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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264921, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify preferred burnout interventions within a resident physician population, utilizing the Nominal Group Technique. The results will be used to design a discrete choice experiment study to inform the development of resident burnout prevention programs. METHODS: Three resident focus groups met (10-14 participants/group) to prioritize a list of 23 factors for burnout prevention programs. The Nominal Group Technique consisted of three steps: an individual, confidential ranking of the 23 factors by importance from 1 to 23, a group discussion of each attribute, including a group review of the rankings, and an opportunity to alter the original ranking across participants. RESULTS: The total number of residents (36) were a representative sample of specialty, year of residency, and sex. There was strong agreement about the most highly rated attributes which grouped naturally into themes of autonomy, meaning, competency and relatedness. There was also disagreement on several of the attributes that is likely due to the differences in residency specialty and subsequently rotation requirements. CONCLUSION: This study identified the need to address multiple organizational factors that may lead to physician burnout. There is a clear need for complex interventions that target systemic and program level factors rather than focus on individual interventions. These results may help residency program directors understand the specific attributes of a burnout prevention program valued by residents. Aligning burnout interventions with resident preferences could improve the efficacy of burnout prevention programs by improving adoption of, and satisfaction with, these programs. Physician burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment [1]. Burnout is present in epidemic proportions and was estimated to occur in over 50 percent of practicing physicians and in up to 89 percent of resident physicians pre-COVID 19. The burnout epidemic is growing; a recent national survey of US physicians reported an 8.9 percent increase in burnout between 2011 and 2014 [2]. Rates of physician burnout have also increased [3] during the COVID-19 pandemic with a new classification of "pandemic burnout" experienced by over 52 percent of healthcare workers as early as June of 2020 [4]. Physician burnout can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, and relationship problems that may progress to substance abuse, increased interpersonal conflicts, broken relationships, low quality of life, major depression, and suicide [5-7]. The estimated rate of physician suicide is 300-400 annually [8-10].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Physicians/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mindfulness , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Social Support
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725600

ABSTRACT

The number of COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease of 2019) cases in Jordan is rising rapidly. A serious threat to the healthcare system appears on the horizon. Our study aims to evaluate preparedness of Jordanian frontline doctors to the worsening scenario. It has a questionnaire-based cross-sectional structure. The questionnaire was designed to evaluate preparedness according to knowledge about virus transmission and protective measures, adherence to protection guidelines, and psychological impacts affecting doctors. Institutional factors affecting doctors' readiness like adopting approach protocols and making protection equipment available were investigated; 308 doctors from different healthcare facilities participated (response rate: 53.9%). Approximately 25% of doctors (n = 77) previously took care of COVID-19 patients, and 173 (56.2%) have institutional COVID-19 approach protocols. Only 57 doctors (18.5%) reported all PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) available. The self-reported score of preparedness to deal with COVID-19 patients was 4.9 ± 2.4. Doctors having institutional protocols for dealing with COVID-19 cases and those with sustained availability of PPE reported higher scores of preparedness (5.5 ± 2.3 and 6.2 ± 2.1 with p < 0.001, respectively). Correlations with knowledge score, adherence to PPE score, and psychological impacts were investigated. The study revealed multiple challenges and insufficiencies that can affect frontline doctors' preparedness. Policy makers are urged to take these findings into consideration and to act promptly.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 11-17, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719332

ABSTRACT

The severe 2019 outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, would be expected to impact the mental health of local medical and nursing staff and thus lead them to seek help. However, those outcomes have yet to be established using epidemiological data. To explore the mental health status of medical and nursing staff and the efficacy, or lack thereof, of critically connecting psychological needs to receiving psychological care, we conducted a quantitative study. This is the first paper on the mental health of medical and nursing staff in Wuhan. Notably, among 994 medical and nursing staff working in Wuhan, 36.9% had subthreshold mental health disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 2.4), 34.4% had mild disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 5.4), 22.4% had moderate disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 9.0), and 6.2% had severe disturbance (mean PHQ-9: 15.1) in the immediate wake of the viral epidemic. The noted burden fell particularly heavily on young women. Of all participants, 36.3% had accessed psychological materials (such as books on mental health), 50.4% had accessed psychological resources available through media (such as online push messages on mental health self-help coping methods), and 17.5% had participated in counseling or psychotherapy. Trends in levels of psychological distress and factors such as exposure to infected people and psychological assistance were identified. Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions. These findings emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Mental Health Services , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 6(1): 36, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The highly contagious nature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) places physicians in South Asia at high risk of contracting the infection. Accordingly, we conducted this study to provide an updated account of physician deaths in South Asia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to analyze and compare the different characteristics associated with physician mortality amongst the countries of the region. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study by using published news reports on the websites of news agencies from 9 selected countries in South Asia. Our study included only those physicians and doctors who died after contracting COVID-19 from their respective workplaces. All available data about the country of origin, type of, sex, age, medical or surgical specialty, and date of death were included. RESULTS: The total number of physician deaths reported due to COVID-19 in our study was 170, with half (87/170, 51%) of the deaths reported from Iran. Male physician deaths were reported to be 145 (145/170 = 85%). Internal Medicine (58.43%) was the most severely affected sub-specialty. The highest physician mortality rate in the general population recorded in Afghanistan (27/1000 deaths). General physicians from India [OR = 11.00(95% CI = 1.06-114.08), p = 0.045] and public sector medical practitioners from Pakistan [aOR = 4.52 (95% CI = 1.18-17.33), p = 0.028] were showing significant mortality when compared with other regions in multivariate logistic regression. CONCLUSION: An increased number of physician deaths, owing to COVID-19, has been shown in South Asia. This could be due to decreased personal protective equipment and the poor health care management systems of the countries in the region to combat the pandemic. Future studies should provide detailed information of characteristics associated with physician mortalities along with the main complications arising due to the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Occupational Diseases/mortality , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Aged , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Bhutan/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Indian Ocean Islands/epidemiology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Pakistan/epidemiology , Sri Lanka/epidemiology
8.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(8): 1080-1085, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405474

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: It has been noted that post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms could be common in physicians who have experienced a traumatic event. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder and contributing risk factors among resident doctors working in a tertiary care hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional study was conducted via an online survey from May to July 2020. Sociodemographic characteristics, exposure to the coronavirus, application of personal hygiene rules, presence and use of personal protective equipment, anxiety and prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder were investigated. RESULTS: In total, 17.8% (n = 40) of 225 resident doctors who participated in the study had post-traumatic stress disorder. Working at a department serving to COVID-19 patients increased the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder by 2.9 times (OR = 2.936, p = 0.003) while contacting positive patients increased this risk by 2.6 times (OR = 2.607, p = 0.023) and lack of personal protective equipment by 3.6 times (OR = 3.656, p = 0.018). Anxiety scores were statistically significantly higher in women, married and those living with their parents or spouses and children (p = 0.049; p = 0.011; p = 0.004, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Working in a department serving to COVID-19 patients, contact with positive patients and lack of personal protective equipment were risk factors in the emergence of post-traumatic stress disorder in resident doctors. Anxiety was also found to be greater in women, married and those living with their families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Internship and Residency , Physicians/psychology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anxiety , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Intern Emerg Med ; 17(3): 829-837, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384590

ABSTRACT

To investigate the effects of the dramatic reduction in presentations to Italian Emergency Departments (EDs) on the main indicators of ED performance during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. From February to June 2020 we retrospectively measured the number of daily presentations normalized for the number of emergency physicians on duty (presentations/physician ratio), door-to-physician and door-to-final disposition (length-of-stay) times of seven EDs in the central area of Tuscany. Using the multivariate regression analysis we investigated the relationship between the aforesaid variables and patient-level (triage codes, age, admissions) or hospital-level factors (number of physician on duty, working surface area, academic vs. community hospital). We analyzed data from 105,271 patients. Over ten consecutive 14-day periods, the number of presentations dropped from 18,239 to 6132 (- 67%) and the proportion of patients visited in less than 60 min rose from 56 to 86%. The proportion of patients with a length-of-stay under 4 h decreased from 59 to 52%. The presentations/physician ratio was inversely related to the proportion of patients with a door-to-physician time under 60 min (slope - 2.91, 95% CI - 4.23 to - 1.59, R2 = 0.39). The proportion of patients with high-priority codes but not the presentations/physician ratio, was inversely related to the proportion of patients with a length-of-stay under 4 h (slope - 0.40, 95% CI - 0.24 to - 0.27, R2 = 0.36). The variability of door-to-physician time and global length-of-stay are predicted by different factors. For appropriate benchmarking among EDs, the use of performance indicators should consider specific, hospital-level and patient-level factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Physicians , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Regression Analysis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
10.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 235-240, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the WHO declared the SARS CoV-2 pandemic. This had an immediate and dramatic impact on Romanian physicians. OBJECTIVES: To analyse SARS-CoV-2 risk perception among Romanian physicians following the official WHO pandemic announcement. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to Romanian physicians (n = 319) between 13 and 27 of March 2020 to determine the perceived threat of exposure to SARS CoV-2 infection, the assessment COVID-19 sources of documentation, physicians' access to personal protective equipment and the attitude towards a prospective vaccine against SARS CoV-2. RESULTS: Confronted with a new and unknown disease, the lack of appropriate information regarding disease management, media pressure and the lack of protective equipment, physicians experiencing a highly stressful a period. We found a significant relationship between the perceived level of fear and the risk of infection with SARS CoV-2 among respondents. A relationship was also found between the perceived level of fear related to COVID-19 and the acceptance of future vaccines against SARS CoV-2. Our data show that doctors working in urban areas considered the medical research on COVID-19 as clearer than those working in rural locations did. CONCLUSION: Pandemic preparedness should focus on measures that make medical practice safe (supplies, working protocols, experience sharing with experts/colleagues from other countries).


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Disease Outbreaks , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians/psychology , Romania , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 41(3): 356-361, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has transformed health care. With the need to limit COVID-19 exposures, telemedicine has become an increasingly important format for clinical care. Compared with other fields, neuro-ophthalmology faces unique challenges, given its dependence on physical examination signs that are difficult to elicit outside the office setting. As such, it is imperative to understand both patient and provider experiences to continue to adapt the technology and tailor its application. The purpose of this study is to analyze both neuro-ophthalmology physician and patient satisfaction with virtual health visits during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Across three institutions (NYU Langone Health, Indiana University Health, and Columbia University Medical Center), telemedicine surveys were administered to 159 patients. Neuro-ophthalmologists completed 157 surveys; each of these were linked to a single patient visit. Patient surveys consisted of 5 questions regarding visit preparation, satisfaction, challenges, and comfort. The physician survey included 4 questions that focused on ability to gather specific clinical information by history and examination. RESULTS: Among 159 patients, 104 (65.4%) reported that they were satisfied with the visit, and 149 (93.7%) indicated that they were comfortable asking questions. Sixty-eight (73.9%) patients found the instructions provided before the visit easy to understand. Potential areas for improvement noted by patients included more detailed preparation instructions and better technology (phone positioning, Internet connection, and software). More than 87% (137/157) of neuro-ophthalmologists surveyed reported having performed an examination that provided enough information for medical decision-making. Some areas of the neuro-ophthalmologic examination were reported to be easy to conduct (range of eye movements, visual acuity, Amsler grids, Ishihara color plates, and pupillary examination). Other components were more difficult (saccades, red desaturation, visual fields, convergence, oscillations, ocular alignment, and smooth pursuit); some were especially challenging (vestibulo-ocular reflex [VOR], VOR suppression, and optokinetic nystagmus). Clinicians noted that virtual health visits were limited by patient preparation, inability to perform certain parts of the examination (funduscopy and pupils), and technological issues. CONCLUSIONS: Among virtual neuro-ophthalmology visits evaluated, most offer patients with appointments that satisfy their needs. Most physicians in this cohort obtained adequate clinical information for decision-making. Even better technology and instructions may help improve aspects of virtual health visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Ophthalmology/methods , Pandemics , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies
12.
J Biomol Tech ; 32(2): 74-82, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365806

