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1.
PLoS Pathog ; 18(2): e1010282, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753213

ABSTRACT

Immunization with radiation-attenuated sporozoites (RAS) can confer sterilizing protection against malaria, although the mechanisms behind this protection are incompletely understood. We performed a systems biology analysis of samples from the Immunization by Mosquito with Radiation Attenuated Sporozoites (IMRAS) trial, which comprised P. falciparum RAS-immunized (PfRAS), malaria-naive participants whose protection from malaria infection was subsequently assessed by controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). Blood samples collected after initial PfRAS immunization were analyzed to compare immune responses between protected and non-protected volunteers leveraging integrative analysis of whole blood RNA-seq, high parameter flow cytometry, and single cell CITEseq of PBMCs. This analysis revealed differences in early innate immune responses indicating divergent paths associated with protection. In particular, elevated levels of inflammatory responses early after the initial immunization were detrimental for the development of protective adaptive immunity. Specifically, non-classical monocytes and early type I interferon responses induced within 1 day of PfRAS vaccination correlated with impaired immunity. Non-protected individuals also showed an increase in Th2 polarized T cell responses whereas we observed a trend towards increased Th1 and T-bet+ CD8 T cell responses in protected individuals. Temporal differences in genes associated with natural killer cells suggest an important role in immune regulation by these cells. These findings give insight into the immune responses that confer protection against malaria and may guide further malaria vaccine development. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01994525.


Subject(s)
Immunity , Inflammation , Malaria Vaccines/immunology , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , Sporozoites/immunology , Adult , Animals , Anopheles/parasitology , Female , Humans , Immunization/methods , Insect Bites and Stings/immunology , Malaria, Falciparum/parasitology , Male , Mosquito Vectors/parasitology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 565625, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574690

ABSTRACT

Sub-Saharan Africa has generally experienced few cases and deaths of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In addition to other potential explanations for the few cases and deaths of COVID-19 such as the population socio-demographics, early lockdown measures and the possibility of under reporting, we hypothesize in this mini review that individuals with a recent history of malaria infection may be protected against infection or severe form of COVID-19. Given that both the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) merozoites bind to the cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) immunoglobulin, we hypothesize that the immunological memory against P. falciparum merozoites primes SARS-CoV-2 infected cells for early phagocytosis, hence protecting individuals with a recent P. falciparum infection against COVID-19 infection or severity. This mini review therefore discusses the potential biological link between P. falciparum infection and COVID-19 infection or severity and further highlights the importance of CD147 immunoglobulin as an entry point for both SARS-CoV-2 and P. falciparum into host cells.


Subject(s)
Basigin/immunology , COVID-19 , Immunologic Memory , Malaria, Falciparum , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Merozoites/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17626, 2021 09 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392887

ABSTRACT

Antigen identification is an important step in the vaccine development process. Computational approaches including deep learning systems can play an important role in the identification of vaccine targets using genomic and proteomic information. Here, we present a new computational system to discover and analyse novel vaccine targets leading to the design of a multi-epitope subunit vaccine candidate. The system incorporates reverse vaccinology and immuno-informatics tools to screen genomic and proteomic datasets of several pathogens such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium falciparum, and Vibrio cholerae to identify potential vaccine candidates (PVC). Further, as a case study, we performed a detailed analysis of the genomic and proteomic dataset of T. cruzi (CL Brenner and Y strain) to shortlist eight proteins as possible vaccine antigen candidates using properties such as secretory/surface-exposed nature, low transmembrane helix (< 2), essentiality, virulence, antigenic, and non-homology with host/gut flora proteins. Subsequently, highly antigenic and immunogenic MHC class I, MHC class II and B cell epitopes were extracted from top-ranking vaccine targets. The designed vaccine construct containing 24 epitopes, 3 adjuvants, and 4 linkers was analysed for its physicochemical properties using different tools, including docking analysis. Immunological simulation studies suggested significant levels of T-helper, T-cytotoxic cells, and IgG1 will be elicited upon administration of such a putative multi-epitope vaccine construct. The vaccine construct is predicted to be soluble, stable, non-allergenic, non-toxic, and to offer cross-protection against related Trypanosoma species and strains. Further, studies are required to validate safety and immunogenicity of the vaccine.


