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1.
J Virol ; 94(18)2020 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640272

ABSTRACT

In recent years, nidoviruses have emerged as important respiratory pathogens of reptiles, affecting captive python populations. In pythons, nidovirus (recently reclassified as serpentovirus) infection induces an inflammation of the upper respiratory and alimentary tract which can develop into a severe, often fatal proliferative pneumonia. We observed pyogranulomatous and fibrinonecrotic lesions in organ systems other than the respiratory tract during full postmortem examinations on 30 serpentovirus reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR)-positive pythons of varying species originating from Switzerland and Spain. The observations prompted us to study whether this not yet reported wider distribution of lesions is associated with previously unknown serpentoviruses or changes in the serpentovirus genome. RT-PCR and inoculation of Morelia viridis cell cultures served to recruit the cases and obtain virus isolates. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining against serpentovirus nucleoprotein demonstrated that the virus infects not only a broad spectrum of epithelia (respiratory and alimentary epithelium, hepatocytes, renal tubules, pancreatic ducts, etc.), but also intravascular monocytes, intralesional macrophages, and endothelial cells. With next-generation sequencing we obtained a full-length genome for a novel serpentovirus species circulating in Switzerland. Analysis of viral genomes recovered from pythons showing serpentovirus infection-associated respiratory or systemic disease did not reveal sequence association to phenotypes; however, functional studies with different strains are needed to confirm this observation. The results indicate that serpentoviruses have a broad cell and tissue tropism, further suggesting that the course of infection could vary and involve lesions in a broad spectrum of tissues and organ systems as a consequence of monocyte-mediated viral systemic spread.IMPORTANCE During the last years, python nidoviruses (now reclassified as serpentoviruses) have become a primary cause of fatal disease in pythons. Serpentoviruses represent a threat to captive snake collections, as they spread rapidly and can be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Our study indicates that, different from previous evidence, the viruses do not only affect the respiratory tract, but can spread in the entire body with blood monocytes, have a broad spectrum of target cells, and can induce a variety of lesions. Nidovirales is an order of animal and human viruses that comprises important zoonotic pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and SARS-CoV-2. Serpentoviruses belong to the same order as the above-mentioned human viruses and show similar characteristics (rapid spread, respiratory and gastrointestinal tropism, etc.). The present study confirms the relevance of natural animal diseases to better understand the complexity of viruses of the order Nidovirales.


Subject(s)
Nidovirales Infections/virology , Nidovirales/physiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Animal Diseases/diagnosis , Animal Diseases/virology , Animals , Biopsy , Boidae/virology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Nidovirales/isolation & purification , Nidovirales Infections/diagnosis , Organ Specificity , Phenotype , Phylogeny , Recombination, Genetic , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Viral Tropism , Virus Shedding
2.
J Virol ; 94(15)2020 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-762192

ABSTRACT

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory disease in humans. MERS-CoV strains from early epidemic clade A and contemporary epidemic clade B have not been phenotypically characterized to compare their abilities to infect cells and mice. We isolated the clade B MERS-CoV ChinaGD01 strain from a patient infected during the South Korean MERS outbreak in 2015 and compared the phylogenetics and pathogenicity of MERS-CoV EMC/2012 (clade A) and ChinaGD01 (clade B) in vitro and in vivo Genome alignment analysis showed that most clade-specific mutations occurred in the orf1ab gene, including mutations that were predicted to be potential glycosylation sites. Minor differences in viral growth but no significant differences in plaque size or sensitivity to beta interferon (IFN-ß) were detected between these two viruses in vitro ChinaGD01 virus infection induced more weight loss and inflammatory cytokine production in human DPP4-transduced mice. Viral titers were higher in the lungs of ChinaGD01-infected mice than with EMC/2012 infection. Decreased virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell numbers were detected in the lungs of ChinaGD01-infected mice. In conclusion, MERS-CoV evolution induced changes to reshape its pathogenicity and virulence in vitro and in vivo and to evade adaptive immune response to hinder viral clearance.IMPORTANCE MERS-CoV is an important emerging pathogen and causes severe respiratory infection in humans. MERS-CoV strains from early epidemic clade A and contemporary epidemic clade B have not been phenotypically characterized to compare their abilities to infect cells and mice. In this study, we showed that a clade B virus ChinaGD01 strain caused more severe disease in mice, with delayed viral clearance, increased inflammatory cytokines, and decreased antiviral T cell responses, than the early clade A virus EMC/2012. Given the differences in pathogenicity of different clades of MERS-CoV, periodic assessment of currently circulating MERS-CoV is needed to monitor potential severity of zoonotic disease.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genotype , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Adult , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Genome, Viral , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Interferon Type I/pharmacology , Male , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/classification , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/genetics , Whole Genome Sequencing
3.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 14179, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741695

