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1.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580557

ABSTRACT

The excessive synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6) is related to cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients. Moreover, blocking IL-6 has been suggested as a treatment strategy for inflammatory diseases such as sepsis. Sepsis is a severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-septic effects and the underlying mechanisms of Dracocephalum moldavica ethanol extract (DMEE) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory stimulation in RAW 264.7 macrophages along with septic mouse models. We found that DMEE suppressed the release of inflammatory mediators NO and PGE2 and inhibited both the mRNA and protein expression levels of iNOS and COX-2, respectively. In addition, DMEE reduced the release of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-6 and IL-1ß, in RAW 264.7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK and p65. Furthermore, treatment with DMEE increased the survival rate and decreased the level of IL-6 in plasma in LPS-induced septic shock mice. Our findings suggest that DMEE elicits an anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and an anti-septic effect on septic mouse model through the inhibition of the ERK/JNK/NF-κB signaling cascades and production of IL-6.


Subject(s)
Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lamiaceae/chemistry , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism , Animals , Ethanol/chemistry , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/metabolism , MAP Kinase Kinase 4/metabolism , Male , Mice , Plant Extracts/chemistry , RAW 264.7 Cells
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(24)2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572494

ABSTRACT

Low density polyethylene (LDPE) films covered with active coatings containing mixtures of rosemary, raspberry, and pomegranate CO2 extracts were found to be active against selected bacterial strains that may extend the shelf life of food products. The coatings also offer antiviral activity, due to their influence on the activity of Φ6 bacteriophage, selected as a surrogate for SARS-CoV-2 particles. The mixture of these extracts could be incorporated into a polymer matrix to obtain a foil with antibacterial and antiviral properties. The initial goal of this work was to obtain active LDPE films containing a mixture of CO2 extracts of the aforementioned plants, incorporated into an LDPE matrix via an extrusion process. The second aim of this study was to demonstrate the antibacterial properties of the active films against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and to determine the antiviral effect of the modified material on Φ6 bacteriophage. In addition, an analysis was made on the influence of the active mixture on the polymer physicochemical features, e.g., mechanical and thermal properties, as well as its color and transparency. The results of this research indicated that the LDPE film containing a mixture of raspberry, rosemary, and pomegranate CO2 extracts incorporated into an LDPE matrix inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. This film was also found to be active against Bacillus subtilis. This modified film did not inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas syringae cells; however, their number decreased significantly. The LDPE active film was also found to be active against Φ6 particles, meaning that the film had antiviral properties. The incorporation of the mixture of CO2 extracts into the polymer matrix affected its mechanical properties. It was observed that parameters describing mechanical properties decreased, although did not affect the transition of LDPE significantly. Additionally, the modified film exhibited barrier properties towards UV radiation. Modified PE/CO2 extracts films could be applied as a functional food packaging material with antibacterial and antiviral properties.


Subject(s)
Food Packaging/methods , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Polyethylene/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Bacteriophage phi 6/drug effects , Biofilms , Chitosan/chemistry , Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects , Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects , Humans , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Polyethylene/pharmacology , Polymers/chemistry , Pomegranate , Rosmarinus/chemistry , Rubus , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
3.
Mar Drugs ; 19(12)2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542656