Subject(s)
Computational Biology/methods , Vaccines/immunology , Vaccinology/methods , Bacterial Vaccines/immunology , Chagas Disease/immunology , Chagas Disease/prevention & control , Cholera/immunology , Cholera/prevention & control , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Malaria, Falciparum/prevention & control , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , Protozoan Vaccines/immunology , Trypanosoma cruzi/immunology , Vibrio cholerae/immunology
4.
N Engl J Med ; 385(9): 803-814, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Additional interventions are needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by malaria. METHODS: We conducted a two-part, phase 1 clinical trial to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of CIS43LS, an antimalarial monoclonal antibody with an extended half-life, and its efficacy against infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Part A of the trial assessed the safety, initial side-effect profile, and pharmacokinetics of CIS43LS in healthy adults who had never had malaria. Participants received CIS43LS subcutaneously or intravenously at one of three escalating dose levels. A subgroup of participants from Part A continued to Part B, and some received a second CIS43LS infusion. Additional participants were enrolled in Part B and received CIS43LS intravenously. To assess the protective efficacy of CIS43LS, some participants underwent controlled human malaria infection in which they were exposed to mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites 4 to 36 weeks after administration of CIS43LS. RESULTS: A total of 25 participants received CIS43LS at a dose of 5 mg per kilogram of body weight, 20 mg per kilogram, or 40 mg per kilogram, and 4 of the 25 participants received a second dose (20 mg per kilogram regardless of initial dose). No safety concerns were identified. We observed dose-dependent increases in CIS43LS serum concentrations, with a half-life of 56 days. None of the 9 participants who received CIS43LS, as compared with 5 of 6 control participants who did not receive CIS43LS, had parasitemia according to polymerase-chain-reaction testing through 21 days after controlled human malaria infection. Two participants who received 40 mg per kilogram of CIS43LS and underwent controlled human malaria infection approximately 36 weeks later had no parasitemia, with serum concentrations of CIS43LS of 46 and 57 µg per milliliter at the time of controlled human malaria infection. CONCLUSIONS: Among adults who had never had malaria infection or vaccination, administration of the long-acting monoclonal antibody CIS43LS prevented malaria after controlled infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; VRC 612 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04206332.).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Malaria, Falciparum/prevention & control , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacokinetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacokinetics , Antibodies, Protozoan/blood , Antimalarials/administration & dosage , Antimalarials/adverse effects , Antimalarials/pharmacokinetics , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous/adverse effects , Injections, Subcutaneous/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , Plasmodium falciparum/isolation & purification
5.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(11): 4549-4552, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341084

ABSTRACT

Malaria vaccines hold significant promise for life-saving benefit, especially to children who bear the major burden of malaria mortality. The RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine provides moderate efficacy and is being tested in implementation studies. In parallel, multiple strategies are being advanced to test next-generation malaria vaccines, including novel approaches that build on principles learned from RTS,S development, vaccination with radiation-attenuated sporozoites, and development of monoclonal antibodies targeting immunogenic peptides. Novel vaccine delivery approaches are also being advanced, including self-amplifying RNA vaccine delivery, self-assembling protein nanoparticle methods, circumsporozoite protein-based approaches, and whole organism vaccination. Techniques employed for COVID-19 vaccine development should also be considered for malaria vaccination, including sustained release polymer nanoparticle hydrogel vaccination and charge-altering releasable transporters. As vaccine science advances and new approaches optimize knowledge gained, highly effective malaria vaccines that provide sustained protection are within reach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malaria Vaccines , Malaria, Falciparum , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/prevention & control , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic
6.
J Leukoc Biol ; 109(1): 77-90, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188012

ABSTRACT

B cells play a central role in antiviral and antiparasitic immunity, not only as producers of antibodies, but also as APCs and mediators of inflammation. In this study, we used 16-color flow cytometry analysis to investigate the frequency, differentiation, and activation status of peripheral B cells of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection or acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria compared with the healthy individuals. As a main result, we observed an increase of the frequency of (CD27-, CD21-) atypical memory B cells and (CD19+, CD27+, CD38+) plasmablasts in malaria and COVID-19 patients. Additionally, CD86, PD-1, CXCR3, and CD39 expression was up-regulated, whereas CD73 was down-regulated on plasmablasts of COVID-19 and malaria patients compared with the bulk B cell population. In particular, there was a more pronounced loss of CD73+ B cells in malaria. The frequency of plasmablasts positively correlated with serum levels of CRP, IL-6, and LDH of COVID-19 patients. In the longitudinal course of COVID-19, a rapid normalization of the frequency of atypical memory B cells was observed. The role and function of plasmablasts and atypical memory B cells in COVID-19 and other acute infections remain to be further investigated. The role of B cells as either "driver or passenger" of hyperinflammation during COVID-19 needs to be clarified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Plasma Cells/immunology , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antigens, CD/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma Cells/pathology
7.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 158: 159-179, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-141701

ABSTRACT

Human malaria is a pathogenic disease mainly caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which was responsible for about 405,000 deaths globally in the year 2018. To date, several vaccine candidates have been evaluated for prevention, which failed to produce optimal output at various preclinical/clinical stages. This study is based on designing of polypeptide vaccines (PVs) against human malaria that cover almost all stages of life-cycle of Plasmodium and for the same 5 genome derived predicted antigenic proteins (GDPAP) have been used. For the development of a multi-immune inducer, 15 PVs were initially designed using T-cell epitope ensemble, which covered >99% human population as well as linear B-cell epitopes with or without adjuvants. The immune simulation of PVs showed higher levels of T-cell and B-cell activities compared to positive and negative vaccine controls. Furthermore, in silico cloning of PVs and codon optimization followed by enhanced expression within Lactococcus lactis host system was also explored. Although, the study has sound theoretical and in silico findings, the in vitro/in vivo evaluation seems imperative to warrant the immunogenicity and safety of PVs towards management of P. falciparum infection in the future.


Subject(s)
Epitopes/chemistry , Malaria Vaccines/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Plasmodium falciparum/immunology , Administration, Oral , Antibody Affinity , Binding Sites, Antibody , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Malaria Vaccines/administration & dosage , Malaria Vaccines/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Subunit/chemistry , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology
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