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1.
Ann Intern Med ; 175(7): JC80, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924594

ABSTRACT

SOURCE CITATION: REMAP-CAP Writing Committee for the REMAP-CAP Investigators. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on survival and organ support-free days in critically ill patients with COVID-19: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2022;327:1247-59. 35315874.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Bull Exp Biol Med ; 173(1): 41-45, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1919840

ABSTRACT

We studied the effect of antiviral agent riamilovir on ADP-induced platelet aggregation in the absence and presence of LPS. Unlike acetylsalicylic acid (reference drug), riamilovir did not exhibit antiplatelet effect in vitro. However, it markedly suppressed platelet reactivity in LPS-treated blood samples and was 2.2-fold superior to acetylsalicylic acid in terms of IC50 value. In in vivo experiments, riamilovir under conditions of hypercytokinemia blocked platelet aggregation in rats by 64%.


Subject(s)
Lipopolysaccharides , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Aspirin/pharmacology , Blood Platelets , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Rats , Triazines , Triazoles
3.
Molecules ; 27(14)2022 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917640

ABSTRACT

Different pathological conditions, including viral infections and cancer, can have a massive impact on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing severe damage to the cell and exacerbating the disease. In particular, coronavirus infections, including SARS coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for COVID-19, cause ER stress as a consequence of the enormous amounts of viral glycoproteins synthesized, the perturbation of ER homeostasis and the modification of ER membranes. Therefore, ER has a central role in the viral life cycle, thus representing one of the Achilles' heels on which to focus therapeutic intervention. On the other hand, prolonged ER stress has been demonstrated to promote many pro-tumoral attributes in cancer cells, having a key role in tumor growth, metastasis and response to therapies. In this report, adopting a repurposing approach of approved drugs, we identified the antiplatelet agent ticlopidine as an interferent of the unfolded protein response (UPR) via sigma receptors (SRs) modulation. The promising results obtained suggest the potential use of ticlopidine to counteract ER stress induced by viral infections, such as COVID-19, and cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ticlopidine/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response
5.
Drug Metab Pers Ther ; 37(1): 35-40, 2021 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855056

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To mitigate the incidence of recurrent stroke in patients, dual antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin and clopidogrel is usually administered. Clopidogrel is a prodrug and its bioactivation is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C19. The main objective of this work was to determine the prevalence of CYP2C19*2 carriers in Saudi ischemic stroke patients and assess the suitability of using genotyping to guide antiplatelet therapy in a university hospital setup. METHODS: This prospective (2018-2019) study was conducted on 256 patients (age 61 ± 12.5) clinically diagnosed with ischemic stroke who were genotyped using Spartan RX CYP2C19 assay. RESULTS: From the total patient group (256), upon admission, 210 patients were prescribed either aspirin, clopidogrel or dual antiplatelet therapy. Of the 27 patients with the CYP2C19*2 allele who were prescribed clopidogrel (18) or dual antiplatelet therapy (9), only 21 patients could be followed up for a period of six months post stroke event, in addition to 21 age- and sex-matched patients with the normal allele. The CYP2C19*2 allele carriers had a statistically significant increased risk of recurrent stroke compared to patients carrying the normal allele. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the suitability of using genotyping to guide antiplatelet therapy in ischemic stroke patients in a clinical setting.


Subject(s)
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C19 , Ischemic Stroke , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Aged , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Clopidogrel/therapeutic use , Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C19/genetics , Genotype , Hospitals , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Ischemic Stroke/genetics , Middle Aged , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
8.
JAMA ; 327(13): 1247-1259, 2022 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1801957

