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1.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 271-273, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462200

ABSTRACT

In recent years, the medical literature from a wide range of medical specialities has exploded with publications on the theme of emotional distress, stress and burnout in the practice of medicine. Improving the work-life of health care providers is necessary to optimise health system performance. COVID-19 has caused considerable additional pressure on health services across Europe and there have been calls for interventions to address the psychological and occupational stress caused by the pandemic. Although there is an ongoing need to monitor these factors among family physicians, and other staff working in primary care across Europe, we must also identify supports and promote them. Further research is needed to explore causative factors and provide convincing evidence in relation to effective interventions.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Physicians, Family/psychology , Psychological Distress , Europe , Humans , Stress, Psychological
2.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 184-190, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals (HCPs) in family medicine (FM) in Croatia work in a demanding environment caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Besides particular circumstances in healthcare, an unknown virus, social distancing, and homeschooling, the capital was hit with the earthquake during the lockdown. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the influence of demographic characteristics, professional differences, medical history, and specific stressors on the psychological outcomes. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the online questionnaire containing the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) was conducted from 1st to 15 May 2020 in FM. RESULTS: HCPs (534, 35% response rate), predominantly female (84.5%), participated in the research. High prevalence of stress (30.9%), anxiety (33.1%), depression (30.7%), and PTSD (33.0%) were found. Female participants had higher results in the anxiety subscale of DASS-21 and IES-R scores. Pre-existing conditions were associated with higher levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. The IES-R score for PTSD showed borderline correlation (p = 0.053) with working in regions with the highest incidence of COVID-19. Having schoolchildren made a difference on a stress subscale in DASS-21 (p < 0.043), but the earthquake did not have an impact. CONCLUSION: Family physicians and nurses in FM in Croatia are under a great mental load during the COVID-19 outbreak. Results suggest that HCPs of the female sex, with pre-existing chronic conditions, work in regions with a high incidence of SARS-CoV-2 or have schoolchildren at greater risk of the poor psychological outcome.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Physicians, Family/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Croatia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Disasters , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Earthquakes , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Prevalence , Psychological Tests , Risk Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(3): 522-530, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has spread rapidly, with vast global implications. This study assessed how family physicians in Kansas were responding to COVID-19 and the effects of the pandemic on their well-being. METHODS: The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of 113 family physicians in Kansas between May 22, 2020 and June 25, 2020. The study participants completed an anonymous, 36-item survey assessing their concerns about being exposed to COVID-19 and levels of personal depression, anxiety, stress, and burnout in addition to demographic information. RESULTS: There was a 45.6% response rate, with 50.4% (n = 57) of the respondents reporting manifestations of burnout. The physicians who personally treated any presumptive or confirmed COVID-19 patient, compared with those who did not, were more likely to report at least 1 manifestation of burnout, experience emotional exhaustion, and feel a higher level of personal stress. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic may be taking an emotional toll on family physicians in Kansas. This study provides a baseline from which to continue further monitoring of outcomes. Data can help drive initiatives at local, state, and national levels to help diminish the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physicians.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Physicians, Family/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Kansas/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Fam Med ; 53(3): 207-210, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136697

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: With the emergence of COVID-19, telemedicine use has increased dramatically as clinicians and patients have looked for alternatives to face-to-face care. Prior research has shown high levels of patient satisfaction and comparable quality of care. Video visits have been hypothesized to be one way to reduce burnout among clinicians, but there has been minimal research on physician views of virtual care. We sought to measure family physician experience with video visits at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We identified all faculty and resident physicians at a large academic department of family medicine who had conducted a video visit in the prior month and conducted an anonymous online 12-question survey about their experiences, satisfaction, and barriers with care. RESULTS: Most eligible physicians responded (102/109, 94%), of whom half (52%) reported this was their first month trying a video visit. There was very high satisfaction (91% very or somewhat satisfied). The majority of respondents felt that video visits were shorter (54%) or took the same amount of time (38%) as in-person visits. There was concern that many physicians had experienced a visit in which they felt video was not the appropriate platform given patient concerns. CONCLUSIONS: This study is among the first to assess physician experience with video visits. As the visits are perceived as shorter, they may offer a unique opportunity to address clinician burnout. There was a high level of satisfaction at our institution despite multiple technical challenges.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians, Family/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Physicians, Family/psychology , United States
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090335

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, family physicians (FPs) are the backbone of the healthcare system with considerable impact on the general population, and their well-being is of great importance. The aim of this investigation was to assess FPs mental health, as well as knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) regarding the pandemic, and opinions on non-communicable disease (NCD) health care provided to patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 613 FPs. Anxiety and depression levels were estimated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, subjective perceived stress with the Perceived Stress Scale, while trauma-related symptoms were assessed using the Impact on Event Scale-COVID19. KAPs toward the pandemic and opinions regarding NCD patients were evaluated with questionnaires accordingly. Results have shown that age (ß = -0.02, p = 0.013) and personal risk of COVID­19 (ß = 1.05, p < 0.001) were significant independent correlates of the knowledge score. A total of 87.7% FPs expressed moderate/high perceived stress, 45.2% moderate/severe trauma-related symptoms, 60.4% borderline/abnormal anxiety levels, and 52.4% borderline/abnormal depression levels. Knowledge score was an independent predictor of perceived stress (ß = -0.33, p = 0.023) and anxiety (ß = -0.31, p = 0.006) levels. Limited accessibility to healthcare services and decreased number of newly-diagnosed NCD cases were mostly agreed on. The pandemic puts a considerable strain on FPs mental health, as well as on public health measures, due to the decreased overall quality of NCD patient health care. Educational programs may bridge the gaps between FPs' knowledge. Thus lowering anxiety and improving patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physicians, Family/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 12(1): e1-e3, 2020 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073598

ABSTRACT

The older persons in our society are a special group of people in need of additional measures of care and protection. They have medical, financial, emotional and social needs. The novel Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) only exacerbates those needs. COVID-19 is a new disease, and there is limited information regarding the disease. Based on currently available information, older persons and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Family physicians provide care for individuals across their lifespan. Because geriatricians are internists or family physicians with post-residency training in geriatric medicine, they are major stakeholders in geriatric care. The authors are concerned about the absence of a COVID-19 response guideline/special advisory targeting the vulnerable population of older adults. The management and response to COVID-19 will be implemented in part based on the local context of available resources. Nigeria has been described as a resource-constrained nation. Infection prevention in older persons in Nigeria will far outweigh the possibilities of treatment given limited resources. The aim was to recommend actionable strategies to prevent COVID-19-related morbidity or mortality among older persons in Nigeria and to promote their overall well-being during and after the pandemic. These recommendations cut across the geriatric medicine domains of physical health, mental health, functioning ability and socio-environmental situation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Policy , Health Services for the Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physicians, Family/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Aged , COVID-19 , Humans , Nigeria/epidemiology
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