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a major human health concern. The pathogen responsible for COVID-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), invades its host through the interaction of its spike (S) protein with a host cell receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In addition to ACE2, heparan sulfate (HS) on the surface of host cells also plays a significant role as a co-receptor. Our previous studies demonstrated that sulfated glycans, such as heparin and fucoidans, show anti-COVID-19 activities. In the current study, rhamnan sulfate (RS), a polysaccharide with a rhamnose backbone from a green seaweed, Monostroma nitidum, was evaluated for binding to the S-protein from SARS-CoV-2 and inhibition of viral infectivity in vitro. The structural characteristics of RS were investigated by determining its monosaccharide composition and performing two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance. RS inhibition of the interaction of heparin, a highly sulfated HS, with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (from wild type and different mutant variants) was studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In competitive binding studies, the IC50 of RS against the S-protein receptor binding domain (RBD) binding to immobilized heparin was 1.6 ng/mL, which is much lower than the IC50 for heparin (~750 ng/mL). RS showed stronger inhibition than heparin on the S-protein RBD or pseudoviral particles binding to immobilized heparin. Finally, in an in vitro cell-based assay, RS showed strong antiviral activities against wild type SARS-CoV-2 and the delta variant.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Deoxy Sugars/pharmacology , Mannans/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Seaweed , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aquatic Organisms , Deoxy Sugars/therapeutic use , Humans , Mannans/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Protein Binding/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/drug effects , Structure-Activity Relationship
4.
Molecules ; 26(21)2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512511

ABSTRACT

This work describes an untargeted analytical approach for the screening, identification, and characterization of the trans-epithelial transport of green tea (Camellia sinensis) catechin extracts with in vitro inhibitory effect against the SARS-CoV-2 papain-like protease (PLpro) activity. After specific catechin extraction, a chromatographic separation obtained six fractions were carried out. The fractions were assessed in vitro against the PLpro target. Fraction 5 showed the highest inhibitory activity against the SARS-CoV-2 PLpro (IC50 of 0.125 µg mL-1). The untargeted characterization revealed that (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) was the most abundant compound in the fraction and the primary molecule absorbed by differentiated Caco-2 cells. Results indicated that fraction 5 was approximately 10 times more active than ECG (IC50 value equal to 11.62 ± 0.47 µg mL-1) to inhibit the PLpro target. Overall, our findings highlight the synergistic effects of the various components of the crude extract compared to isolated ECG.


Subject(s)
Catechin/pharmacology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Tea/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Caco-2 Cells , Camellia sinensis/metabolism , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Catechin/chemistry , Catechin/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/drug effects , Epithelium/drug effects , Epithelium/metabolism , Humans , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tea/chemistry , Tea/physiology
5.
J Evid Based Integr Med ; 26: 2515690X211036875, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495800

ABSTRACT

Worldwide, the turmoil of the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has generated a burst of research efforts in search of effective prevention and treatment modalities. Current recommendations on natural supplements arise from mostly anecdotal evidence in other viral infections and expert opinion, and many clinical trials are ongoing. Here the authors review the evidence and rationale for the use of natural supplements for prevention and treatment of COVID-19, including those with potential benefit and those with potential harms. Specifically, the authors review probiotics, dietary patterns, micronutrients, antioxidants, polyphenols, melatonin, and cannabinoids. Authors critically evaluated and summarized the biomedical literature published in peer-reviewed journals, preprint servers, and current guidelines recommended by expert scientific governing bodies. Ongoing and future trials registered on clinicaltrials.gov were also recorded, appraised, and considered in conjunction with the literature findings. In light of the controversial issues surrounding the manufacturing and marketing of natural supplements and limited scientific evidence available, the authors assessed the available data and present this review to equip clinicians with the necessary information regarding the evidence for and potential harms of usage to promote open discussions with patients who are considering dietary supplements to prevent and treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dietary Supplements , Micronutrients/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Cannabinoids/pharmacology , Cannabinoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Melatonin/pharmacology , Melatonin/therapeutic use , Micronutrients/pharmacology , Niacinamide/pharmacology , Niacinamide/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Polyphenols/therapeutic use , Probiotics/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Molecules ; 26(21)2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488677

ABSTRACT

Flavonoids are important secondary plant metabolites that have been studied for a long time for their therapeutic potential in inflammatory diseases because of their cytokine-modulatory effects. Five flavonoid aglycones were isolated and identified from the hydrolyzed aqueous methanol extracts of Anastatica hierochuntica L., Citrus reticulata Blanco, and Kickxia aegyptiaca (L.) Nabelek. They were identified as taxifolin (1), pectolinarigenin (2), tangeretin (3), gardenin B (4), and hispidulin (5). These structures were elucidated based on chromatographic and spectral analysis. In this study, molecular docking studies were carried out for the isolated and identified compounds against SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) compared to the co-crystallized inhibitor of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro (α-ketoamide inhibitor (KI), IC50 = 66.72 µg/mL) as a reference standard. Moreover, in vitro screening against SARS-CoV-2 was evaluated. Compounds 2 and 3 showed the highest virus inhibition with IC50 12.4 and 2.5 µg/mL, respectively. Our findings recommend further advanced in vitro and in vivo studies of the examined isolated flavonoids, especially pectolinarigenin (2), tangeretin (3), and gardenin B (4), either alone or in combination with each other to identify a promising lead to target SARS-CoV-2 effectively. This is the first report of the activity of these compounds against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/drug effects , Flavones/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Brassicaceae/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chromones/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Drug Discovery/methods , Flavones/metabolism , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Quercetin/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells
7.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 284: 114797, 2022 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487836

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: For millennia, Artemisia annua L. was used in Southeast Asia to treat "fever". This medicinal plant is effective against multiple pathogens and is used by many global communities as a source of artemisinin derivatives that are first-line drugs to treat malaria caused by Plasmodium parasites. AIM OF THE STUDY: The SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) global pandemic has killed millions and evolved numerous variants, with delta being the most transmissible to date and causing break-through infections of vaccinated individuals. We further queried the efficacy of A. annua cultivars against new variants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using Vero E6 cells, we measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity of dried-leaf hot-water A. annua L. extracts of four cultivars, A3, BUR, MED, and SAM, to determine their efficacy against five infectious variants of the virus: alpha (B.1.1.7), beta (B.1.351), gamma (P.1), delta (B.1.617.2), and kappa (B.1.617.1). RESULTS: In addition to being effective against the original wild type (WT) WA1, A. annua cultivars A3, BUR, MED, and SAM were also potent against all five variants. IC50 and IC90 values based on measured artemisinin content ranged from 0.3 to 8.4 µM and 1.4-25.0 µM, respectively. The IC50 and IC90 values based on dried leaf weight (DW) used to make the tea infusions ranged from 11.0 to 67.7 µg DW and 59.5-160.6 µg DW, respectively. Cell toxicity was insignificant at a leaf dry weight of ≤50 µg in the extract of any cultivar. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that oral consumption of A. annua hot-water extracts (tea infusions) could potentially provide a cost-effective therapy to help stave off the rapid global spread of these variants, buying time for broader implementation of vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Artemisia annua/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Inhibitory Concentration 50 , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Vero Cells
8.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480885

ABSTRACT

In our in vitro and in vivo studies, we used Acalypha indica root methanolic extract (AIRME), and investigated their free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Primarily, phytochemical analysis showed rich content of phenols (70.92 mg of gallic acid/g) and flavonoids (16.01 mg of rutin/g) in AIRME. We then performed HR-LC-MS and GC-MS analyses, and identified 101 and 14 phytochemical compounds, respectively. Among them, ramipril glucuronide (1.563%), antimycin A (1.324%), swietenine (1.134%), quinone (1.152%), oxprenolol (1.118%), choline (0.847%), bumetanide (0.847%) and fenofibrate (0.711%) are the predominant phytomolecules. Evidence from in vitro studies revealed that AIRME scavenges DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in a concentration dependent manner (10-50 µg/mL). Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation were also remarkably inhibited by AIRME as concentration increases (20-100 µg/mL). In vitro antioxidant activity of AIRME was comparable to ascorbic acid treatment. For in vivo studies, carrageenan (1%, sub-plantar) was injected to rats to induce localized inflammation. Acute inflammation was represented by paw-edema, and significantly elevated (p < 0.05) WBC, platelets and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, AIRME pretreatment (150/300 mg/kg bodyweight) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased edema volume. This was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) reduction of WBC, platelets and CRP with both doses of AIRME. The decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in paw tissue were restored (p < 0.05 / p < 0.01) with AIRME in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, AIRME attenuated carrageenan-induced neutrophil infiltrations and vascular dilation in paw tissue. For the first time, our findings demonstrated the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of AIRME, which could be considered to develop novel anti-inflammatory drugs.


Subject(s)
Acalypha/chemistry , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Disease Models, Animal , Edema/drug therapy , Edema/enzymology , Edema/pathology , Free Radical Scavengers/chemistry , Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Male , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Roots/chemistry , Rats , Rats, Wistar
9.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480883

ABSTRACT

Viral infections are among the most complex medical problems and have been a major threat to the economy and global health. Several epidemics and pandemics have occurred due to viruses, which has led to a significant increase in mortality and morbidity rates. Natural products have always been an inspiration and source for new drug development because of their various uses. Among all-natural sources, plant sources are the most dominant for the discovery of new therapeutic agents due to their chemical and structural diversity. Despite the traditional use and potential source for drug development, natural products have gained little attention from large pharmaceutical industries. Several plant extracts and isolated compounds have been extensively studied and explored for antiviral properties against different strains of viruses. In this review, we have compiled antiviral plant extracts and natural products isolated from plants reported since 2015.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biological Products/pharmacology , Drug Development , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-HIV Agents/chemistry , Anti-HIV Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-HIV Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/isolation & purification , Drug Discovery , Flavivirus/drug effects , Hepatitis Viruses/drug effects , Humans , Molecular Structure , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Simplexvirus/drug effects
10.
Phytother Res ; 35(10): 5365-5373, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479284

ABSTRACT

Andrographis paniculata is home to a rich variety of molecules especially andrographolide and its derivatives. Clinical properties of the andrographolide are multifarious and include: analgesic, antipyretic, antiretroviral, antiproliferative, antimalarial, antithrombotic, antihyperglycemic, antiurolethial, antilesihmaniasis, hepatoprotective, immune-modulatory, protective against alcohol induced toxicity and cardioproetcive activity and anticancer activity. Andrographolide, neoandrographolide, dehydroandrographolide and several natural and synthetic derivatives of it: 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide and 14-deoxyandrographolide, dehydroandrographolide succinic acid monoester (DAMS), 14-ά-lipoyl andrographolide (AL-1), 14-acetyl-3,9-isopropyl-ideneandrographolide, 14-acetylandrographolide, 3,14,19-triacetylandrographolide, and 3,9-isopropyl-idene andrographolide, are shown to possess significant antiviral activity against HIV, influenza A, HBV, HCV, HPP and HSV. Studies on SARS CoV 2 is restricted to in silico molecular docking studies on viral targets and selected host target proteins. The main targets of andrographolide and its derivatives are fusion and adsorption of virus to the host cell, binding to viral receptor and co-receptor, enzymes involved in DNA/RNA/Genome replication by the virus, translation, post-translation and reverse transcription. Andrographolide as a drug is yet to reach its full therapeutic potential since this molecule shows low bioavailability. Andrographolide therapy is in need of an appropriate delivery system that may increase its bioavailability. Further high-quality studies are needed to firmly establish the clinical efficacy of the plant.


Subject(s)
Andrographis , Antiviral Agents , Diterpenes , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Andrographis/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Diterpenes/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
11.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 187: 976-987, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474606

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus 3C-like protease (3CLpro) is a crucial target for treating coronavirus diseases including COVID-19. Our preliminary screening showed that Ampelopsis grossedentata extract (AGE) displayed potent SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory activity, but the key constituents with SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory effect and their mechanisms were unrevealed. Herein, a practical strategy via integrating bioactivity-guided fractionation and purification, mass spectrometry-based peptide profiling and time-dependent biochemical assay, was applied to identify the crucial constituents in AGE and to uncover their inhibitory mechanisms. The results demonstrated that the flavonoid-rich fractions (10-17.5 min) displayed strong SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory activities, while the constituents in these fractions were isolated and their SARS-CoV-2-3CLpro inhibitory activities were investigated. Among all isolated flavonoids, dihydromyricetin, isodihydromyricetin and myricetin strongly inhibited SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro in a time-dependent manner. Further investigations demonstrated that myricetin could covalently bind on SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro at Cys300 and Cys44, while dihydromyricetin and isodihydromyricetin covalently bound at Cys300. Covalent docking coupling with molecular dynamics simulations showed the detailed interactions between the orthoquinone form of myricetin and two covalent binding sites (surrounding Cys300 and Cys44) of SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro. Collectively, the flavonoids in AGE strongly and time-dependently inhibit SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro, while the newly identified SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro inhibitors in AGE offer promising lead compounds for developing novel antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
3C Viral Proteases/chemistry , 3C Viral Proteases/metabolism , Ampelopsis/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Flavonoids/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites/drug effects , Cysteine/metabolism , Flavonoids/chemistry , Flavonols/chemistry , Flavonols/pharmacology , Mass Spectrometry , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Conformation/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
12.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470935

ABSTRACT

Excessive host inflammation following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with severity and mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We recently reported that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 subunit (S1) induces pro-inflammatory responses by activating toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in macrophages. A standardized extract of Asparagus officinalis stem (EAS) is a unique functional food that elicits anti-photoaging effects by suppressing pro-inflammatory signaling in hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B-exposed skin fibroblasts. To elucidate its potential in preventing excessive inflammation in COVID-19, we examined the effects of EAS on pro-inflammatory responses in S1-stimulated macrophages. Murine peritoneal exudate macrophages were co-treated with EAS and S1. Concentrations and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Expression and phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins were analyzed using western blotting and fluorescence immunomicroscopy. EAS significantly attenuated S1-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 in a concentration-dependent manner without reducing cell viability. EAS also markedly suppressed the S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß. However, among the TLR4 signaling proteins, EAS did not affect the degradation of inhibitor κBα, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase p54 subunit after S1 exposure. In contrast, EAS significantly suppressed S1-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Attenuation of S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126 was greater than that by the Akt inhibitor perifosine, and the effects were potentiated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors. These results suggest that EAS attenuates S1-induced IL-6 and IL-1ß production by suppressing p44/42 MAPK and Akt signaling in macrophages. Therefore, EAS may be beneficial in regulating excessive inflammation in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asparagus Plant/chemistry , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Asparagus Plant/metabolism , Butadienes/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , Nitriles/pharmacology , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Stems/chemistry , Plant Stems/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
13.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112291, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxytocin (OXT), a neuropeptide involved in mammal reproductive and prosocial behaviors, has been reported to interact with various stressor-provoked neurobiological changes, including neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter, and inflammatory processes. In view of disturbances in psychosocial relationships due to social isolation and physical distancing measures amid the COVID-19 pandemic, being one of the triggering factors for the recent rise in depression and anxiety, OXT is a potential candidate for a new antidepressant. METHODS: In this present study, we have aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (RE), extracted from distillation residue of rosemary essential oil, on central OXT level in the context of other stress biomarkers and neurotransmitter levels in mice models. Tail suspension test (TST) and elevated plus maze test (EPMT) following LPS injection were employed to assess depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in mice, respectively. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with RE for seven days significantly improved behavior in TST and EPMT. Whole-genome microarray analysis reveals that RE significantly reversed TST stress-induced alterations in gene expressions related to oxytocinergic and neurotransmitter pathways and inflammatory processes. In both models, RE significantly increased central Oxt and Oxtr expressions, as well as OXT protein levels. RE also significantly attenuated stress-induced changes in serum corticosterone, brain and serum BDNF levels, and brain neurotransmitters levels in both models. INTERPRETATION: Altogether, our study is the first to report antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activities of RE through modulating oxytocinergic system in mice brain and thus highlights the prospects of RE in the treatment of depressive disorders of psychosocial nature.