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) emerged from China in late 2019 and rapidly spread across the globe, infecting millions of people and generating societal disruption on a level not seen since the 1918 influenza pandemic. A safe and effective vaccine is desperately needed to prevent the continued spread of SARS-CoV-2; yet, rational vaccine design efforts are currently hampered by the lack of knowledge regarding viral epitopes targeted during an immune response, and the need for more in-depth knowledge on betacoronavirus immunology. To that end, we developed a computational workflow using a series of open-source algorithms and webtools to analyze the proteome of SARS-CoV-2 and identify putative T cell and B cell epitopes. Utilizing a set of stringent selection criteria to filter peptide epitopes, we identified 41 T cell epitopes (5 HLA class I, 36 HLA class II) and 6 B cell epitopes that could serve as promising targets for peptide-based vaccine development against this emerging global pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first study to comprehensively analyze all 10 (structural, non-structural and accessory) proteins from SARS-CoV-2 using predictive algorithms to identify potential targets for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Computational Biology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Genome, Viral , Genomics/methods , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Peptides/chemistry , Peptides/immunology , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Vaccines/immunology
4.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 4235, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738373

ABSTRACT

Bats are presumed reservoirs of diverse coronaviruses (CoVs) including progenitors of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV and SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19. However, the evolution and diversification of these coronaviruses remains poorly understood. Here we use a Bayesian statistical framework and a large sequence data set from bat-CoVs (including 630 novel CoV sequences) in China to study their macroevolution, cross-species transmission and dispersal. We find that host-switching occurs more frequently and across more distantly related host taxa in alpha- than beta-CoVs, and is more highly constrained by phylogenetic distance for beta-CoVs. We show that inter-family and -genus switching is most common in Rhinolophidae and the genus Rhinolophus. Our analyses identify the host taxa and geographic regions that define hotspots of CoV evolutionary diversity in China that could help target bat-CoV discovery for proactive zoonotic disease surveillance. Finally, we present a phylogenetic analysis suggesting a likely origin for SARS-CoV-2 in Rhinolophus spp. bats.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Zoonoses/transmission , Animals , Bayes Theorem , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Biodiversity , China , Chiroptera/classification , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Phylogeography , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Zoonoses/virology
5.
J Virol ; 94(12)2020 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736044