ABSTRACT

Across the United States, the number of staff scientists (master's- or doctoral-level professionals working in nonfaculty roles) has grown by 35% since 2010, and they play an increasingly important role in research efforts. However, few targeted resources are available, which potentially limits the effectiveness of this group. Launched in 2016, the staff scientist path at Emory has tripled in size over 4 y to 138 staff. The present case study evaluated the perceptions of staff scientists related to onboarding experiences and professional development needs, including those needs arising from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) impacts in the workplace. A survey of Emory staff scientists was conducted from May to June 2019 as part of a program evaluation initiative to assess perceptions of onboarding and professional development opportunities. Interviews with a subset of scientists informed the survey development and identified COVID-19-related impacts on daily work. Results indicated the need for targeted orientation resources specific to staff scientists, accurate and timely information and resources to support scientists' supervisors, and professional development for scientists in leadership and management-related skills. Remote work associated with COVID-19 accentuated the need for managerial skills, including team development in digital work environments. Findings from this case study can inform policies and practices at Emory and other institutions that employ a similar staff scientist model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Workplace , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Career Mobility , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
13.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 59, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357662

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the rising rate of SARS-CoV-2 infections has caused perceptible strain on the global health system. Indeed, this disease is also a litmus test for the resilience of the structures in the African health system including surgery. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical practice, training and research in Nigeria. METHODS: it was a cross-sectional study conducted over three weeks in Nigeria among doctors in 12 surgery-related specialties. Consenting participants filled a pre-tested online form consisting of 35 questions in 5 sections which assessed demographics, infection control measures, clinical practice, academic training, research program, and future trends. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Version 20. RESULTS: a total of 384 respondents completed the form. Their mean age was 38.3 years. Lockdown measures were imposed in the state of practice of 89.0% of respondents. Most participants reported a decrease in patient volume in outpatient clinics (95.5%) and elective operations (95.8%) compared to reports for emergency operations (50.2%). They also noted a decrease in academic training [Bedside teaching (92.1%), seminar presentation (91.1%) and journal presentation (91.8%)] and research (80.5%). Except in bedside teaching, those who had other virtual academic programmes were thrice the number of those who used in-person mode for the events. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic has caused a significant change in pattern and a decrease in the volume of patients seen by surgeons in their practice as well as a decrease in the frequency of academic programs and research activities in Nigeria.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria , Prospective Studies , Research/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Headache ; 61(7): 1123-1131, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324996

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess telehealth practice for headache visits in the United States. BACKGROUND: The rapid roll out of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic impacted headache specialists. METHODS: American Headache Society (AHS) members were emailed an anonymous survey (9/9/20-10/12/20) to complete if they had logged ≥2 months or 50+ headache visits via telehealth. RESULTS: Out of 1348 members, 225 (16.7%) responded. Most were female (59.8%; 113/189). Median age was 47 (interquartile range [IQR] 37-57) (N = 154). The majority were MD/DOs (83.7%; 159/190) or NP/PAs (14.7%; 28/190), and most (65.1%; 123/189) were in academia. Years in practice were 0-3: 28; 4-10: 58; 11-20: 42; 20+: 61. Median number of telehealth visits was 120 (IQR 77.5-250) in the prior 3 months. Respondents were "comfortable/very comfortable" treating via telehealth (a) new patient with a chief complaint of headache (median, IQR 4 [3-5]); (b) follow-up for migraine (median, IQR 5 [5-5]); (c) follow-up for secondary headache (median, IQR 4 [3-4]). About half (51.1%; 97/190) offer urgent telehealth. Beyond being unable to perform procedures, top barriers were conducting parts of the neurologic exam (157/189), absence of vital signs (117/189), and socioeconomic/technologic barriers (91/189). Top positive attributes were patient convenience (185/190), reducing patient travel stress (172/190), patient cost reduction (151/190), flexibility with personal matters (128/190), patient comfort at home (114/190), and patient medications nearby (103/190). Only 21.3% (33/155) of providers said telehealth visit length differed from in-person visits, and 55.3% (105/190) believe that the no-show rate improved. On a 1-5 Likert scale, providers were "interested"/"very interested" in digitally prescribing headache apps (median 4, IQR 3-5) and "interested"/"very interested" in remotely monitoring patient symptoms (median 4, IQR 3-5). CONCLUSIONS: Respondents were comfortable treating patients with migraine via telehealth. They note positive attributes for patients and how access may be improved. Technology innovations (remote vital signs, digitally prescribing headache apps) and remote symptom monitoring are areas of interest and warrant future research.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Headache Disorders/therapy , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , United States
16.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1524-1528, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298990