Subject(s)
Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Oxytocin/metabolism , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Receptors, Oxytocin/metabolism , Rosmarinus , Animals , Anti-Anxiety Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-Anxiety Agents/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/isolation & purification , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/metabolism , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Oxytocin/agonists , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Receptors, Oxytocin/agonists
14.
Molecules ; 25(8)2020 Apr 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450861

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Viral respiratory infections cause life-threatening diseases in millions of people worldwide every year. Human coronavirus and several picornaviruses are responsible for worldwide epidemic outbreaks, thus representing a heavy burden to their hosts. In the absence of specific treatments for human viral infections, natural products offer an alternative in terms of innovative drug therapies. (2) Methods: We analyzed the antiviral properties of the leaves and stem bark of the mulberry tree (Morus spp.). We compared the antiviral activity of Morus spp. on enveloped and nonenveloped viral pathogens, such as human coronavirus (HCoV 229E) and different members of the Picornaviridae family-human poliovirus 1, human parechovirus 1 and 3, and human echovirus 11. The antiviral activity of 12 water and water-alcohol plant extracts of the leaves and stem bark of three different species of mulberry-Morus alba var. alba, Morus alba var. rosa, and Morus rubra-were evaluated. We also evaluated the antiviral activities of kuwanon G against HCoV-229E. (3) Results: Our results showed that several extracts reduced the viral titer and cytopathogenic effects (CPE). Leaves' water-alcohol extracts exhibited maximum antiviral activity on human coronavirus, while stem bark and leaves' water and water-alcohol extracts were the most effective on picornaviruses. (4) Conclusions: The analysis of the antiviral activities of Morus spp. offer promising applications in antiviral strategies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus/drug effects , Morus/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral/drug effects , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Picornaviridae/drug effects , Plant Bark/chemistry , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plant Leaves/chemistry
15.
J Ovarian Res ; 14(1): 126, 2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440942

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infections by the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19 are presently a global emergency. The current vaccination effort may reduce the infection rate, but strain variants are emerging under selection pressure. Thus, there is an urgent need to find drugs that treat COVID-19 and save human lives. Hence, in this study, we identified phytoconstituents of an edible vegetable, Bitter melon (Momordica charantia), that affect the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. METHODS: Components of Momordica charantia were tested to identify the compounds that bind to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. An MTiOpenScreen web-server was used to perform docking studies. The Lipinski rule was utilized to evaluate potential interactions between the drug and other target molecules. PyMol and Schrodinger software were used to identify the hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was employed to assess the interaction between an extract component (erythrodiol) and the spike protein. RESULTS: Our in-silico evaluations showed that phytoconstituents of Momordica charantia have a low binding energy range, -5.82 to -5.97 kcal/mol. A docking study revealed two sets of phytoconstituents that bind at the S1 and S2 domains of SARS-CoV-2. SPR showed that erythrodiol has a strong binding affinity (KD = 1.15 µM) with the S2 spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. Overall, docking, ADME properties, and SPR displayed strong interactions between phytoconstituents and the active site of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that phytoconstituents from bitter melon are potential agents to treat SARS-CoV-2 viral infections due to their binding to spike proteins S1 and S2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Momordica charantia/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Binding Sites/drug effects , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions/drug effects , Molecular Docking Simulation , Oleanolic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Oleanolic Acid/chemistry , Oleanolic Acid/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Surface Plasmon Resonance
16.
ScientificWorldJournal ; 2021: 9632034, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438139