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that recently emerged in China is thought to have a bat origin, as its closest known relative (BatCoV RaTG13) was described previously in horseshoe bats. We analyzed the selective events that accompanied the divergence of SARS-CoV-2 from BatCoV RaTG13. To this end, we applied a population genetics-phylogenetics approach, which leverages within-population variation and divergence from an outgroup. Results indicated that most sites in the viral open reading frames (ORFs) evolved under conditions of strong to moderate purifying selection. The most highly constrained sequences corresponded to some nonstructural proteins (nsps) and to the M protein. Conversely, nsp1 and accessory ORFs, particularly ORF8, had a nonnegligible proportion of codons evolving under conditions of very weak purifying selection or close to selective neutrality. Overall, limited evidence of positive selection was detected. The 6 bona fide positively selected sites were located in the N protein, in ORF8, and in nsp1. A signal of positive selection was also detected in the receptor-binding motif (RBM) of the spike protein but most likely resulted from a recombination event that involved the BatCoV RaTG13 sequence. In line with previous data, we suggest that the common ancestor of SARS-CoV-2 and BatCoV RaTG13 encoded/encodes an RBM similar to that observed in SARS-CoV-2 itself and in some pangolin viruses. It is presently unknown whether the common ancestor still exists and, if so, which animals it infects. Our data, however, indicate that divergence of SARS-CoV-2 from BatCoV RaTG13 was accompanied by limited episodes of positive selection, suggesting that the common ancestor of the two viruses was poised for human infection.IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are dangerous zoonotic pathogens; in the last 2 decades, three coronaviruses have crossed the species barrier and caused human epidemics. One of these is the recently emerged SARS-CoV-2. We investigated how, since its divergence from a closely related bat virus, natural selection shaped the genome of SARS-CoV-2. We found that distinct coding regions in the SARS-CoV-2 genome evolved under conditions of different degrees of constraint and are consequently more or less prone to tolerate amino acid substitutions. In practical terms, the level of constraint provides indications about which proteins/protein regions are better suited as possible targets for the development of antivirals or vaccines. We also detected limited signals of positive selection in three viral ORFs. However, we warn that, in the absence of knowledge about the chain of events that determined the human spillover, these signals should not be necessarily interpreted as evidence of an adaptation to our species.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Selection, Genetic , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Models, Molecular , Open Reading Frames/genetics , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics
6.
BMC Res Notes ; 13(1): 398, 2020 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733023

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In December 2019 a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that is causing the current COVID-19 pandemic was identified in Wuhan, China. Many questions have been raised about its origin and adaptation to humans. In the present work we performed a genetic analysis of the Spike glycoprotein (S) of SARS-CoV-2 and other related coronaviruses (CoVs) isolated from different hosts in order to trace the evolutionary history of this protein and the adaptation of SARS-CoV-2 to humans. RESULTS: Based on the sequence analysis of the S gene, we suggest that the origin of SARS-CoV-2 is the result of recombination events between bat and pangolin CoVs. The hybrid SARS-CoV-2 ancestor jumped to humans and has been maintained by natural selection. Although the S protein of RaTG13 bat CoV has a high nucleotide identity with the S protein of SARS-CoV-2, the phylogenetic tree and the haplotype network suggest a non-direct parental relationship between these CoVs. Moreover, it is likely that the basic function of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of S protein was acquired by the SARS-CoV-2 from the MP789 pangolin CoV by recombination and it has been highly conserved.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronaviridae/genetics , Recombination, Genetic , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adaptation, Biological/genetics , Animals , Binding Sites/genetics , Chiroptera/virology , Eutheria/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Furin/metabolism , Host Specificity , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phylogeny , Selection, Genetic , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
7.
PLoS Biol ; 18(8): e3000869, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-727315

ABSTRACT

Genomic epidemiology can provide a unique, real-time understanding of SARS-CoV-2 transmission patterns. Yet the potential for genomic analyses to guide local policy and community-based behavioral decisions is limited because they are often oriented towards specially trained scientists and conducted on a national or global scale. Here, we propose a new paradigm: Phylogenetic analyses performed on a local level (municipal, county, or state), with results communicated in a clear, timely, and actionable manner to strengthen public health responses. We believe that presenting results rapidly, and tailored to a non-expert audience, can serve as a template for effective public health response to COVID-19 and other emerging viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Information Dissemination , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health , Genomics , Humans , Pandemics , Phylogeny
8.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 14004, 2020 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724698

