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3.
Arch Ital Urol Androl ; 93(4): 450-454, 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622683

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine has been adopted successfully in various urological scenarios. The aim of the present study was to explore attitudes and perceptions by urology residents toward the use of telementoring in the context of residents-faculty physicians communication for patient-related care. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 19 multiple choice questions was designed including three sections: respondents' demographics, attitudes and perceptions towards the use of telementoring. Invitations to participate in this anonymous survey were e-mailed to urology residents at University of Naples Federico II. RESULTS: In total 60 responses were received (participation rate 86%). The frequency of telementoring use was described as occasional, frequent, very frequent, and rare by 51,3%, 41.0%, 5,1%, and 2,6% of respondents, respectively. WhatsApp messenger was used by 89.5% of respondents and photos were the most common type of media content shared (73.7%). Most of respondents declared a moderate and a strong agreement with respect to the utility of telementoring in improving the communication in relation to the interpretation of clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and functional findings. Overall, 78% of participants individuated risks of information flow distortions and misinterpretations as the major limit of telementoring. CONCLUSIONS: The use of telementoring is widespread and perceived as useful by urology residents in the context of residentsfaculty physicians communication in multiple settings of patientrelated care.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Physicians , Urology , Attitude , Communication , Faculty , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urology/education
5.
Clin Invest Med ; 44(3): E72-79, 2021 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605831

Subject(s)
Physicians , Humans
6.
Emerg Med J ; 39(2): 94-99, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604109

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the relative importance members of the US public place on different patient attributes in triage decisions about who should receive the last available intensive care unit (ICU) bed. METHODS: A discrete choice experiment was conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2000 respondents from the YouGov internet panel of US households. Respondents chose which of three hypothetical patients with COVID-19 should receive an ICU bed if only one were available. The three patients differed in age, gender, Alzheimer's-like disability and probability of survival if the patient received the ICU bed. An experimental design varied the values of the four attributes of the three hypothetical patients with COVID-19 that a respondent saw in four choice tasks. RESULTS: The most important patient attribute to respondents was the probability the patient survives COVID-19 if they get the ICU bed (OR CI: 4.41 to 6.91). There was heterogeneity among different age groups of respondents about how much age of the patient mattered. Respondents under 30 years of age were more likely to choose young patients and old patients, and less likely to select patients aged 40-60 years old. For respondents in the age group 30-49 years old, as the age of the patient declined, their preference for saving the patient declined modestly in a linear fashion. CONCLUSIONS: Respondents favoured giving the last ICU bed available to the patient with the highest probability of surviving COVID-19. Public opinion suggests a simple guideline for physician choices based on likelihood of survival as opposed to the number of life-years saved. There was heterogeneity among respondents of different age groups for allocating the last ICU bed, as well as to the importance of the patient having an Alzheimer's-like disability (where religion of the respondent is important) and the gender of the patient (where the gender and racial identity are important).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Adult , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
8.
Lancet ; 398(10303): 920-930, 2021 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593950

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has heightened interest in how physician mental health can be protected and optimised, but uncertainty and misinformation remain about some key issues. In this Review, we discuss the current literature, which shows that despite what might be inferred during training, physicians are not immune to mental illness, with between a quarter and a third reporting increased symptoms of mental ill health. Physicians, particularly female physicians, are at an increased risk of suicide. An emerging consensus exists that some aspects of physician training, working conditions, and organisational support are unacceptable. Changes in medical training and health systems, and the additional strain of working through a pandemic, might have amplified these problems. A new evidence-informed framework for how individual and organisational interventions can be used in an integrated manner in medical schools, in health-care settings, and by professional colleagues is proposed. New initiatives are required at each of these levels, with an urgent need for organisational-level interventions, to better protect the mental health and wellbeing of physicians.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Pandemics , Physicians, Women/psychology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Suicide/prevention & control , Work Schedule Tolerance
10.
Epilepsy Behav ; 126: 108487, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586249

