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1.
JAMA ; 327(12): 1131-1132, 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798085
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 658220, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771095

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The patient-doctor relationship has evolved from early paternalism to a consumerism and partnership model that emphasizes cooperation. Patient-doctor relationships might vary with the socio-cultural environment, because the medical environment affects such relationships. Method: We investigated the patient-doctor relationship among medical students through concept mapping analysis. Twenty-six fourth-grade Korean medical students wrote a reflection journal and participated in the concept classification and the importance evaluation of the derived concept. ALSCAL multidimensional scaling and Ward hierarchical cluster analysis were performed. Also, the 5-point Likert scale was used to evaluate the importance of the concept. Results: Sixty-six statements about the patient-doctor relationship were extracted and grouped into six clusters. The x-axis is the dimension of "Information-Respect," and the y-axis is "Changeability-Persistence." Six patient-doctor concepts were derived and students evaluated "Patient-centered" as the most important. Conclusions: Medical students express various concepts of the patient-doctor relationship. Considering that they may encounter various medical conditions and patients, it is necessary that they understand deeply the complex patient-doctor relationship.


Subject(s)
Physician-Patient Relations , Students, Medical , Humans , Republic of Korea
5.
Front Public Health ; 10: 808084, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753415

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of COVID-19 poses a challenge for obstetrics and gynecology (O&G) residents. In order to improve the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of residents in epidemic prevention and control, reduce work pressure and improve professional skills, effective and sound training models are required to improve the protection of O&G residents from COVID-19. Method: A total of 38 standardized training O&G residents working in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University in March 2020 was selected. They were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. The control group underwent a protection theory exposition according to the traditional training method, while the intervention group adopted a conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO) mode, arranged training courses in combination with the O&G specialty, and completed four modules of CDIO. After the training, the theoretical knowledge and practical operation were assessed, and the work stress and occupational identity scales were assessed. The assessment results and scores of the two groups of residents were analyzed. Results: Compared with the scores of the residents in the control group, the theoretical and technical scores of the residents in the intervention group significantly improved (P < 0.05). In the evaluation of organizational management, workload, interpersonal relationship, and doctor-patient relationship pressure, the scores of the intervention group were lower than those of the control group, with a statistical difference (P < 0.05). For the intervention group, the job stress and professional identity evaluation scores were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The CDIO model can effectively enhance the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of O&G residents in COVID-19 epidemic prevention protocols to reduce work pressure and improve professional identity. In addition, it provides new ideas, methods, and approaches for future clinical practice training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Physician-Patient Relations
6.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 31(3): 172-174, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745681
7.
BMJ Open ; 12(3): e058361, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741642

