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1.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 80(11): 692-698, 2023 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244784

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Antithrombotic agents have a role in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treatment, but the pandemic disrupted medication supply. This study examined changes in the volume of oral and parenteral anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications at US hospitals during the pandemic. METHODS: IQVIA National Sales Perspective (NSP) data was used to determine the monthly volume of anticoagulants and antiplatelets purchased at US hospitals between January 2018 and February 2021. Mean monthly medication volumes, reported as extended units (EUs), and year-over-year changes in medication volume were determined. A single-group interrupted time series analysis was used to evaluate changes in the rate of growth of monthly medication volumes before (January 2019-February 2020) and during (March 2020-February 2021) the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Overall, there was a 43.4% decline in the total volume of anticoagulants and antiplatelets at US hospitals in March 2020, driven by a decrease in heparin volume. Mean monthly volumes decreased significantly (P < 0.05) for parenteral anticoagulants (-106,691,340 EU [95% CI, -200,033,910 to -13,348,780]), oral anticoagulants (-354,800 EU [95% CI, -612,180 to -97,420]), and parenteral antiplatelets (-391,880 EU [95% CI, -535,420 to -248,330]). During the pandemic, the monthly volume of oral anticoagulants, parenteral anticoagulants, and parenteral antiplatelets grew significantly more than in the prepandemic period. This growth was primarily seen in volumes of apixaban, argatroban, enoxaparin, heparin, eptifibatide, and tirofiban. Apixaban and heparin volumes continued a prepandemic uptrend, while argatroban and eptifibatide volumes reversed trend. CONCLUSION: Rapid changes in anticoagulant and antiplatelet volume at US hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic highlight the need for institutional protocols to manage fluctuating medication volume demands.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants , COVID-19 , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Eptifibatide , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heparin , Hospitals
2.
Bioorg Med Chem Lett ; 87: 129283, 2023 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291735

ABSTRACT

Development of novel agents that prevent thrombotic events is an urgent task considering increasing incidence of cardiovascular diseases and coagulopathies that accompany cancer and COVID-19. Enzymatic assay identified novel GSK3ß inhibitors in a series of 3-arylidene-2-oxindole derivatives. Considering the putative role of GSK3ß in platelet activation, the most active compounds were evaluated for antiplatelet activity and antithrombotic activity. It was found that GSK3ß inhibition by 2-oxindoles correlates with inhibition of platelet activation only for compounds 1b and 5a. Albeit, in vitro antiplatelet activity matched well with in vivo anti-thrombosis activity. The most active GSK3ß inhibitor 5a exceeds antiplatelet activity of acetylsalicylic acid in vitro by 10.3 times and antithrombotic activity in vivo by 18.7 times (ED50 7.3 mg/kg). These results support the promising role of GSK3ß inhibitors for development of novel antithrombotic agents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Oxindoles/pharmacology , Fibrinolytic Agents/pharmacology , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Platelet Aggregation
4.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 59(1)2022 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2227497

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is essential in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antiplatelet medication in our practice and to investigate the factors that influence it. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort observational study was conducted, in which 193 patients with ACS were enrolled. The patients were stented in the catheterization laboratory between May 2019 and October 2020, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and were receiving DAPT. Their platelet functions were tested using a Multiplate Analyzer. In addition to this, clinical data, demographics, laboratory tests, and cardiovascular risk factors were also analyzed. Results: 43.46% of the patients treated with aspirin were found to be resistant to it. This phenomenon was more common in men (48.17% vs. 31.48%, p = 0.036), and it was associated with being under the age of 50 (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.11-3.90) and weighing over 70 kg (OR: 3.00; 95% CI: 1.21-7.40). Most of the patients treated with clopidogrel were in the optimal treatment window, while about half of the patients treated with ticagrelor had an exaggerated pharmacological response. Among the laboratory parameters, leukocytosis and platelet count were found to be determinants of platelet reactivity for both the aspirin and ticagrelor treatments. Conclusions: Many patients treated with antiplatelet agents are outside of the treatment window. The results obtained showed that low doses of gastro-resistant aspirin tablets are ineffective, and their efficacy can be influenced by various clinical and laboratory factors. Patients receiving ticagrelor have significantly reduced platelet reactivity, influenced only by certain laboratory indicators. The pandemic significantly influenced the results of the platelet aggregation tests only in patients treated with clopidogrel.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Male , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Clopidogrel/therapeutic use , Ticagrelor/therapeutic use , Ticagrelor/pharmacology , Pandemics , Ticlopidine/therapeutic use , Ticlopidine/pharmacology , Prospective Studies , Acute Coronary Syndrome/drug therapy , Platelet Aggregation , Adenosine/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
5.
Crit Pathw Cardiol ; 21(3): 114-122, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063048