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the unwillingness of physicians involved in epilepsy care to continue telemedicine during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Japan. METHOD: This was a national-level cross-sectional survey initiated by Japan Young Epilepsy Section (YES-Japan) which is a national chapter of The Young Epilepsy Section of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE-YES). We asked physicians who conducted telemedicine in patients with epilepsy (PWE) during the COVID-19 pandemic at four clinics and 21 hospitals specializing in epilepsy care in Japan from March 1 to April 30, 2021. The following data were collected: (1) participant profile, (2) characteristics of PWE treated by telemedicine, and (3) contents and environmental factors of telemedicine. Statistically significant variables (p < 0.05) in the univariate analysis were analyzed in a multivariate binary logistic regression model to detect the independently associated factors with the unwillingness to continue telemedicine. RESULT: Among the 115 respondents (response rate: 64%), 89 were included in the final analysis. Of them, 60 (67.4%) were willing to continue telemedicine, and 29 (32.6%) were unwilling. In the univariate binary logistic regression analysis, age (Odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-3.09, p = 0.02), psychiatrist (OR = 5.88, 95% CI 2.15-16.08, p = 0.001), hospital (OR = 0.10, 95% CI 0.01-0.94, p = 0.04), the number of COVID-19 risk factors in the participant (OR = 2.88, 95% CI 1.46-5.69, p = 0.002), the number of COVID-19 risk factors in the cohabitants (OR = 2.52, 95% CI 1.05-6.01, p = 0.04), COVID-19 epidemic area (OR = 4.37, 95% CI 1.18-16.20, p = 0.03), consultation time during telemedicine (OR = 2.51, 95% CI 1.32-4.76, p = 0.005), workload due to telemedicine (OR = 4.17, 95% CI 2.11-8.24, p < 0.001) were statistically significant. In the multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, workload due to telemedicine (OR = 4.93, 95% CI 1.96-12.35) was independently associated with the unwillingness to continue telemedicine. CONCLUSION: This national-level cross-sectional survey found that workload due to telemedicine among physicians involved in epilepsy care was independently associated with the unwillingness to continue telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Physicians , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 647543, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581138

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to describe the dealings of 20 biomedical doctors with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in the Sindh province of Pakistan. Focusing on physicians from three different hospitals, we describe their challenges, emotions, and views concerning the pandemic. Many regarded the virus from a biomedical standpoint. Yet some also perceived it as a "tool of a proxy war" and a "plot," without giving agency to anyone for that "plot." Furthermore, these care providers faced a great fear of infection and an even greater fear of transmitting the virus to their families and friends. A few also feared stigmatization as viral carriers. Whether they experienced fear or not, all of our physician interlocutors emphasized their sense of responsibility to "serve humanity," yet some also expressed a strong belief in the inevitability of the will of Allah. Some were satisfied with the role of the government in containing the virus, while others expressed concerns and felt that the government should be doing much more. All expressed confidence in the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), viewing it as an effective buffer against viral contagion. We conclude with a call for further research especially ethnographic studies on dealings of physicians with COVID-19 across Pakistan as frontline care providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Fear , Health Personnel , Humans , Pakistan/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580727

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study was conducted in critical care units and emergency services and was aimed at considering the death notification (DN) phenomenology among physicians (notifiers), patient relatives (receivers) and those who work between them (nurses). Through the qualitative method, a systemic perspective was adopted to recognise three different categories of representation: 23 clinicians, 13 nurses and 11 family members of COVID-19 victims were interviewed, totalling 47 people from all over Italy (25 females, mean age: 46,36; SD: 10,26). With respect to notifiers, the following themes emerged: the changes in the relational dimension, protective factors and difficulties related to DN. With respect to receivers, the hospital was perceived as a prison, bereavement between DN, lost rituals and continuing bonds. Among nurses, changes in the relational dimension, protective factors and the impact of the death. Some common issues between physicians and nurses were relational difficulties in managing distancing and empathy and the support of relatives and colleagues. The perspective of receivers showed suffering related to loss and health care professionals' inefficacy in communication. Specifically, everyone considered DNs mismanaged because of the COVID-19 emergency. Some considerations inherent in death education for DN management among health professionals were presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580721

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has confronted emergency and critical care physicians with unprecedented ethically challenging situations. The aim of this paper was to explore physicians' experience of moral distress during the pandemic. A qualitative multicenter study was conducted using grounded theory. We recruited 15 emergency and critical care physicians who worked in six hospitals from the Lombardy region of Italy. Semi-structured interviews about their professional experience of moral distress were conducted from November 2020-February 2021 (1 year after the pandemic outbreak). The transcripts were qualitatively analyzed following open, axial, and selective coding. A model of moral distress was generated around the core category of Being a Good Doctor. Several Pandemic Stressors threatened the sense of Being a Good Doctor, causing moral distress. Pandemic Stressors included limited healthcare resources, intensified patient triage, changeable selection criteria, limited therapeutic/clinical knowledge, and patient isolation. Emotions of Moral Distress included powerlessness, frustration/anger, and sadness. Physicians presented different Individual Responses to cope with moral distress, such as avoidance, acquiescence, reinterpretation, and resistance. These Individual Responses generated different Moral Outcomes, such as moral residue, disengagement, or moral integrity. The Working Environment, especially the team and organizational culture, was instrumental in restoring or disrupting moral integrity. In order for physicians to manage moral distress successfully, it was important to use reinterpretation, that is, to find new ways of enacting their own values by reframing morally distressing situations, and to perceive a cooperative and supportive Working Environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Grounded Theory , Humans , Morals , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 620-625, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579391

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Physicians across the world have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was designed and conducted to assess the emotional and behavioural reactions of physicians to the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: An online survey questionnaire using the google forms platform was constructed by the authors. The items in the questionnaire were based on clinical experience, relevant literature review and discussion with peers. A list of issues that were deemed as essential components of the experience of the pandemic relevant to physicians was arrived at. Thereafter these issues were operationalized into question form and hosted on the google forms platform. The link to this questionnaire was circulated by the authors among their peer groups in the month of April 2020. RESULTS: We received 295 responses and 3 were unusable. Most of the responses were from India, the United States of America, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. About 60% of the respondents identified themselves as frontline and had a decade of clinical experience. Most respondents reported being anxious due to the pandemic and also observed the same in their peers and families. A majority also observed changes in behaviour in self and others and advanced a variety of reasons and concerns. A sense of duty was the most commonly employed coping mechanism. CONCLUSION: Physicians are not immune from information and misinformation, or cues in the environment. Behavioural choices are not always predicted by knowledge but by a combination of knowledge, emotional state, personality and environment. Healthcare settings need to be ready for emergencies and should focus on reducing uncertainty in physicians. These factors may also be gainfully used in the mental health promotion of physicians in COVID-19 care roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e22841, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Misdiagnosis, arbitrary charges, annoying queues, and clinic waiting times among others are long-standing phenomena in the medical industry across the world. These factors can contribute to patient anxiety about misdiagnosis by clinicians. However, with the increasing growth in use of big data in biomedical and health care communities, the performance of artificial intelligence (Al) techniques of diagnosis is improving and can help avoid medical practice errors, including under the current circumstance of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to visualize and measure patients' heterogeneous preferences from various angles of AI diagnosis versus clinicians in the context of the COVID-19 epidemic in China. We also aim to illustrate the different decision-making factors of the latent class of a discrete choice experiment (DCE) and prospects for the application of AI techniques in judgment and management during the pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 and in the future. METHODS: A DCE approach was the main analysis method applied in this paper. Attributes from different dimensions were hypothesized: diagnostic method, outpatient waiting time, diagnosis time, accuracy, follow-up after diagnosis, and diagnostic expense. After that, a questionnaire is formed. With collected data from the DCE questionnaire, we apply Sawtooth software to construct a generalized multinomial logit (GMNL) model, mixed logit model, and latent class model with the data sets. Moreover, we calculate the variables' coefficients, standard error, P value, and odds ratio (OR) and form a utility report to present the importance and weighted percentage of attributes. RESULTS: A total of 55.8% of the respondents (428 out of 767) opted for AI diagnosis regardless of the description of the clinicians. In the GMNL model, we found that people prefer the 100% accuracy level the most (OR 4.548, 95% CI 4.048-5.110, P<.001). For the latent class model, the most acceptable model consists of 3 latent classes of respondents. The attributes with the most substantial effects and highest percentage weights are the accuracy (39.29% in general) and expense of diagnosis (21.69% in general), especially the preferences for the diagnosis "accuracy" attribute, which is constant across classes. For class 1 and class 3, people prefer the AI + clinicians method (class 1: OR 1.247, 95% CI 1.036-1.463, P<.001; class 3: OR 1.958, 95% CI 1.769-2.167, P<.001). For class 2, people prefer the AI method (OR 1.546, 95% CI 0.883-2.707, P=.37). The OR of levels of attributes increases with the increase of accuracy across all classes. CONCLUSIONS: Latent class analysis was prominent and useful in quantifying preferences for attributes of diagnosis choice. People's preferences for the "accuracy" and "diagnostic expenses" attributes are palpable. AI will have a potential market. However, accuracy and diagnosis expenses need to be taken into consideration.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Diagnosis , Patient Preference , Physicians , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , China , Choice Behavior , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/economics , Female , Health Expenditures , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Young Adult
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572458