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel evolutionary divergent RNA virus, is responsible for the present devastating COVID-19 pandemic. To explore the genomic signatures, we comprehensively analyzed 2,492 complete and/or near-complete genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 strains reported from across the globe to the GISAID database up to 30 March 2020. Genome-wide annotations revealed 1,516 nucleotide-level variations at different positions throughout the entire genome of SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, nucleotide (nt) deletion analysis found twelve deletion sites throughout the genome other than previously reported deletions at coding sequence of the ORF8 (open reading frame), spike, and ORF7a proteins, specifically in polyprotein ORF1ab (n = 9), ORF10 (n = 1), and 3´-UTR (n = 2). Evidence from the systematic gene-level mutational and protein profile analyses revealed a large number of amino acid (aa) substitutions (n = 744), demonstrating the viral proteins heterogeneous. Notably, residues of receptor-binding domain (RBD) showing crucial interactions with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and cross-reacting neutralizing antibody were found to be conserved among the analyzed virus strains, except for replacement of lysine with arginine at 378th position of the cryptic epitope of a Shanghai isolate, hCoV-19/Shanghai/SH0007/2020 (EPI_ISL_416320). Furthermore, our results of the preliminary epidemiological data on SARS-CoV-2 infections revealed that frequency of aa mutations were relatively higher in the SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences of Europe (43.07%) followed by Asia (38.09%), and North America (29.64%) while case fatality rates remained higher in the European temperate countries, such as Italy, Spain, Netherlands, France, England and Belgium. Thus, the present method of genome annotation employed at this early pandemic stage could be a promising tool for monitoring and tracking the continuously evolving pandemic situation, the associated genetic variants, and their implications for the development of effective control and prophylaxis strategies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genetic Heterogeneity , Genome, Viral/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study/methods , Global Health , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Amino Acid Sequence/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Base Pair Mismatch , Base Sequence/genetics , Climate , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Open Reading Frames/genetics , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Domains/genetics , Protein Domains/immunology , Sequence Deletion , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
9.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 14031, 2020 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724696

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was declared on March 11, 2020 by the World Health Organization. As of the 31st of May, 2020, there have been more than 6 million COVID-19 cases diagnosed worldwide and over 370,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins. Thousands of SARS-CoV-2 strains have been sequenced to date, providing a valuable opportunity to investigate the evolution of the virus on a global scale. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of over 1,225 SARS-CoV-2 genomes spanning from late December 2019 to mid-March 2020. We identified a missense mutation, D614G, in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, which has emerged as a predominant clade in Europe (954 of 1,449 (66%) sequences) and is spreading worldwide (1,237 of 2,795 (44%) sequences). Molecular dating analysis estimated the emergence of this clade around mid-to-late January (10-25 January) 2020. We also applied structural bioinformatics to assess the potential impact of D614G on the virulence and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2. In silico analyses on the spike protein structure suggests that the mutation is most likely neutral to protein function as it relates to its interaction with the human ACE2 receptor. The lack of clinical metadata available prevented our investigation of association between viral clade and disease severity phenotype. Future work that can leverage clinical outcome data with both viral and human genomic diversity is needed to monitor the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Evolution, Molecular , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Base Sequence , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Child , Child, Preschool , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation, Missense , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Conformation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virulence/genetics , Young Adult
10.
Open Vet J ; 10(2): 164-177, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724486

ABSTRACT

Viruses are having great time as they seem to have bogged humans down. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and novel coronavirus (COVID-19) are the three major coronaviruses of present-day global human and animal health concern. COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 is identified as the newest disease, presumably of bat origin. Different theories on the evolution of viruses are in circulation, yet there is no denying the fact that the animal source is the skeleton. The whole world is witnessing the terror of the COVID-19 pandemic that is following the same path of SARS and MERS, and seems to be more severe. In addition to humans, several species of animals are reported to have been infected with these life-threatening viruses. The possible routes of transmission and their zoonotic potentialities are the subjects of intense research. This review article aims to overview the link of all these three deadly coronaviruses among animals along with their phylogenic evolution and cross-species transmission. This is essential since animals as pets or food are said to pose some risk, and their better understanding is a must in order to prepare a possible plan for future havoc in both human and animal health. Although COVID-19 is causing a human health hazard globally, its reporting in animals are limited compared to SARS and MERS. Non-human primates and carnivores are most susceptible to SARS-coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2, respectively, whereas the dromedary camel is susceptible to MERS-coronavirus. Phylogenetically, the trio viruses are reported to have originated from bats and have special capacity to undergo mutation and genomic recombination in order to infect humans through its reservoir or replication host. However, it is difficult to analyze how the genomic pattern of coronaviruses occurs. Thus, increased possibility of new virus-variants infecting humans and animals in the upcoming days seems to be the biggest challenge for the future of the world. One health approach is portrayed as our best way ahead, and understanding the animal dimension will go a long way in formulating such preparedness plans.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/classification , Pandemics/veterinary , Pneumonia, Viral/veterinary , SARS Virus/classification , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/veterinary , Animals , Animals, Wild , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Camelids, New World/virology , Camelus/virology , Cats , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Susceptibility/veterinary , Dogs , Eutheria/virology , Ferrets/virology , Humans , Lions/virology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Primates/virology , Raccoon Dogs/virology , SARS Virus/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Snakes/virology , Tigers/virology , Viverridae/virology
11.
J Chin Med Assoc ; 83(8): 725-732, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709365