ABSTRACT

Importance: The efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in critically ill patients with COVID-19 is uncertain. Objective: To determine whether antiplatelet therapy improves outcomes for critically ill adults with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: In an ongoing adaptive platform trial (REMAP-CAP) testing multiple interventions within multiple therapeutic domains, 1557 critically ill adult patients with COVID-19 were enrolled between October 30, 2020, and June 23, 2021, from 105 sites in 8 countries and followed up for 90 days (final follow-up date: July 26, 2021). Interventions: Patients were randomized to receive either open-label aspirin (n = 565), a P2Y12 inhibitor (n = 455), or no antiplatelet therapy (control; n = 529). Interventions were continued in the hospital for a maximum of 14 days and were in addition to anticoagulation thromboprophylaxis. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was organ support-free days (days alive and free of intensive care unit-based respiratory or cardiovascular organ support) within 21 days, ranging from -1 for any death in hospital (censored at 90 days) to 22 for survivors with no organ support. There were 13 secondary outcomes, including survival to discharge and major bleeding to 14 days. The primary analysis was a bayesian cumulative logistic model. An odds ratio (OR) greater than 1 represented improved survival, more organ support-free days, or both. Efficacy was defined as greater than 99% posterior probability of an OR greater than 1. Futility was defined as greater than 95% posterior probability of an OR less than 1.2 vs control. Intervention equivalence was defined as greater than 90% probability that the OR (compared with each other) was between 1/1.2 and 1.2 for 2 noncontrol interventions. Results: The aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitor groups met the predefined criteria for equivalence at an adaptive analysis and were statistically pooled for further analysis. Enrollment was discontinued after the prespecified criterion for futility was met for the pooled antiplatelet group compared with control. Among the 1557 critically ill patients randomized, 8 patients withdrew consent and 1549 completed the trial (median age, 57 years; 521 [33.6%] female). The median for organ support-free days was 7 (IQR, -1 to 16) in both the antiplatelet and control groups (median-adjusted OR, 1.02 [95% credible interval {CrI}, 0.86-1.23]; 95.7% posterior probability of futility). The proportions of patients surviving to hospital discharge were 71.5% (723/1011) and 67.9% (354/521) in the antiplatelet and control groups, respectively (median-adjusted OR, 1.27 [95% CrI, 0.99-1.62]; adjusted absolute difference, 5% [95% CrI, -0.2% to 9.5%]; 97% posterior probability of efficacy). Among survivors, the median for organ support-free days was 14 in both groups. Major bleeding occurred in 2.1% and 0.4% of patients in the antiplatelet and control groups (adjusted OR, 2.97 [95% CrI, 1.23-8.28]; adjusted absolute risk increase, 0.8% [95% CrI, 0.1%-2.7%]; 99.4% probability of harm). Conclusions and Relevance: Among critically ill patients with COVID-19, treatment with an antiplatelet agent, compared with no antiplatelet agent, had a low likelihood of providing improvement in the number of organ support-free days within 21 days. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02735707.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Venous Thromboembolism , Adult , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Aspirin/adverse effects , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
9.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(3): 16-21, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1786402

ABSTRACT

Numerous studies demonstrate that a new coronavirus infection is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis, which underlies many of the complications of COVID-19. At the same time, many elderly patients with COVID-19 and with concomitant cordial pathology receive antiplatelet therapy to prevent recurrent ischemic events. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of antiplatelet therapy on the risk of thrombotic complications and disease course in SARS-COV-2 infected patients. We carried out the search of the articles published from 2019 to 2021 with the keywords «antiplatelet therapy¼ and «COVID-19¼ in the PubMed database. A total of 209 articles were retrieved out of which 16 which were included in the review. According to majority of retrospective studies (7 out of 10 studies, more than 30.000 patients), antiplatelet therapy is associated with a statistically significant and prominent reduction in overall mortality. Several studies showed that antiplatelet therapy positively influences the risks of severe respiratory disorders, need of invasive lung ventilation and decreases the probability of thrombotic events. However the only prospective randomized placebo-controlled study did not show a benefit of antiplatelet therapy in symptomatic patients with mild stable COPD-19. None of the studies reported a negative effect of antiplatelet therapy on the course of a new coronavirus infection. Therefore, to date there is no conclusive evidence based on prospective randomized trials, of a positive effect of antiplatelet therapy on the course of COVID-19. Further research on this issue using the double-blind method is needed. However, there are no reports of significant adverse effects of antiplatelet agents, who have previously been given antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Aged , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/prevention & control
10.
Perm J ; 252021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766163

ABSTRACT

This case report describes a successful outcome involving a patient with severe COVID-19 viral pneumonia utilizing a novel therapeutic approach with the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, eptifibatide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Eptifibatide , Humans , Peptides/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
11.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 88(6): 472-478, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Platelet activation at the early stage of COVID-19 is poorly described. The need for antiplatelet therapy in patients with COVID-19 remains controversial. We characterized the platelet activation profile in hospitalized patients at the early stage of COVID-19 using the modified prothrombinase Platelet Activation State (PAS) Assay. METHODS: Sixteen patients admitted to the emergency department of the IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy) between February 8 and April 2021 were enrolled. All patients presented with respiratory symptoms and tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Platelet activation was measured via the PAS Assay within 24 hours from patients' hospital admission. Data were compared with those measured in N.=24 healthy subjects (controls). RESULTS: Platelet activation was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients with respect to controls (PAS=0.63 [0.58-0.98%] vs. 0.46 [0.40-0.65%], respectively; P=0.03). Of note, highest PAS values were measured in the two patients with the worst clinical outcome, i.e., death because of respiratory failure (PAS=2.09% and 1.20%, respectively). No differences in standard coagulation parameters were noted between these two patients and those who were later discharged home. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of significant platelet activation state at the early stage of COVID-19 and suggests that the patient-specific platelet activation profile is a reliable clinical marker to stratify COVID-19 patients at high risk of poor clinical outcome who might potentially benefit from antiplatelet therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Humans , Platelet Activation , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 205(3): 324-329, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673593