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to gain an uncensored insight into the most difficult aspects of working as a frontline doctor across successive COVID-19 pandemic waves. Data collected by the parent study (CERA) was analysed using conventional content analysis. Participants comprised frontline doctors who worked in emergency, anaesthetic, and intensive care medicine in the UK and Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic (n = 1379). All seniority levels were represented, 42.8% of the sample were male, and 69.2% were white. Four themes were identified with nine respective categories (in parentheses): (1) I'm not a COVID hero, I'm COVID cannon fodder (exposed and unprotected, "a kick in the teeth"); (2) the relentlessness and pervasiveness of COVID ("no respite", "shifting sands"); (3) the ugly truths of the frontline ("inhumane" care, complex team dynamics); (4) an overwhelmed system exacerbated by COVID (overstretched and under-resourced, constant changes and uncertainty, the added hinderance of infection control measures). Findings reflect the multifaceted challenges faced after successive pandemic waves; basic wellbeing needs continue to be neglected and the emotional impact is further pronounced. Steps are necessary to mitigate the repeated trauma exposure of frontline doctors as COVID-19 becomes endemic and health services attempt to recover with inevitable long-term sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561834

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Workplace silence impedes productivity, job satisfaction and retention, key issues for the hospital workforce worldwide. It can have a negative effect on patient outcomes and safety and human resources in healthcare organisations. This study aims to examine factors that influence workplace silence among hospital doctors in Ireland. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A national, cross-sectional, online survey of hospital doctors in Ireland was conducted in October-November 2019; 1,070 hospital doctors responded. This paper focuses on responses to the question "If you had concerns about your working conditions, would you raise them?". In total, 227 hospital doctor respondents (25%) stated that they would not raise concerns about their working conditions. Qualitative thematic analysis was carried out on free-text responses to explore why these doctors choose to opt for silence regarding their working conditions. FINDINGS: Reputational risk, lack of energy and time, a perceived inability to effect change and cultural norms all discourage doctors from raising concerns about working conditions. Apathy arose as change to working conditions was perceived as highly unlikely. In turn, this had scope to lead to neglect and exit. Voice was seen as risky for some respondents, who feared that complaining could damage their career prospects and workplace relationships. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study highlights the systemic, cultural and practical issues that pressure hospital doctors in Ireland to opt for silence around working conditions. It adds to the literature on workplace silence and voice within the medical profession and provides a framework for comparative analysis of doctors' silence and voice in other settings.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Workplace , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Ireland
18.
J Health Organ Manag ; 35(9): 195-210, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561215