ABSTRACT

The world is currently grappling with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The infection can cause fever, a dry cough, fatigue, severe pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome, and in some cases death. There is currently no effective antiviral SARS-CoV-2 drug. To reduce the number of infections and deaths, it is critical to focus on strengthening immunity. This review aims to conduct a comprehensive search on the previous studies using Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus for the collection of research papers based on the role of zinc in the immune system, the antiviral activity of zinc, the effect of zinc supplementation in respiratory infections, the therapeutic approaches against viral infections based on medicinal plants, and the role of plants' bioactive molecules in fighting viral infections. In conclusion, we highlighted the pivotal role of zinc in antiviral immunity and we suggested the bioactive molecules derived from medicinal plants as a search matrix for the development of anti-SARS-CoV-2 drugs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Zinc/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immune System/drug effects
17.
Molecules ; 26(19)2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438676

ABSTRACT

In response to the urgent need to control Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), this study aims to explore potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 agents from natural sources. Moreover, cytokine immunological responses to the viral infection could lead to acute respiratory distress which is considered a critical and life-threatening complication associated with the infection. Therefore, the anti-viral and anti-inflammatory agents can be key to the management of patients with COVID-19. Four bioactive compounds, namely ferulic acid 1, rutin 2, gallic acid 3, and chlorogenic acid 4 were isolated from the leaves of Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr (ethyl acetate extract) and identified using spectroscopic evidence. Furthermore, molecular docking and dynamics simulations were performed for the isolated and identified compounds (1-4) against SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) as a proposed mechanism of action. Furthermore, all compounds were tested for their half-maximal cytotoxicity (CC50) and SARS-CoV-2 inhibitory concentrations (IC50). Additionally, lung toxicity was induced in rats by mercuric chloride and the effects of treatment with P. dioca aqueous extract, ferulic acid 1, rutin 2, gallic acid 3, and chlorogenic acid 4 were recorded through measuring TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-2, IL-10, G-CSF, and genetic expression of miRNA 21-3P and miRNA-155 levels to assess their anti-inflammatory effects essential for COVID-19 patients. Interestingly, rutin 2, gallic acid 3, and chlorogenic acid 4 showed remarkable anti-SARS-CoV-2 activities with IC50 values of 31 µg/mL, 108 µg/mL, and 360 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effects were found to be better in ferulic acid 1 and rutin 2 treatments. Our results could be promising for more advanced preclinical and clinical studies especially on rutin 2 either alone or in combination with other isolates for COVID-19 management.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chlorogenic Acid/isolation & purification , Chlorogenic Acid/pharmacology , Coumaric Acids/isolation & purification , Coumaric Acids/pharmacology , Gallic Acid/isolation & purification , Gallic Acid/pharmacology , Humans , Male , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Rats , Rutin/isolation & purification , Rutin/pharmacology , Vero Cells
18.
Virol J ; 17(1): 136, 2020 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435256