ABSTRACT

Rationale: The mortality in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) who require mechanical ventilation remains high, and endotheliopathy has been implicated. Objectives: To determine the effect of prostacyclin infusion in mechanically ventilated patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 with severe endotheliopathy. Methods: We conducted a multicenter, randomized clinical trial in adults infected with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) who required mechanical ventilation and had a plasma level of thrombomodulin >4 ng/ml; patients were randomized to 72-hour infusion of prostacyclin 1 ng/kg/min or placebo. Measurements and Main Results: The main outcome was the number of days alive and without mechanical ventilation within 28 days. Key secondary outcomes were 28-day mortality and serious adverse events within 7 days. Eighty patients were randomized (41 prostacyclin and 39 placebo). The median number of days alive without mechanical ventilation at 28 days was 16.0 days (SD, 12) versus 5.0 days (SD, 10) (difference of the medians, 10.96 days; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5 to 21; P = 0.07) in the prostacyclin and the placebo groups, respectively. The 28-day mortality was 21.9% versus 43.6% in the prostacyclin and the placebo groups, respectively (risk ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.96; P = 0.06). The incidence of serious adverse events within 7 days was 2.4% versus 12.8% (risk ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.001 to 1.11; P = 0.10) in the prostacyclin and the placebo groups, respectively. Conclusions: Prostacyclin was not associated with a significant reduction in the number of days alive and without mechanical ventilation within 28 days. The point estimates, however, favored the prostacyclin group in all analyses, including 28-day mortality, warranting further investigation in larger trials. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04420741); EudraCT Identifier: 2020-001296-33.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Epoprostenol/administration & dosage , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Denmark , Female , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Intubation, Intratracheal , Male , Middle Aged , Survival Rate , Thrombomodulin/blood , Treatment Outcome
14.
JAMA ; 327(3): 227-236, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669289