ABSTRACT

An international panel of expert clinicians and researchers in acute cardiac care was convened to review, describe, and contextualize their varied experiences delivering care and maintaining ongoing research during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. A proposed perspective from which care and outcomes could be viewed was the possibility that without routine follow-up and as-accustomed interactions with their care team, patients at risk of acute atherothrombotic events might be less adherent to prescribed antiplatelet medications. This might be manifested by more emergency coronary events or by an increased (and perhaps unidentifiable) incidence of out-of-hospital cardiovascular deaths related to patient anxiety about presenting to hospital during the pandemic. The experiences of the panel members were similar in many regards, which identified opportunities for improvement in cardiac care the next time there is a substantial disruption of usual practice. Regardless of geography or payor system, there was an identified need for better remote care platforms; but stronger infrastructure and consumer facility with remote care technology, improved provider-patient communication to help ensure adherence to primary and secondary prevention medications, and longer-term prescription fills and no-hassle refills on such medications. Profound disruptions in acute cardiovascular research highlighted the need for redundancy or back-up planning for teams engaged in time-sensitive research, to ensure both continuity of protocols and patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Internationality , Pandemics/prevention & control , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Secondary Prevention
6.
Drug Des Devel Ther ; 16: 2559-2568, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993628

ABSTRACT

Background: Antiplatelet drugs, such as ticagrelor, which target platelet P2Y12 receptors, are used for prevention of ischemic heart disease. Ticagrelor is also known to have pleiotropic effects of unknown mechanisms. Ticagrelor could influence the expression of molecules involved in resolution of inflammation. This study aimed to investigate if ticagrelor could change the expression of CYP4F2 and its encoded protein concentration and, additionally, to determine ticagrelor possible antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria. Methods: CYP4F2 expression was determined in HUVEC and HepG2 cell lines by qPCR. CYP4F2 protein concentration was determined by ELISA. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using a disc diffusion method. Results: Ticagrelor was observed to reduce the expression of CYP4F2 in HUVEC and HepG2 cell lines. It also reduced CYP4F2 protein levels in HUVEC cells. Ticagrelor had no bactericidal activity against gram-negative third generation cephalosporin resistant E. coli. Conclusion: Ticagrelor reduced CYP4F2 protein concentration in HUVEC, and CYP4F2 expression in HUVEC and HepG2 cells, but had no effect on third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli strains.


Subject(s)
Escherichia coli , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Blood Platelets , Cephalosporins/pharmacology , Escherichia coli/genetics , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Ticagrelor/pharmacology
7.
Ann Intern Med ; 175(7): JC80, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964535

ABSTRACT

SOURCE CITATION: REMAP-CAP Writing Committee for the REMAP-CAP Investigators. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on survival and organ support-free days in critically ill patients with COVID-19: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2022;327:1247-59. 35315874.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness/therapy , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Molecules ; 27(14)2022 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917640

ABSTRACT

Different pathological conditions, including viral infections and cancer, can have a massive impact on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing severe damage to the cell and exacerbating the disease. In particular, coronavirus infections, including SARS coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for COVID-19, cause ER stress as a consequence of the enormous amounts of viral glycoproteins synthesized, the perturbation of ER homeostasis and the modification of ER membranes. Therefore, ER has a central role in the viral life cycle, thus representing one of the Achilles' heels on which to focus therapeutic intervention. On the other hand, prolonged ER stress has been demonstrated to promote many pro-tumoral attributes in cancer cells, having a key role in tumor growth, metastasis and response to therapies. In this report, adopting a repurposing approach of approved drugs, we identified the antiplatelet agent ticlopidine as an interferent of the unfolded protein response (UPR) via sigma receptors (SRs) modulation. The promising results obtained suggest the potential use of ticlopidine to counteract ER stress induced by viral infections, such as COVID-19, and cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Neoplasms , Drug Repositioning , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ticlopidine/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response
9.
J Thromb Haemost ; 20(10): 2226-2236, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916260

