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2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 776861, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701723

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular dysfunction and disease are common and frequently fatal complications of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Indeed, from early on during the SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic it was recognized that cardiac complications may occur, even in patients with no underlying cardiac disorders, as part of the acute infection, and that these were associated with more severe disease and increased morbidity and mortality. The most common cardiac complication is acute cardiac injury, defined by significant elevation of cardiac troponins. The potential mechanisms of cardiovascular complications include direct viral myocardial injury, systemic inflammation induced by the virus, sepsis, arrhythmia, myocardial oxygen supply-demand mismatch, electrolyte abnormalities, and hypercoagulability. This review is focused on the prevalence, risk factors and clinical course of COVID-19-related myocardial injury, as well as on current data with regard to disease pathogenesis, specifically the interaction of platelets with the vascular endothelium. The latter section includes consideration of the role of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in triggering development of a generalized endotheliitis that, in turn, drives intense activation of platelets. Most prominently, SARS-CoV-2-induced endotheliitis involves interaction of the viral spike protein with endothelial angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) together with alternative mechanisms that involve the nucleocapsid and viroporin. In addition, the mechanisms by which activated platelets intensify endothelial activation and dysfunction, seemingly driven by release of the platelet-derived calcium-binding proteins, SA100A8 and SA100A9, are described. These events create a SARS-CoV-2-driven cycle of intravascular inflammation and coagulation, which contributes significantly to a poor clinical outcome in patients with severe disease.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Platelet Activation/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Myocardium/pathology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674671

ABSTRACT

Inflammation and thrombosis are closely intertwined in numerous disorders, including ischemic events and sepsis, as well as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Thrombotic complications are markers of disease severity in both sepsis and COVID-19 and are associated with multiorgan failure and increased mortality. Immunothrombosis is driven by the complement/tissue factor/neutrophil axis, as well as by activated platelets, which can trigger the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and release further effectors of immunothrombosis, including platelet factor 4 (PF4/CXCL4) and high-mobility box 1 protein (HMGB1). Many of the central effectors of deregulated immunothrombosis, including activated platelets and platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (pEVs) expressing PF4, soluble PF4, HMGB1, histones, as well as histone-decorated NETs, are positively charged and thus bind to heparin. Here, we provide evidence that adsorbents functionalized with endpoint-attached heparin efficiently deplete activated platelets, pEVs, PF4, HMGB1 and histones/nucleosomes. We propose that this elimination of central effectors of immunothrombosis, rather than direct binding of pathogens, could be of clinical relevance for mitigating thrombotic complications in sepsis or COVID-19 using heparin-functionalized adsorbents.


Subject(s)
Blood Proteins/isolation & purification , Heparin/pharmacology , /drug therapy , Blood Coagulation/physiology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , HMGB Proteins/isolation & purification , HMGB Proteins/metabolism , HMGB1 Protein/isolation & purification , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Heparin/metabolism , Histones/isolation & purification , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Neutrophils/metabolism , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Factor 4/isolation & purification , Platelet Factor 4/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/metabolism , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Thrombosis/drug therapy
4.
Blood ; 138(16): 1481-1489, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484294

ABSTRACT

A subset of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) become critically ill, suffering from severe respiratory problems and also increased rates of thrombosis. The causes of thrombosis in severely ill patients with COVID-19 are still emerging, but the coincidence of critical illness with the timing of the onset of adaptive immunity could implicate an excessive immune response. We hypothesized that platelets might be susceptible to activation by anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (anti-SARS-CoV-2) antibodies and might contribute to thrombosis. We found that immune complexes containing recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and anti-spike immunoglobulin G enhanced platelet-mediated thrombosis on von Willebrand factor in vitro, but only when the glycosylation state of the Fc domain was modified to correspond with the aberrant glycosylation previously identified in patients with severe COVID-19. Furthermore, we found that activation was dependent on FcγRIIA, and we provide in vitro evidence that this pathogenic platelet activation can be counteracted by the therapeutic small molecules R406 (fostamatinib) and ibrutinib, which inhibit tyrosine kinases Syk and Btk, respectively, or by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigen-Antibody Complex/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , von Willebrand Factor/genetics
5.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 379-385, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483188

ABSTRACT

In 2019 first reports about a new human coronavirus emerged, which causes common cold symptoms as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The virus was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and severe thrombotic events including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and microthrombi emerged as additional symptoms. Heart failure, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and stroke have also been observed. As main mediator of thrombus formation, platelets became one of the key aspects in SARS-CoV-2 research. Platelets may also directly interact with SARS-CoV-2 and have been shown to carry the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Platelets can also facilitate the virus uptake by secretion of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase furin. Cleavage of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein by furin enhances binding capabilities and virus entry into various cell types. In COVID-19 patients, platelet count differs between mild and serious infections. Patients with mild symptoms have a slightly increased platelet count, whereas thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of severe COVID-19 infections. Low platelet count can be attributed to platelet apoptosis and the incorporation of platelets into microthrombi (peripheral consumption) and severe thrombotic events. The observed excessive formation of thrombi is due to hyperactivation of platelets caused by the infection. Various factors have been suggested in the activation of platelets in COVID-19, such as hypoxia, vessel damage, inflammatory factors, NETosis, SARS-CoV-2 interaction, autoimmune reactions, and autocrine activation. COVID-19 does alter chemokine and cytokine plasma concentrations. Platelet chemokine profiles are altered in COVID-19 and contribute to the described chemokine storms observed in severely ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokines/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409707

ABSTRACT

Global data correlate severe vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, further suggesting the presence of a hypercoagulable state in severe COVID-19 patients, which could promote thrombosis in the lungs and in other organs. The feedback loop between COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and vitamin D also involves platelets (PLTs), since vitamin D deficiency stimulates PLT activation and aggregation and increases fibrinolysis and thrombosis. Vitamin D and PLTs share and play specific roles not only in coagulation and thrombosis but also during inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and immune response. Additionally, another 'fil rouge' between vitamin D and PLTs is represented by their role in mineral metabolism and bone health, since vitamin D deficiency, low PLT count, and altered PLT-related parameters are linked to abnormal bone remodeling in certain pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis (OP). Hence, it is possible to speculate that severe COVID-19 patients are characterized by the presence of several predisposing factors to bone fragility and OP that may be monitored to avoid potential complications. Here, we hypothesize different pervasive actions of vitamin D and PLT association in COVID-19, also allowing for potential preliminary information on bone health status during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Osteoporosis/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Bone Remodeling/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Feedback, Physiological , Humans , Osteoporosis/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716361, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399137

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pathology is associated with exuberant inflammation, vascular damage, and activation of coagulation. In addition, complement activation has been described and is linked to disease pathology. However, few studies have been conducted in cancer patients. Objective: This study examined complement activation in response to COVID-19 in the setting of cancer associated thromboinflammation. Methods: Markers of complement activation (C3a, C5a, sC5b-9) and complement inhibitors (Factor H, C1-Inhibitor) were evaluated in plasma of cancer patients with (n=43) and without (n=43) COVID-19 and stratified based on elevated plasma D-dimer levels (>1.0 µg/ml FEU). Markers of vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and platelet activation (ICAM-1, thrombomodulin, P-selectin) as well as systemic inflammation (pentraxin-3, serum amyloid A, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor) were analyzed to further evaluate the inflammatory response. Results: Increases in circulating markers of endothelial cell dysfunction, platelet activation, and systemic inflammation were noted in cancer patients with COVID-19. In contrast, complement activation increased in cancer patients with COVID-19 and elevated D-dimers. This was accompanied by decreased C1-Inhibitor levels in patients with D-dimers > 5 ug/ml FEU. Conclusion: Complement activation in cancer patients with COVID-19 is significantly increased in the setting of thromboinflammation. These findings support a link between coagulation and complement cascades in the setting of inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Complement Activation/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Complement Inactivating Agents/blood , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/blood , Young Adult
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 728513, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394762

ABSTRACT

VITT is a rare, life-threatening syndrome characterized by thrombotic symptoms in combination with thrombocytopenia, which may occur in individuals receiving the first administration of adenoviral non replicating vectors (AVV) anti Covid19 vaccines. Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is characterized by high levels of serum IgG that bind PF4/polyanion complexes, thus triggering platelet activation. Therefore, identification of the fine pathophysiological mechanism by which vaccine components trigger platelet activation is mandatory. Herein, we propose a multistep mechanism involving both the AVV and the neo-synthetized Spike protein. The former can: i) spread rapidly into blood stream, ii), promote the early production of high levels of IL-6, iii) interact with erythrocytes, platelets, mast cells and endothelia, iv) favor the presence of extracellular DNA at the site of injection, v) activate platelets and mast cells to release PF4 and heparin. Moreover, AVV infection of mast cells may trigger aberrant inflammatory and immune responses in people affected by the mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). The pre-existence of natural antibodies binding PF4/heparin complexes may amplify platelet activation and thrombotic events. Finally, neosynthesized Covid 19 Spike protein interacting with its ACE2 receptor on endothelia, platelets and leucocyte may trigger further thrombotic events unleashing the WITT syndrome.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/physiopathology , Adenoviridae/genetics , Animals , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Genetic Vectors , Humans , Mice , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Factor 4 , Rabbits
9.
J Autoimmun ; 121: 102662, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385817

ABSTRACT

Herein, we consider venous immunothrombotic mechanisms in SARS-CoV-2 infection and anti-SARS-CoV-2 DNA vaccination. Primary SARS-CoV-2 infection with systemic viral RNA release (RNAaemia) contributes to innate immune coagulation cascade activation, with both pulmonary and systemic immunothrombosis - including venous territory strokes. However, anti-SARS-CoV-2 adenoviral-vectored-DNA vaccines -initially shown for the ChAdOx1 vaccine-may rarely exhibit autoimmunity with autoantibodies to Platelet Factor-4 (PF4) that is termed Vaccine-Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia (VITT), an entity pathophysiologically similar to Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT). The PF4 autoantigen is a polyanion molecule capable of independent interactions with negatively charged bacterial cellular wall, heparin and DNA molecules, thus linking intravascular innate immunity to both bacterial cell walls and pathogen-derived DNA. Crucially, negatively charged extracellular DNA is a powerful adjuvant that can break tolerance to positively charged nuclear histone proteins in many experimental autoimmunity settings, including SLE and scleroderma. Analogous to DNA-histone interactons, positively charged PF4-DNA complexes stimulate strong interferon responses via Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 9 engagement. A chain of events following intramuscular adenoviral-vectored-DNA vaccine inoculation including microvascular damage; microbleeding and platelet activation with PF4 release, adenovirus cargo dispersement with DNA-PF4 engagement may rarely break immune tolerance, leading to rare PF4-directed autoimmunity. The VITT cavernous sinus cerebral and intestinal venous territory immunothrombosis proclivity may pertain to venous drainage of shared microbiotal-rich areas of the nose and in intestines that initiates local endovascular venous immunity by PF4/microbiotal engagement with PF4 autoantibody driven immunothrombosis reminiscent of HIT. According to the proposed model, any adenovirus-vectored-DNA vaccine could drive autoimmune VITT in susceptible individuals and alternative mechanism based on molecular mimicry, vaccine protein contaminants, adenovirus vector proteins, EDTA buffers or immunity against the viral spike protein are secondary factors. Hence, electrochemical DNA-PF4 interactions and PF4-heparin interactions, but at different locations, represent the common denominator in HIT and VITT related autoimmune-mediated thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/pathology , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Thrombosis/pathology , Vaccines/immunology
10.
J Biomed Sci ; 28(1): 46, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266487

ABSTRACT

Dysregulated formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is observed in acute viral infections. Moreover, NETs contribute to the pathogenesis of acute viral infections, including those caused by the dengue virus (DV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Furthermore, excessive NET formation (NETosis) is associated with disease severity in patients suffering from SARS-CoV-2-induced multiple organ injuries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and other members of C-type lectin family (L-SIGN, LSECtin, CLEC10A) have been reported to interact with viral glycans to facilitate virus spreading and exacerbates inflammatory reactions. Moreover, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk)-coupled C-type lectin member 5A (CLEC5A) has been shown as the pattern recognition receptor for members of flaviviruses, and is responsible for DV-induced cytokine storm and Japanese encephalomyelitis virus (JEV)-induced neuronal inflammation. Moreover, DV activates platelets via CLEC2 to release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes (EXOs). The DV-activated EXOs (DV-EXOs) and MVs (DV-MVs) stimulate CLEC5A and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), respectively, to enhance NET formation and inflammatory reactions. Thus, EVs from virus-activated platelets (PLT-EVs) are potent endogenous danger signals, and blockade of C-type lectins is a promising strategy to attenuate virus-induced NETosis and intravascular coagulopathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Encephalitis Virus, Japanese/immunology , Encephalitis, Japanese/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Lectins, C-Type/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Encephalitis, Japanese/pathology , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology
11.
Mol Cell Biochem ; 476(10): 3815-3825, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263168