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronaviruses (CoVs) were long thought to only cause mild respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms in humans but outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)-CoV, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV-1, and the recently identified SARS-CoV-2 have cemented their zoonotic potential and their capacity to cause serious morbidity and mortality, with case fatality rates ranging from 4 to 35%. Currently, no specific prophylaxis or treatment is available for CoV infections. Therefore we investigated the virucidal and antiviral potential of Echinacea purpurea (Echinaforce®) against human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E, highly pathogenic MERS- and SARS-CoVs, as well as the newly identified SARS-CoV-2, in vitro. METHODS: To evaluate the antiviral potential of the extract, we pre-treated virus particles and cells and evaluated remaining infectivity by limited dilution. Furthermore, we exposed cells to the extract after infection to further evaluate its potential as a prophylaxis and treatment against coronaviruses. We also determined the protective effect of Echinaforce® in re-constituted nasal epithelium. RESULTS: In the current study, we found that HCoV-229E was irreversibly inactivated when exposed to Echinaforce® at 3.2 µg/ml IC50. Pre-treatment of cell lines, however, did not inhibit infection with HCoV-229E and post-infection treatment had only a marginal effect on virus propagation at 50 µg/ml. However, we did observe a protective effect in an organotypic respiratory cell culture system by exposing pre-treated respiratory epithelium to droplets of HCoV-229E, imitating a natural infection. The observed virucidal activity of Echinaforce® was not restricted to common cold coronaviruses, as both SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoVs were inactivated at comparable concentrations. Finally, the causative agent of COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2 was also inactivated upon treatment with 50µg/ml Echinaforce®. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that Echinaforce® is virucidal against HCoV-229E, upon direct contact and in an organotypic cell culture model. Furthermore, MERS-CoV and both SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 were inactivated at similar concentrations of the extract. Therefore we hypothesize that Echinacea purpurea preparations, such as Echinaforce®, could be effective as prophylactic treatment for all CoVs due to their structural similarities.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus 229E, Human/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19 , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Common Cold/drug therapy , Common Cold/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Vero Cells
19.
Curr Pharm Des ; 27(31): 3389-3398, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid eruption of Coronavirus at the end of 2019 has caused global health crisis and significant loss to the economy and social well-being. This created a massive shortage of advanced health facilities with inadequate medicinal supply, further deteriorating human health conditions. On the basis of adverse effects of the ongoing pandemic, this review has been proposed to evaluate the antiviral efficacy of plant- based therapeutics, against SARS-CoV-2 (commonly called COVID-19) infection. It highlights the possible action of the mechanism of phytotherapeutic drugs against coronavirus inhibition, further validated by clinical trials on herbal formulas is reviewed. Though the experimental studies on COVID-19 treatment are limited, the undesirable side effects of herbal drugs and unidentified compounds cannot be ignored. OBJECTIVE: We have made an effort to study the prospective plant-derived bioactive entities and their effectiveness in the treatment of COVID-19 and also emphasize on safety and regulatory concerns of phytomedicines. METHODS: The methodology involves relevant studies on COVID-19 treatment based on herbal extracts and the purified bioactive metabolites. The e-literature survey has been done by downloading research articles available on PubMed (National Library of medicine), Elsevier, and Google scholar search engines. The keywords used are plant metabolites, natural bioactive, phytotherapeutic drugs, clinical trials, SARS-CoV-2, Coronavirus inhibitors and herbal extracts. RESULTS: The review pays particular attention to the etiological study of the COVID-19 virus and its inhibition using medicinal plant metabolites as immunomodulatory agents. The application of valuable bioactives like phenolic compounds, saponins, alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids and terpenoids in preparing herbal formula/drug has been focused on. The drug resistance of bioactive compounds and their side effects on human health were discussed for effective phytomedicine, thus, emphasizing the perspectives of phytotherapeutic drugs as a safe remedy to boost immunomodulatory functions and antiviral activity against COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Altogether, the review presents the action mechanism of plant extracts rich in bioactive compounds and depicted potential antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2. These plant bioactive compounds can serve as lead molecules to develop phytomedicine, ensuring all safety regulations in the clinical trials to treat or prevent COVID-19 viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Plants, Medicinal , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Virol J ; 18(1): 182, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403244

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditional medicines based on herbal extracts have been proposed as affordable treatments for patients suffering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Teas and drinks containing extracts of Artemisia annua and Artemisia afra have been widely used in Africa in efforts to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection and fight COVID-19. METHODS: The plant extracts and Covid-Organics drink produced in Madagascar were tested for plaque reduction using both feline coronavirus and SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Their cytotoxicities were also investigated. RESULTS: Several extracts as well as Covid-Organics inhibited SARS-CoV-2 and FCoV infection at concentrations that did not affect cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: Some plant extracts show inhibitory activity against FCoV and SARS-CoV-2. However, it remains unclear whether peak plasma concentrations in humans can reach levels needed to inhibit viral infection following consumption of teas or Covid-Organics. Clinical studies are required to evaluate the utility of these drinks for COVID-19 prevention or treatment of patients.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Artemisia/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Coronavirus, Feline/drug effects , Coronavirus, Feline/growth & development , Plant Extracts/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Viral Plaque Assay
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