Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
Can J Anaesth ; 67(10): 1417-1423, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1777840

ABSTRACT

Symptom management and end-of-life care are core skills for all physicians, although in ordinary times many anesthesiologists have fewer occasions to use these skills. The current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused significant mortality over a short time and has necessitated an increase in provision of both critical care and palliative care. For anesthesiologists deployed to units caring for patients with COVID-19, this narrative review provides guidance on conducting goals of care discussions, withdrawing life-sustaining measures, and managing distressing symptoms.


RéSUMé: La prise en charge des symptômes et les soins de fin de vie sont des compétences de base pour tous les médecins, bien qu'en temps ordinaire, de nombreux anesthésiologistes n'ont que peu d'occasions de mettre en pratique ces compétences. La pandémie actuelle de coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) a provoqué un taux de mortalité significatif dans un court intervalle et a nécessité une augmentation des besoins en soins intensifs et en soins palliatifs. Destiné aux anesthésiologistes déployés dans les unités prenant soin de patients atteints de la COVID-19, ce compte rendu narratif offre des recommandations quant à la façon de mener les discussions à propos des objectifs de soins, du retrait des thérapies de soutien vital, et de la prise en charge de symptômes de détresse.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Terminal Care/organization & administration , Anesthesiologists/organization & administration , Anesthesiologists/standards , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Care/standards , Humans , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Physicians/organization & administration , Physicians/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Terminal Care/standards , Withholding Treatment
2.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 947-950, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364847

ABSTRACT

While advances in science and technology continue to be at the forefront of the evolution of medical practice, the 21st century is also undergoing a unique and profound cultural shift that is changing the very nature of what it means to be a medical professional, namely humankind's transition to an information-based internet society. Medical care will increasingly depend on computer-generated probabilities guided and supported by a growing variety of individuals in health care-related professions, including statisticians, technologists, and information managers. Perhaps the biggest challenge to the profession will come from the erosion of professional autonomy, driven by smart machines, social networks, and internet search engines. As a result of these and other changes, physicians are facing a systematic loss of control, often without the direct input and leadership of the profession itself. In this commentary, the author urges the profession to adopt several strategies, including shifting its focus from reimbursement to the care patients value most, meaningfully addressing critical issues in health policy, becoming the definitive source for publicly available medical information, reimagining medical education, and overhauling the existing accreditation and licensing systems. Medical education must go beyond a focus on physicians whose professional identity revolves around being the exclusive source of medical knowledge. In the digitized 21st century, medical education should emphasize the centrality of the humanistic interface with patients such that the doctor-patient relationship is paramount in the complex medical world of machines and social media. Removing the roadblocks to successful professional reform is no small task, but the process can begin with a grassroots movement that empowers physicians and facilitates organizational and behavioral change. Failure to take action may well hasten the diminishment of patient care and the profession's trusted role in society.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/history , Medical Informatics/instrumentation , Medicine/instrumentation , Physician-Patient Relations/ethics , Physicians/organization & administration , Access to Information , Accreditation/methods , Accreditation/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/methods , Empowerment , Health Policy , History, 21st Century , Humans , Knowledge , Leadership , Medical Informatics/legislation & jurisprudence , Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Professional Autonomy , Social Networking
3.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 954-957, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364834

ABSTRACT

Machine learning (ML) algorithms are powerful prediction tools with immense potential in the clinical setting. There are a number of existing clinical tools that use ML, and many more are in development. Physicians are important stakeholders in the health care system, but most are not equipped to make informed decisions regarding deployment and application of ML technologies in patient care. It is of paramount importance that ML concepts are integrated into medical curricula to position physicians to become informed consumers of the emerging tools employing ML. This paradigm shift is similar to the evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement of the 1990s. At that time, EBM was a novel concept; now, EBM is considered an essential component of medical curricula and critical to the provision of high-quality patient care. ML has the potential to have a similar, if not greater, impact on the practice of medicine. As this technology continues its inexorable march forward, educators must continue to evaluate medical curricula to ensure that physicians are trained to be informed stakeholders in the health care of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Evidence-Based Medicine/history , Machine Learning/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Algorithms , COVID-19 Testing/instrumentation , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Clinical Trials as Topic , Curriculum/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Diabetic Retinopathy/diagnosis , Diagnostic Imaging/instrumentation , Female , History, 20th Century , Humans , Liability, Legal , Male , Physician-Patient Relations/ethics , Physicians/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration/legislation & jurisprudence
4.
Healthc Q ; 24(2): 33-37, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323455

ABSTRACT

Physician engagement is an important factor in improving care quality and patient safety, but engaging physicians is not easy. Winston Churchill's famous assertion about never wasting a crisis has defined the approach taken by many leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper describes three case studies of successful physician engagement across the continuum of acute care, chronic care and primary care settings during the pandemic. These examples offer insights on physician engagement within unique settings by leveraging intrinsic motivators and Spurgeon's model of medical engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Physicians/organization & administration , Stakeholder Participation , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Primary Health Care/organization & administration
7.
Tex Med ; 116(12): 26-31, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1103001