ABSTRACT

Importance: Platelets represent a potential therapeutic target for improved clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Objective: To evaluate the benefits and risks of adding a P2Y12 inhibitor to anticoagulant therapy among non-critically ill patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: An open-label, bayesian, adaptive randomized clinical trial including 562 non-critically ill patients hospitalized for COVID-19 was conducted between February 2021 and June 2021 at 60 hospitals in Brazil, Italy, Spain, and the US. The date of final 90-day follow-up was September 15, 2021. Interventions: Patients were randomized to a therapeutic dose of heparin plus a P2Y12 inhibitor (n = 293) or a therapeutic dose of heparin only (usual care) (n = 269) in a 1:1 ratio for 14 days or until hospital discharge, whichever was sooner. Ticagrelor was the preferred P2Y12 inhibitor. Main Outcomes and Measures: The composite primary outcome was organ support-free days evaluated on an ordinal scale that combined in-hospital death (assigned a value of -1) and, for those who survived to hospital discharge, the number of days free of respiratory or cardiovascular organ support up to day 21 of the index hospitalization (range, -1 to 21 days; higher scores indicate less organ support and better outcomes). The primary safety outcome was major bleeding by 28 days as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis. Results: Enrollment of non-critically ill patients was discontinued when the prespecified criterion for futility was met. All 562 patients who were randomized (mean age, 52.7 [SD, 13.5] years; 41.5% women) completed the trial and 87% received a therapeutic dose of heparin by the end of study day 1. In the P2Y12 inhibitor group, ticagrelor was used in 63% of patients and clopidogrel in 37%. The median number of organ support-free days was 21 days (IQR, 20-21 days) among patients in the P2Y12 inhibitor group and was 21 days (IQR, 21-21 days) in the usual care group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.83 [95% credible interval, 0.55-1.25]; posterior probability of futility [defined as an odds ratio <1.2], 96%). Major bleeding occurred in 6 patients (2.0%) in the P2Y12 inhibitor group and in 2 patients (0.7%) in the usual care group (adjusted odds ratio, 3.31 [95% CI, 0.64-17.2]; P = .15). Conclusions and Relevance: Among non-critically ill patients hospitalized for COVID-19, the use of a P2Y12 inhibitor in addition to a therapeutic dose of heparin, compared with a therapeutic dose of heparin only, did not result in an increased odds of improvement in organ support-free days within 21 days during hospitalization. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04505774.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Heparin/administration & dosage , Inpatients , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Clopidogrel/administration & dosage , Clopidogrel/adverse effects , Comorbidity , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Heparin/adverse effects , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Medical Futility , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Platelet Activation/drug effects , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Receptors, Purinergic P2Y12 , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Ticagrelor/administration & dosage , Ticagrelor/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
15.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 28: 10760296211073922, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COMPASS trial demonstrated that in patients with peripheral arterial disease, the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin compared with aspirin reduces the risk of major adverse limb events, but it is not known whether this combination can also improve symptoms in patients with intermittent claudication. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of the combination on claudication distance. STUDY DESIGN: Eighty-eight patients with intermittent claudication will be randomized to receive rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily or aspirin 100 mg once daily for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is the change in claudication distance from the baseline to 24 weeks, measured by 6 min walking test and treadmill test. The primary safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding according to the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis criteria. SUMMARY: The COMPASS CLAUDICATION trial will provide high-quality evidence regarding the effect of the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin on claudication distance in patients with peripheral arterial disease.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , Intermittent Claudication/drug therapy , Peripheral Arterial Disease/drug therapy , Double-Blind Method , Drug Therapy, Combination , Exercise Test , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intermittent Claudication/diagnosis , Intermittent Claudication/etiology , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prospective Studies , Rivaroxaban/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
16.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 28: 10760296221074353, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650421

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although initial reports concentrated on severe respiratory illness, emerging literature has indicated a substantially elevated risk of thromboembolic events in patients with COVID-19 disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokine release has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and activation of coagulation pathways, as evident by elevated D-dimer levels and deranged coagulation parameters. Both macrovascular and microvascular thromboses have been described in observational cohort and post-mortem studies. Concurrently, preliminary data have suggested the role of therapeutic anticoagulation in preventing major thromboembolic complications in moderately but not critically ill patients. However, pending results from randomized controlled trials, clear guidance is lacking regarding the intensity and duration of anticoagulation in such patients. Herein, we review the existing evidence on incidence and pathophysiology of COVID-19 related thromboembolic complications and guide anticoagulation therapy based on current literature and societal consensus statements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/etiology , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Illness , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
20.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211066945, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574469

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Argatroban is licensed for patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and is conventionally monitored by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) ratio. The target range is 1.5 to 3.0 times the patients' baseline APTT and not exceeding 100 s, however this baseline is not always known. APTT is known to plateau at higher levels of argatroban, and is influenced by coagulopathies, lupus anticoagulant and raised FVIII levels. It has been used as a treatment for COVID-19 and Vaccine-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis (VITT). Some recent publications have favored the use of anti-IIa methods to determine the plasma drug concentration of argatroban. METHODS: Plasma of 60 samples from 3 COVID-19 patients and 54 samples from 5 VITT patients were tested by APTT ratio and anti-IIa method (dilute thrombin time dTT). Actin FS APTT ratios were derived from the baseline APTT of the patient and the mean normal APTT. RESULTS: Mean APTT ratio derived from baseline was 1.71 (COVID-19), 1.33 (VITT) compared to APTT ratio by mean normal 1.65 (COVID-19), 1.48 (VITT). dTT mean concentration was 0.64 µg/ml (COVID-19) 0.53 µg/ml (VITT) with poor correlations to COVID-19 baseline APTT ratio r2 = 0.1526 p <0.0001, mean normal r2 = 0.2188 p < 0.0001; VITT baseline APTT ratio r2 = 0.04 p < 0.001, VITT mean normal r2 = 0.0064 p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that dTT is a superior method to monitor the concentration of argatroban, we have demonstrated significant differences between APTT ratios and dTT levels, which could have clinical impact. This is especially so in COVID-19 and VITT.


Subject(s)
Arginine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Partial Thromboplastin Time/methods , Pipecolic Acids/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombocytopenia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Aged , Arginine/pharmacology , Arginine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pipecolic Acids/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombosis/chemically induced
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