ABSTRACT

Chagas and COVID-19 are diseases caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and SARS-CoV-2, respectively. These diseases present very different etiological agents despite showing similarities such as susceptibility/risk factors, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), recognition of glycosaminoglycans, inflammation, vascular leakage hypercoagulability, microthrombosis, and endotheliopathy; all of which suggest, in part, treatments with similar principles. Here, both diseases are compared, focusing mainly on the characteristics related to dysregulated immunothrombosis. Given the in-depth investigation of molecules and mechanisms related to microthrombosis in COVID-19, it is necessary to reconsider a prompt treatment of Chagas disease with oral anticoagulants.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , Chagas Disease/pathology , Heparitin Sulfate/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/pathology , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Chagas Disease/immunology , Complement Activation/immunology , Endothelium/pathology , Humans , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/immunology , Platelet Activation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Trypanosoma cruzi/immunology
12.
Blood ; 137(26): 3656-3659, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215090

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is crucial in combatting the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic. The rare complication of thrombocytopenia and thrombotic complications at unusual sites after ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccination is caused by platelet-activating antibodies directed against platelet factor 4 (PF4). We present a widely applicable whole-blood standard flow cytometric assay to identify the pathogenic antibodies associated with vaccine-induced immune-mediated thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) after ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccination. This assay will enable rapid diagnosis by many laboratories. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT04370119.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Flow Cytometry/methods , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/diagnosis , Receptors, IgG/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects , Antibody Specificity , Autoantibodies/biosynthesis , Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Heparin/adverse effects , Heparin/immunology , Humans , Immunoenzyme Techniques , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , P-Selectin/analysis , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology
13.
Platelets ; 32(3): 325-330, 2021 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092288

ABSTRACT

Platelets play an essential role in maintaining vascular integrity after injury. In addition, platelets contribute to the immune response to pathogens. For instance, they express receptors that mediate binding of viruses, and toll-like receptors that activate the cell in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Platelets can be beneficial and/or detrimental during viral infections. They reduce blood-borne viruses by engulfing the free virus and presenting the virus to neutrophils. However, platelets can also enhance inflammation and tissue injury during viral infections. Here, we discuss the roles of platelets in viral infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Viruses/immunology , Animals , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Communication/genetics , Cell Communication/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/pathology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Lymphocytes/virology , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Platelet Activation/immunology , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viruses/pathogenicity
14.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 22418, 2020 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997951

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected over forty million patients worldwide. Although most coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients have a good prognosis, some develop severe illness. Markers that define disease severity or predict clinical outcome need to be urgently developed as the mortality rate in critical cases is approximately 61.5%. In the present study, we performed in-depth proteome profiling of undepleted plasma from eight COVID-19 patients. Quantitative proteomic analysis using the BoxCar method revealed that 91 out of 1222 quantified proteins were differentially expressed depending on the severity of COVID-19. Importantly, we found 76 proteins, previously not reported, which could be novel prognostic biomarker candidates. Our plasma proteome signatures captured the host response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, thereby highlighting the role of neutrophil activation, complement activation, platelet function, and T cell suppression as well as proinflammatory factors upstream and downstream of interleukin-6, interleukin-1B, and tumor necrosis factor. Consequently, this study supports the development of blood biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets to aid clinical decision-making and subsequently improve prognosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Proteins/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid , Complement Activation/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Middle Aged , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Platelet Activation/immunology , Proteome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Suppressor Factors, Immunologic/blood , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
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