ABSTRACT

Even though COVID-19 vaccines are closer than ever to use by the general public, many questions remain about how they will be distributed to Texas physicians - and how they'll be received by Texans. That's why TMA in October weighed in on the state's distribution plan with recommendations to help ensure COVID-19 vaccines are not only distributed effectively and efficiently, but also seen as trusted tools in the fight against the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Physicians , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Physicians/organization & administration , Texas
8.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37(Suppl 1): 44, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069977

ABSTRACT

Unlike developed countries which have purely intensivists also called critical care physicians or intensive care physicians to manage critically ill patients like those with severe forms of COVID-19, the practice of critical care medicine in Africa is coined to anaesthesiology. Hence, anaesthesiologist-intensivist physicians are the medical specialists taking care of critically ill COVID-19 patients in Africa. Likewise, unlike intensive care units (ICUs) in high income countries, those in most African countries face the challenge of a lack of emergency drugs and resuscitation equipment, limited health infrastructure and understaffed and underfunded health care systems. The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented one faced by intensivists in high-income countries and anaesthesiologist-intensivist phycisians in Africa. Infected patients with severe forms of the disease like those having grave COVID-19 complications like massive pulmonary embolism, severe cardiac arrhythmias, cardiogenic shock, septic shock, acute kidney injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome require ICU admission for better management. Both intensivists or anaesthesiologist-intensivist physicians have the peculiarity of securing the airways of critically COVID-19 patients and providing respiratory support with mechanical ventilation after laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation when needed. In so doing, they can easily be infected from respiratory droplets or aerosols expired by the COVID-19 patients. Hence, in Africa, anaesthesiologist-intensivist phycisians have a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 compared to other health professionals. It's worth to mention that the COVID-19 pandemic struck African anaesthesiologist-intensivist phycisians and ICUs when there were neither prepared skillfully or lacked the required ICU capacity to meet the demands of thousands of severe COVID-19 African patients. These further weakened the already strained health systems in Africa. It required a lot of creativity, engineering skills and courage for these ill prepared African anaesthesiologist-intensivist physicians to provide care to these critically ill patients and improve their outcomes as the pandemic progressed. However, despites the numerous efforts made in African anaesthesiologist-Intensivist phycisians to care for critically ill COVID-19 patients, the pandemic is spreading at a rapid rate across Africa. There is an urgent need for African health authorities to anticipate on how to scale up the future high ICU capacity needs and limited ICU workforce, infrastructure and equipment to manage severe forms of COVID-19 in future. It cannot be overemphasized that these severe forms of COVID-19 are potentially fatal and are a major contributor to the death toll of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists/organization & administration , COVID-19/therapy , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Physicians/organization & administration , Africa , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Critical Care/organization & administration , Critical Illness , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Developing Countries , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Occupational Exposure
9.
Am J Manag Care ; 26(12): 499-500, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976752

ABSTRACT

This article describes the tension that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic brought up between administrators and physicians and offers a potential set of solutions to deal with it.


Subject(s)
Administrative Personnel/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Leadership , Physicians/organization & administration , Administrative Personnel/economics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Community-Institutional Relations , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Physicians/economics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(3): 307-309, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966437

ABSTRACT

Under the direction of U.S. Northern Command for COVID-19 pandemic response efforts, approximately 500 Navy Reserve medical professionals were deployed to the New York City area from April to June 2020. Some of these providers were asked to serve in 11 overburdened local hospitals to augment clinic staffs that were exhausted from the battle against coronavirus. Two maternal/fetal medicine physicians were granted emergency clinical providers to assist in these efforts. KEY POINTS: · Maternal-fetal medicine physicians contributed significantly to the COVID-19 pandemic by managing ICU patients.. · Disparate, diverse medical professionals can pull together to form cohesive and functional teams.. · The Department of Defense can mobilize a large group of providers in a short amount of time..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Military Health Services , Military Personnel , Perinatal Care , Physicians , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Change Management , Clinical Competence , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Emotional Adjustment , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , New York City , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Physicians/ethics , Physicians/organization & administration , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Responsibility
14.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 20(4): 442-444, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615060

ABSTRACT

Final-year medical students in the UK have been allowed to voluntarily apply for early provisional registration in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, allowing these foundation interim year-1 (FiY1) doctors to assist in service provision in hospitals where resources and staffing may be strained. The authors, as recently qualified foundation year-1 (FY1) doctors, use this article to draw on their own experiences, and those of their colleagues, to provide advice on key topics that may not have been covered, or not covered sufficiently, in medical education, such as prescribing, rotas, wellbeing, and useful apps and websites.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Medical , Pandemics , Physicians/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Communication , Drug Prescriptions , Health Status , Humans , Internet , Mobile Applications , Physician-Nurse Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching , United Kingdom
15.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 53(3): 175-177, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-530179

ABSTRACT

Public health doctors of Korea contributed significantly to massive coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) testing. They were immediately dispatched to epicenters of the COVID-19 pandemic, and have run tests at screening centers, airport quarantines and hospitals. However, their expertise from in-field experience has been often neglected. It is time to reorganize public health doctor system to better prepare for future epidemics. Transforming and strengthening their roles as public health experts through systematic training is crucial.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Physician's Role , Physicians/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health Practice , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Humans , Inservice Training , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL