisms are very difficult to explore and clarify, and most publications are of an empirical and "phenomenological" nature, reporting a dependence of the antiviral action on illumination, or a correlation of activity with the photophysical properties of the substances. Of particular interest is substance-assisted photogeneration of highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2). The damaging action of 1O2 on the lipids of the viral envelope can probably lead to a loss of the ability of the lipid bilayer of enveloped viruses to fuse with the lipid membrane of the host cell. Thus, lipid bilayer-affine 1O2 photosensitizers have prospects as broad-spectrum antivirals against enveloped viruses. In this short review, we want to point out the main types of antiviral photosensitizers with potential affinity to the lipid bilayer and summarize the data on new compounds over the past three years. Further understanding of the data in the field will spur a targeted search for substances with antiviral activity against enveloped viruses among photosensitizers able to bind to the lipid membranes.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents , Membrane Lipids/metabolism , Photosensitizing Agents , Viral Envelope/metabolism , Virus Diseases , Viruses/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacokinetics , Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , Singlet Oxygen , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/metabolism
6.
Viruses ; 13(4)2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178430

ABSTRACT

Photodynamic inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms can be successfully used to eradicate pathogens in localized lesions, infected liquid media, and on various surfaces. This technique utilizes the photosensitizer (PS), light, and molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species that kill pathogens. Here, we used the PS, water soluble octakis(cholinyl)zinc phthalocyanine (Zn-PcChol8+), to inactivate an initial 4.75-5.00 IgTCID50/mL titer of SARS-CoV-2, thereby preventing viral infection when tested in Vero E6 cell cultures. Zn-PcChol8+ in a minimally studied concentration, 1 µM and LED 3.75 J/cm2, completely destroyed the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2. To detect possible PS binding sites on the envelope of SARS-CoV-2, we analyzed electrostatic potential and simulated binding of Zn-PcChol8+ to the spike protein of this coronavirus by means of Brownian dynamics software, ProKSim (Protein Kinetics Simulator). Most of the Zn-PcChol8+ molecules formed clusters at the upper half of the stalk within a vast area of negative electrostatic potential. Positioning of the PS on the surface of the spike protein at a distance of no more than 10 nm from the viral membrane may be favorable for the oxidative damage. The high sensitivity of SARS-CoV-2 to photodynamic inactivation by Zn-PcChol8+ is discussed with respect to the application of this PS to control the spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Indoles/pharmacology , Organometallic Compounds/pharmacology , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chlorocebus aethiops , Indoles/chemistry , Isoindoles , Light , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Organometallic Compounds/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Vero Cells , Zinc Compounds
7.
Molecules ; 25(19)2020 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803884

ABSTRACT

The problem of treating viral infections is extremely relevant due to both the emergence of new viral diseases and to the low effectiveness of existing approaches to the treatment of known viral infections. This review focuses on the application of porphyrin, chlorin, and phthalocyanine series for combating viral infections by chemical and photochemical inactivation methods. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize the main approaches developed to date in the chemical and photodynamic inactivation of human and animal viruses using porphyrins and their analogues and to analyze and discuss the information on viral targets and antiviral activity of porphyrins, chlorins, of their conjugates with organic/inorganic compounds obtained in the last 10-15 years in order to identify the most promising areas.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Photochemotherapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Porphyrins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19 , Humans , Indoles/chemistry , Indoles/pharmacology , Isoindoles , Pandemics , Photochemical Processes , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Porphyrins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Attachment/drug effects
8.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(1): 155-163, 2021 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997777

ABSTRACT

A substantial increase in the risk of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) has greatly impacted the global healthcare industry. Harmful pathogens adhere to a variety of surfaces and infect personnel on contact, thereby promoting transmission to new hosts. This is particularly worrisome in the case of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, which constitute a growing threat to human health worldwide and require new preventative routes of disinfection. In this study, we have incorporated different loading levels of a porphyrin photosensitizer capable of generating reactive singlet oxygen in the presence of O2 and visible light in a water-soluble, photo-cross-linkable polymer coating, which was subsequently deposited on polymer microfibers. Two different application methods are considered, and the morphological and chemical characteristics of these coated fibers are analyzed to detect the presence of the coating and photosensitizer. To discern the efficacy of the fibers against pathogenic bacteria, photodynamic inactivation has been performed on two different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli, with population reductions of >99.9999 and 99.6%, respectively, after exposure to visible light for 1 h. In response to the current COVID-19 pandemic, we also confirm that these coated fibers can inactivate a human common cold coronavirus serving as a surrogate for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Photosensitizing Agents/pharmacology , Polymers/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Escherichia coli/pathogenicity , Humans , Iatrogenic Disease/prevention & control , Light , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/pathogenicity , Microfibrils/chemistry , Pandemics , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Polymers/chemistry , Porphyrins/chemistry , Porphyrins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Singlet Oxygen
9.
J Photochem Photobiol B ; 212: 111999, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720629

ABSTRACT

The global dissemination of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has accelerated the need for the implementation of effective antimicrobial strategies to target the causative agent SARS-CoV-2. Light-based technologies have a demonstrable broad range of activity over standard chemotherapeutic antimicrobials and conventional disinfectants, negligible emergence of resistance, and the capability to modulate the host immune response. This perspective article identifies the benefits, challenges, and pitfalls of repurposing light-based strategies to combat the emergence of COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Light , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/radiation effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Infrared Rays/therapeutic use , Lasers, Solid-State/therapeutic use , Low-Level Light Therapy , Pandemics , Photosensitizing Agents/chemistry , Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultraviolet Rays
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