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study seeks to improve the understanding of physician leaders' leadership work challenges. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The subjects of the empirical study were physician leaders (n = 23) in the largest central hospital in Finland. FINDINGS: A total of five largely identity-related, partially paradoxical dilemmas appeared regarding why working as "just a leader" is challenging for physician leaders. First, the dilemma of identity ambiguity between being a physician and a leader. Second, the dilemma of balancing the expected commitment to clinical patient work by various stakeholders and that of physician leadership work. Third, the dilemma of being able to compensate for leadership skill shortcomings by excelling in clinical skills, encouraging physician leaders to commit to patient work. Fourth, the dilemma of "medic discourse", that is, downplaying leadership work as "non-patient work", making it inferior to patient work. Fifth, the dilemma of a perceived ethical obligation to commit to patient work even if the physician leadership work would be a full-time job. The first two issues support the findings of earlier research, while the remaining three emerging from the authors' analysis are novel. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The authors list some of the practical implications that follow from this study and which could help solve some of the challenges. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study explores physician leaders' leadership work challenges using authentic physician leader data in a context where no prior empirical research has been carried out.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Physicians , Clinical Competence , Employment , Finland , Humans
19.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 34(1): 101-106, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555739

ABSTRACT

Dr. Emanuel Papper, the founding chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology at Columbia University, was passionate about research, training, and innovation. At an event held in his honor on March 20, 2021, experts came together to discuss the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and its myriad challenges. Dr. Wellington Sun, MD, of Vaxcellerant LLC, an expert in infectious disease and vaccine research and development, presented a "Primer of COVID-19 vaccines for the perioperative physician." Operation Warp Speed was successful in producing multiple efficacious and safe vaccines for use in the United States and around the globe. Their development and authorization for emergency use occurred in an unprecedented timespan of <1 year. Technology such as V-SAFE has helped to accrue extensive postdevelopment safety data that will be utilized for licensure of these vaccines. The COVID-19 vaccine success is tempered by the knowledge that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 continues its natural selection of variants that threaten the efficacy of vaccines. Important questions remain regarding the future of the COVID-19 pandemic, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 variants, successful vaccination strategies, and preparedness for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 34(1): 152-157, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the United States, New York State's health care system experienced unprecedented stress as an early epicenter of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study aims to assess the level of hopelessness in New York State physicians working on the frontlines during the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A confidential online survey sent to New York State health care workers by the state health commissioner's office was used to gather demographic and hopelessness data as captured by a brief Hopelessness Scale. Adjusted linear regression models were used to assess the associations of physician age, sex, and number of triage decisions made, with level of hopelessness. RESULTS: In total, 1330 physicians were included, of whom 684 were male (51.4%). Their average age was 52.4 years (SD=12.7), with the majority of respondents aged 50 years and older (55.2%). Almost half of the physician respondents (46.3%) worked directly with COVID-19 patients, and 163 (12.3%) were involved in COVID-19-related triage decisions. On adjusted analysis, physicians aged 40 to 49 years had significantly higher levels of hopelessness compared with those aged 50 years or more (µ=0.441, SD=0.152, P=0.004). Those involved in 1 to 5 COVID-19-related triage decisions had a significantly lower mean hopelessness score (µ=-0.572, SD=0.208, P=0.006) compared with physicians involved in none of these decisions. CONCLUSION: Self-reported hopelessness was significantly higher among physicians aged 40 to 49 years and those who had not yet been involved in a life or death triage decision. Further work is needed to identify strategies to support physicians at high risk for adverse mental health outcomes during public health emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Aged , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
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