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the perceived quality of follow-up telephone consultations (TCs) from the perspective of patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) of multiple medical disciplines during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and reflexive thematic analysis. SETTING: Seven medical disciplines (general dermatology, dermato-oncology, head and neck oncology, internal medicine, medical oncology, gynaecological oncology and surgical oncology) at a large university hospital in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Patients who received and HCPs who provided TCs as a substitute for outpatient follow-up appointments during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Eighty-two patients and 58 HCPs were interviewed. Predominantly, patients and HCPs were satisfied with the quality of care by TCs. They regarded TCs as efficient, accessible and of acceptable quality, provided there was an established patient-HCP relationship, medical complaints were absent and physical examination was not indicated. However, most patients were worried about the accuracy of their health assessment in the absence of physical examination and non-verbal communication. Both patients and HCPs wish to use TCs in the future alternatively with face-to-face consultations. CONCLUSION: This study concludes that TCs seem a valuable contribution to the context of follow-up care and could partially replace face-to-face consultations. TCs can be performed in stable, chronic patients with whom a doctor-patient relationship has already been established. Face-to-face consultations are considered more appropriate in the case of new patients, challenging or emotionally charged consultations and when clinically relevant physical examination is indicated. Due to the context-dependent nature of experiences of patients and HCPs, TCs should be used with an individually customised approach based on patient and disease specifics, in which shared decision-making plays an extensive role. Before major implementation is considered, sufficient data on the safety regarding missed diagnoses or cancer recurrences should be assembled first.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
8.
CMAJ Open ; 10(1): E165-E172, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual care solutions have been rapidly adopted across the country to provide safe, quality care to diverse patient populations. The objective of this qualitative case study was to understand patient and caregiver experiences of virtual care to identify barriers and gather suggestions to address them. METHODS: In this patient-oriented project, we sought to understand gaps in virtual care experienced by patients and caregivers, using virtual focus groups. With the assistance of a patient research liaison, we engaged 2 patient partners as full partners; they participated in study conception, data collection, data analysis and knowledge translation. Recruitment was done through email by disseminating the study poster to 30 community organizations and health units in Ontario and British Columbia. We conducted a constructivist, qualitative study guided by grounded theory methodology. One researcher employed in-vivo coding, followed by axial coding with focus group participants, followed by selective coding with the study team. The study took place from November to December 2020. RESULTS: We conducted 6 focus groups with 13 patients and 5 caregivers. The analysis resulted in 6 major themes and 17 minor themes. Key findings showed that barriers related to access to technology and Internet, language and cultural differences were challenges to virtual care. Participants identified special considerations surrounding caregiver and family involvement; privacy, consent and confidentiality; and the patient-physician relationship. Participants suggested that technology and the Internet be universally accessible and that virtual care modalities be integrated (e.g., consolidated patient portal) to improve virtual care. INTERPRETATION: There are multiple patient-identified barriers to accessing virtual care in Canada; patients can provide insights into ways to address these barriers. Future research should include robust patient engagement to explore ways to address these challenges and barriers to ensure that virtual care can be equitable, accessible and safe for all users. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY: Although virtual care has been rapidly adopted and scaled up in health care institutions across the country, few improvements informed by patient and caregiver experiences have been made. Driven by concerns expressed by patient partners, our study team undertook a patient-partnered qualitative study to understand the barriers of virtual care from the perspectives and experiences of patients and caregivers. Our study team created the interview guide drawing from our previous patient-oriented qualitative studies and designed an orientation package to provide resources related to the focus groups and to introduce participants to the study team. Drawing from local health teams, clinics and patient advisory groups, the study team recruited 13 patients and 5 caregivers to participate in 6 focus group interviews. An analysis based on grounded theory was undertaken, with participation from both the study team and participants. Lack of access to technology or Internet and language barriers were determined to be the primary challenges in virtual care. Special considerations to caregiver and family involvement, privacy and confidentiality, as well as the patient-physician relationship were considered priorities to improving access to virtual care. Participants offered recommendations and potential solutions to address barriers and challenges in virtual care, which can serve to encourage large-scale policy and programmatic changes in patient-centred ways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , British Columbia , Caregivers , Communication Barriers , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario , Physician-Patient Relations , Qualitative Research , Young Adult
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(6): e28781, 2022 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684897

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is experiencing pandemic diffusion. The experience of an Italian private health care structure was reviewed.We retrospectively collected data about services provided in a single medium complexity private health care structure. Furthermore, we classified specialties within 4 categories, based on the performance of urgent non-deferrable services and possible provision of services without a necessary contact with the patient.The structure canceled/postponed almost every deferrable service, providing only 3% of services that could be performed without direct contact with patients. Regarding non-deferrable services requiring the presence of the patient, about 42% of booked services have been autonomously canceled/postponed by patients for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) fear. The administrative services have been remotely performed by smart working as far as possible.Private health care structures may safely continue to provide non-deferrable services while respecting the restrictive measures imposed by the government, encouraging telehealth and smart working modalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(2)2022 01 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635981

ABSTRACT

Trust in healthcare systems and physicians is considered important for the delivery of good healthcare. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random three-stage sample of the general population of Croatia (N = 1230), stratified by regions. Of respondents, 58.7% displayed a high or very high level of trust in the healthcare system, 65.6% in physicians, and 78.3% in their family physician. Respondents' views regarding patients' roles in the discussion of treatment options, confidence in physicians' expertise, and underlying motives of physicians were mixed. Respondents with a lower level of education, those with low monthly incomes, and those from smaller settlements had lower levels of trust in physicians and the healthcare system. Trust in other institutions, religiosity and religious beliefs, tolerance of personal choice, and experience of caring for the seriously ill and dying were predictors of trust in healthcare and physicians. Our findings suggest that levels of healthcare-related trust in Croatia are increasing in comparison with previous research, but need improvement. Levels of trust are lowest in populations that are most vulnerable and most in need of care and protection.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Trust , Croatia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Physicians, Family , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Camb Q Healthc Ethics ; 31(1): 105-118, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633826