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused severe pneumonia at December 2019. Since then, it has been wildly spread from Wuhan, China, to Asia, European, and United States to become the pandemic worldwide. Now coronavirus disease 2019 were globally diagnosed over 3 084 740 cases with mortality of 212 561 toll. Current reports variants are found in SARS-CoV-2, majoring in functional ribonucleic acid (RNA) to transcribe into structural proteins as transmembrane spike (S) glycoprotein and the nucleocapsid (N) protein holds the virus RNA genome; the envelope (E) and membrane (M) alone with spike protein form viral envelope. The nonstructural RNA genome includes ORF1ab, ORF3, ORF6, 7a, 8, and ORF10 with highly conserved information for genome synthesis and replication in ORF1ab. METHODS: We apply genomic alignment analysis to observe SARS-CoV-2 sequences from GenBank (http://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/genebank/): MN 908947 (China, C1); MN985325 (United States: WA, UW); MN996527 (China, C2); MT007544 (Australia: Victoria, A1); MT027064 (United States: CA, UC); MT039890 (South Korea, K1); MT066175 (Taiwan, T1); MT066176 (Taiwan, T2); LC528232 (Japan, J1); and LC528233 (Japan, J2) and Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data database (https://www.gisaid.org). We adopt Multiple Sequence Alignments web from Clustalw (https://www.genome.jp/tools-bin/clustalw) and Geneious web (https://www.geneious.com. RESULTS: We analyze database by genome alignment search for nonstructural ORFs and structural E, M, N, and S proteins. Mutations in ORF1ab, ORF3, and ORF6 are observed; specific variants in spike region are detected. CONCLUSION: We perform genomic analysis and comparative multiple sequence of SARS-CoV-2. Large scaling sequence alignments trace to localize and catch different mutant strains in United possibly to transmit severe deadly threat to humans. Studies about the biological symptom of SARS-CoV-2 in clinic animal and humans will be applied and manipulated to find mechanisms and shield the light for understanding the origin of pandemic crisis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral , Open Reading Frames , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Humans , Phylogeny , Point Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
12.
Cell Host Microbe ; 27(3): 325-328, 2020 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709361

ABSTRACT

An in-depth annotation of the newly discovered coronavirus (2019-nCoV) genome has revealed differences between 2019-nCoV and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or SARS-like coronaviruses. A systematic comparison identified 380 amino acid substitutions between these coronaviruses, which may have caused functional and pathogenic divergence of 2019-nCoV.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Amino Acid Substitution , China , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pandemics , SARS Virus
13.
Med Sci (Paris) ; 36(8-9): 783-796, 2020.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706965

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a new human coronavirus (CoV), which emerged in People's Republic of China at the end of 2019 and is responsible for the global Covid-19 pandemic that caused more than 540 000 deaths in six months. Understanding the origin of this virus is an important issue and it is necessary to determine the mechanisms of its dissemination in order to be able to contain new epidemics. Based on phylogenetic inferences, sequence analysis and structure-function relationships of coronavirus proteins, informed by the knowledge currently available, we discuss the different scenarios evoked to account for the origin - natural or synthetic - of the virus. On the basis of currently available data, it is impossible to determine whether SARS-CoV-2 is the result of a natural zoonotic emergence or an accidental escape from experimental strains. Regardless of its origin, the study of the evolution of the molecular mechanisms involved in the emergence of this pandemic virus is essential to develop therapeutic and vaccine strategies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus/classification , Evolution, Molecular , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biohazard Release , China/epidemiology , Coronaviridae Infections/transmission , Coronaviridae Infections/veterinary , Coronaviridae Infections/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Reservoirs , Gain of Function Mutation , Genome, Viral , HIV/genetics , Host Specificity , Humans , Mammals/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Reassortant Viruses/genetics , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Zoonoses
14.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697044

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has become a major global concern as of December 2019, particularly affecting healthcare workers. As person-to-person transmission is airborne, crowded closed spaces have high potential for rapid virus spread, especially early in the pandemic when social distancing and mask wearing were not mandatory. This retrospective study thoroughly investigates a small-scale SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in Israel's central virology laboratory (ICVL) in mid-March 2020, in which six staff members and two related family members were infected. Suspicions regarding infection by contaminated surfaces in ICVL facilities were nullified by SARS-CoV-2 negative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of work surfaces swipe tests. Complete SARS-CoV-2 genomes were sequenced and mutation analyses showed inclusion of all samples to clades 20B and 20C, possessing the spike mutation D614G. Phylogenetic analysis clarified transmission events, confirming S1 as having infected at least three other staff members and refuting the association of a staff member's infected spouse with the ICVL transmission cluster. Finally, serology tests exhibited IgG and IgA antibodies in all infected individuals and revealed the occurrence of asymptomatic infections in additional staff members. This study demonstrates the advantages of molecular epidemiology in elucidating transmission events and exemplifies the importance of good laboratory practice, distancing and mask wearing in preventing SARS-CoV-2 spread, specifically in healthcare facilities.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Mutation , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health , Retrospective Studies , Serologic Tests
15.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696041

ABSTRACT

Zoonoses can constitute a threat for public health that can have a global importance, as seen with the current COVID-19 pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV2). Bats have been recognized as an important reservoir of zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs). In West Africa, where there is a high diversity of bat species, little is known on the circulation of CoVs in these hosts, especially at the interface with human populations. In this study, in Guinea, we tested a total of 319 bats belonging to 14 genera and six families of insectivorous and frugivorous bats across the country, for the presence of coronaviruses. We found CoVs in 35 (11%) of the tested bats-in three insectivorous bat species and five fruit bat species that were mostly captured close to human habitat. Positivity rates varied from 5.7% to 100%, depending on bat species. A wide diversity of alpha and beta coronaviruses was found across the country, including three sequences belonging to SarbeCoVs and MerbeCoVs subgenera known to harbor highly pathogenic human coronaviruses. Our findings suggest that CoVs are widely spread in West Africa and their circulation should be assessed to evaluate the risk of exposure of potential zoonotic CoVs to humans.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/genetics , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Biodiversity , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Female , Genome, Viral , Guinea , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pilot Projects , Pneumonia, Viral/veterinary , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Zoonoses/virology
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(12)2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692289

ABSTRACT

In the 21st century, three highly pathogenic betacoronaviruses have emerged, with an alarming rate of human morbidity and case fatality. Genomic information has been widely used to understand the pathogenesis, animal origin and mode of transmission of coronaviruses in the aftermath of the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and 2012 Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreaks. Furthermore, genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis have had an unprecedented relevance in the battle against the 2019-2020 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the newest and most devastating outbreak caused by a coronavirus in the history of mankind. Here, we review how genomic information has been used to tackle outbreaks caused by emerging, highly pathogenic, betacoronavirus strains, emphasizing on SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. We focus on shared genomic features of the betacoronaviruses and the application of genomic information to phylogenetic analysis, molecular epidemiology and the design of diagnostic systems, potential drugs and vaccine candidates.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Design , Genes, Viral , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Molecular Epidemiology , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , SARS Virus/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Viral Vaccines/immunology
17.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(33): 20198-20201, 2020 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691088

ABSTRACT

The Diamond Princess cruise ship was put under quarantine offshore Yokohama, Japan, after a passenger who disembarked in Hong Kong was confirmed as a coronavirus disease 2019 case. We performed whole-genome sequencing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) directly from PCR+ clinical specimens and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak. All tested isolates exhibited a transversion at G11083T, suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 dissemination on the Diamond Princess originated from a single introduction event before the quarantine started. Although further spreading might have been prevented by quarantine, some progeny clusters could be linked to transmission through mass-gathering events in the recreational areas and direct transmission among passengers who shared cabins during the quarantine. This study demonstrates the usefulness of haplotype network/phylogeny analysis in identifying potential infection routes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral , Haplotypes , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Ships , Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Quarantine , Whole Genome Sequencing
18.
Cell ; 181(4): 865-876.e12, 2020 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684968

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has highlighted the need for antiviral approaches that can target emerging viruses with no effective vaccines or pharmaceuticals. Here, we demonstrate a CRISPR-Cas13-based strategy, PAC-MAN (prophylactic antiviral CRISPR in human cells), for viral inhibition that can effectively degrade RNA from SARS-CoV-2 sequences and live influenza A virus (IAV) in human lung epithelial cells. We designed and screened CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) targeting conserved viral regions and identified functional crRNAs targeting SARS-CoV-2. This approach effectively reduced H1N1 IAV load in respiratory epithelial cells. Our bioinformatic analysis showed that a group of only six crRNAs can target more than 90% of all coronaviruses. With the development of a safe and effective system for respiratory tract delivery, PAC-MAN has the potential to become an important pan-coronavirus inhibition strategy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , RNA, Viral/antagonists & inhibitors , A549 Cells , Antibiotic Prophylaxis/methods , Base Sequence , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Computer Simulation , Conserved Sequence , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus/growth & development , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/growth & development , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , RNA Replicase/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
19.
Viruses ; 12(8)2020 07 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670832

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is the characterization and genomic tracing by phylogenetic analyses of 59 new SARS-CoV-2 Italian isolates obtained from patients attending clinical centres in North and Central Italy until the end of April 2020. All but one of the newly-characterized genomes belonged to the lineage B.1, the most frequently identified in European countries, including Italy. Only a single sequence was found to belong to lineage B. A mean of 6 nucleotide substitutions per viral genome was observed, without significant differences between synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, indicating genetic drift as a major source for virus evolution. tMRCA estimation confirmed the probable origin of the epidemic between the end of January and the beginning of February with a rapid increase in the number of infections between the end of February and mid-March. Since early February, an effective reproduction number (Re) greater than 1 was estimated, which then increased reaching the peak of 2.3 in early March, confirming the circulation of the virus before the first COVID-19 cases were documented. Continuous use of state-of-the-art methods for molecular surveillance is warranted to trace virus circulation and evolution and inform effective prevention and containment of future SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Bayes Theorem , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Epidemiological Monitoring , Genome, Viral , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Likelihood Functions , Molecular Epidemiology , Molecular Typing , Mutation , Phylogeny , Time Factors , Whole Genome Sequencing
20.
J Infect Dis ; 222(2): 223-233, 2020 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656287

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was discovered as a novel pathogen in the 2002-2003 SARS epidemic. The emergence and disappearance of this pathogen have brought questions regarding its source and evolution. Within the genome sequences of 281 SARS-CoVs, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and SARS-related CoVs (SARSr-CoVs), a ~430 bp genomic region (from 27 701 bp to 28 131 bp in AY390556.1) with regular variations was investigated. This ~430 bp region overlaps with the ORF8 gene and is prone to deletions and nucleotide substitutions. Its complexity suggested the need for a new genotyping method for coronaviruses related to SARS-similar coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, SARSr-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2). Bat SARSr-CoV presented 3 genotypes, of which type 0 is only seen in bat SARSr-CoV, type I is present in SARS in the early phase, and type II is found in all SARS-CoV-2. This genotyping also shows potential usage in distinguishing the SARS-similar coronaviruses from different hosts and geographic areas. This genomic region has important implications for predicting the epidemic trend and studying the evolution of coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral , SARS Virus/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics , Animals , Base Sequence , Chiroptera/virology , Eutheria/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Genes, Viral , Genetic Variation , Humans , Open Reading Frames , Phylogeny , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Deletion , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viverridae/virology
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