ABSTRACT

The role that resistance plays in medicine and medical education is ill-defined. Although physicians and students have been involved in protests related to the COVID-19 pandemic, structural racism, police brutality, and gender inequity, resistance has not been prominent in medical education's discourses, and medical education has not supported students' role and responsibility in developing professional approaches to resistance. While learners should not pick and choose what aspects of medical education they engage with, neither should their moral agency and integrity be compromised. To that end, the authors argue for professional resistance to become a part of medical education. This article sets out a rationale for a more explicit and critical recognition of the role of resistance in medical education by exploring its conceptual basis, its place both in training and practice, and the ways in which medical education might more actively embrace and situate resistance as a core aspect of professional practice. The authors suggest different strategies that medical educators can employ to embrace resistance in medical education and propose a set of principles for resistance in medicine and medical education. Embracing resistance as part of medical education requires a shift in attention away from training physicians solely to replicate and sustain existing systems and practices and toward developing their ability and responsibility to resist situations, structures, and acts that are oppressive, harmful, or unjust.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Medical/methods , Health Personnel/education , Professional Practice/ethics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Concept Formation/ethics , Female , Gender-Based Violence/prevention & control , Gender-Based Violence/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Racism/prevention & control , Racism/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Social Responsibility , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data
18.
J Biomol Tech ; 32(2): 74-82, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268398

ABSTRACT

Across the United States, the number of staff scientists (master's- or doctoral-level professionals working in nonfaculty roles) has grown by 35% since 2010, and they play an increasingly important role in research efforts. However, few targeted resources are available, which potentially limits the effectiveness of this group. Launched in 2016, the staff scientist path at Emory has tripled in size over 4 y to 138 staff. The present case study evaluated the perceptions of staff scientists related to onboarding experiences and professional development needs, including those needs arising from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) impacts in the workplace. A survey of Emory staff scientists was conducted from May to June 2019 as part of a program evaluation initiative to assess perceptions of onboarding and professional development opportunities. Interviews with a subset of scientists informed the survey development and identified COVID-19-related impacts on daily work. Results indicated the need for targeted orientation resources specific to staff scientists, accurate and timely information and resources to support scientists' supervisors, and professional development for scientists in leadership and management-related skills. Remote work associated with COVID-19 accentuated the need for managerial skills, including team development in digital work environments. Findings from this case study can inform policies and practices at Emory and other institutions that employ a similar staff scientist model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Workplace , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Career Mobility , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
19.
Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig ; 72(2): 185-191, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267052

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The second wave of Novel Coronavirus disease (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2) is proving more disastrous than the first because of the new mutant stains. Under these circumstances, vaccination is the only effective solution that can save millions of lives across the globe. OBJECTIVES: The present study was conducted to assess the attitude and acceptance/willingness of health care professionals (medical and dental) towards COVID-19 vaccine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An online questionnaire survey was conducted among medical and dental professionals working in different hospitals of two states of India. A total of 520 subjects constituted the final sample size. A self-constructed questionnaire (divided into 2 parts) containing 12 questions was administered to obtain information from the subjects regarding their attitude and willingness towards COVID 19 vaccine. Statistical analysis was done using chi-square test and multiple liner regression analysis. Odds ratio with 95% CI were also generated. Statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. RESULTS: Majority of the subjects (67% of dental and 73% of medical) had full confidence on the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine. Willingness to get vaccinated was shown by 63% of subjects and 65% had positive attitude towards vaccine. Some subjects (45.5% dental and 48.4% medical) showed concern regarding unforeseen effects of the vaccine. Willingness to get vaccinated was 3.45 higher in subjects who were involved in COVID duties. Subjects giving less preference to natural immunity over vaccine showed more willingness (OR: 2.98) towards getting the vaccine. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study showed that acceptance and attitude of subjects regarding COVID 19 vaccine was suboptimal as there were various factors which contributed towards subjects' hesitancy to get vaccinated. There is an utmost need to address various issues regarding vaccine safety to promote high uptake.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dentists/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dentists/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians/statistics & numerical data
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