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus crisis is causing considerable disruption and anguish. However, the COVID-19 pandemic and consequent explosion of telehealth services also provide an unparalleled opportunity to consider ethical, legal, and social issues (ELSI) beyond immediate needs. Ethicists, informaticians, and others can learn from experience, and evaluate information technology practices and evidence on which to base policy and standards, identify significant values and issues, and revise ethical guidelines. This paper builds on professional organizations' guidelines and ELSI scholarship to develop emerging concerns illuminated by current experience. Four ethical themes characterized previous literature: quality of care and the doctor-patient relationship, access, consent, and privacy. More attention is needed to these and to expanding the scope of ethical analysis to include health information technologies. An applied ethics approach to ELSI would addresses context-specific issues and the relationships between people and technologies, and facilitate effective and ethical institutionalization of telehealth and other health information technologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , Policy , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 255, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639582

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of the doctor-patient relationship (DPR) in China and possible influencing factors during the COVID-19 period from the patient's perspective. METHODS: An online survey was carried out nationwide from March 12, 2020 to March 30, 2020 in China via a convenience sampling strategy. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were invited to complete a questionnaire regarding the quality of DPR, including sociodemographic information, the Patient-Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9), and influencing factors for DPR during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 1903 patients were included. Our result showed that participants had a higher PDRQ-9 score during the COVID-19 pandemic (4.18 ± 0.51) than that before the COVID-19 pandemic (3.86 ± 0.67). Importance-performance analysis (IPA) revealed that doctor-patient communication, patient satisfaction, consultation time, doctor's attitude, and medical knowledge were specific aspects that needed to be prioritized to improve the DPR. Multiple linear regression analysis suggested that positive media reports, telemedicine, and national policies had a significantly positive effect on the DPR during the pandemic (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: In general, the DPR had been improved during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our research found the key points that needed to be prioritized to improve the DPR during the pandemic, which may provide effective suggestions for building a harmonious DPR in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communication , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Lancet ; 398(10312): 1680-1681, 2021 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621109
15.
Lancet ; 398(10314): 1868-1869, 2021 11 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616827
16.
Acta Orthop ; 93: 198-205, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607747

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose - Facemasks play a role in preventing the respiratory spread of SARS-CoV-2, but their impact on the physician-patient relationship in the orthopedic outpatient clinic is unclear. We investigated whether the type of surgeons' facemask impacts patients' perception of the physician-patient relationship, influences their understanding of what the surgeon said, or affects their perceived empathy. Patients and methods - All patients with an appointment in the orthopedic outpatient clinic of a tertiary university hospital during the 2-week study period were included. During consultations, all surgeons wore a non-transparent (first study week) or transparent facemask (second study week). Results of 285 of 407 eligible patients were available for analysis. The doctor-patient relationship was evaluated using the standardized Patient Reactions Assessment (PRA) and a 10-point Likert-scale questionnaire ranging from 0 (strongly disagree) to 10 (strongly agree). Results - A non-transparent facemask led to more restrictions in the physician-patient communication and a worse understanding of what the surgeon said. Patients' understanding improved with a transparent facemask with greatest improvements reported by patients aged 65 years and older (non-transparent: 6 [IQR 5-10] vs. transparent: 10 [IQR 9-10], p < 0.001) and by patients with a self-reported hearing impairment (non-transparent: 7 [IQR 3-7] vs. transparent: 9 [IQR 9-10], p < 0.001). The median PRA score was higher when surgeons wore a transparent facemask (p= 0.003). Interpretation - Surgeons' non-transparent facemasks pose a new communication barrier that can negatively affect the physician-patient relationship. While emotional factors like affectivity and empathy seem to be less affected overall, the physician-patient communication and patients' understanding of what the surgeon said seem to be negatively affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Equipment Design , Masks , Orthopedic Surgeons , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physician-Patient Relations , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
N Engl J Med ; 386(1): 7-9, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604986
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