ABSTRACT

Despite the emergence of high quality randomized trial data with the use of antithrombotic agents to reduce the risk of thromboembolism, end-organ failure, and possibly mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), questions still remain as to optimal patient selection for these strategies, the use of antithrombotics in outpatient settings and in-hospital settings (including critical care units), thromboprophylaxis in special patient populations, and the management of acute thrombosis in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. In October 2021, the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) formed a multidisciplinary and international panel of content experts, two patient representatives, and a methodologist to develop recommendations on treatment with anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents for COVID-19 patients. The ISTH Guideline panel discussed additional topics to be well suited to a non-Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) for Good Practice Statements (GPS) to support good clinical care in the antithrombotic management of COVID-19 patients in various clinical settings. The GPS panel agreed on 17 GPS: 3 in the outpatient (pre-hospital) setting, 12 in the hospital setting both in non-critical care (ward) as well as intensive care unit settings, and 2 in the immediate post-hospital discharge setting based on limited evidence or expert opinion that supports net clinical benefit in enacting the statements provided. The antithrombotic therapies discussed in these GPS should be available in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Fibrinolytic Agents , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Hemostasis , Humans , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
13.
JAMA ; 327(13): 1247-1259, 2022 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1801957

ABSTRACT

Importance: The efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in critically ill patients with COVID-19 is uncertain. Objective: To determine whether antiplatelet therapy improves outcomes for critically ill adults with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: In an ongoing adaptive platform trial (REMAP-CAP) testing multiple interventions within multiple therapeutic domains, 1557 critically ill adult patients with COVID-19 were enrolled between October 30, 2020, and June 23, 2021, from 105 sites in 8 countries and followed up for 90 days (final follow-up date: July 26, 2021). Interventions: Patients were randomized to receive either open-label aspirin (n = 565), a P2Y12 inhibitor (n = 455), or no antiplatelet therapy (control; n = 529). Interventions were continued in the hospital for a maximum of 14 days and were in addition to anticoagulation thromboprophylaxis. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was organ support-free days (days alive and free of intensive care unit-based respiratory or cardiovascular organ support) within 21 days, ranging from -1 for any death in hospital (censored at 90 days) to 22 for survivors with no organ support. There were 13 secondary outcomes, including survival to discharge and major bleeding to 14 days. The primary analysis was a bayesian cumulative logistic model. An odds ratio (OR) greater than 1 represented improved survival, more organ support-free days, or both. Efficacy was defined as greater than 99% posterior probability of an OR greater than 1. Futility was defined as greater than 95% posterior probability of an OR less than 1.2 vs control. Intervention equivalence was defined as greater than 90% probability that the OR (compared with each other) was between 1/1.2 and 1.2 for 2 noncontrol interventions. Results: The aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitor groups met the predefined criteria for equivalence at an adaptive analysis and were statistically pooled for further analysis. Enrollment was discontinued after the prespecified criterion for futility was met for the pooled antiplatelet group compared with control. Among the 1557 critically ill patients randomized, 8 patients withdrew consent and 1549 completed the trial (median age, 57 years; 521 [33.6%] female). The median for organ support-free days was 7 (IQR, -1 to 16) in both the antiplatelet and control groups (median-adjusted OR, 1.02 [95% credible interval {CrI}, 0.86-1.23]; 95.7% posterior probability of futility). The proportions of patients surviving to hospital discharge were 71.5% (723/1011) and 67.9% (354/521) in the antiplatelet and control groups, respectively (median-adjusted OR, 1.27 [95% CrI, 0.99-1.62]; adjusted absolute difference, 5% [95% CrI, -0.2% to 9.5%]; 97% posterior probability of efficacy). Among survivors, the median for organ support-free days was 14 in both groups. Major bleeding occurred in 2.1% and 0.4% of patients in the antiplatelet and control groups (adjusted OR, 2.97 [95% CrI, 1.23-8.28]; adjusted absolute risk increase, 0.8% [95% CrI, 0.1%-2.7%]; 99.4% probability of harm). Conclusions and Relevance: Among critically ill patients with COVID-19, treatment with an antiplatelet agent, compared with no antiplatelet agent, had a low likelihood of providing improvement in the number of organ support-free days within 21 days. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02735707.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Venous Thromboembolism , Adult , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Aspirin/adverse effects , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Bayes Theorem , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
14.
Cardiovasc Hematol Agents Med Chem ; 20(3): 189-196, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775543

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Thromboembolic events are one of the important complications in COVID-19 patients, especially in severe cases. Aspirin affects platelet function by irreversibly inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity, reducing the risk of thrombosis. The current systematic review aimed to evaluate aspirin's effectiveness in preventing pro-thrombotic states in COVID-19 hospitalized patients. METHODS: The systematic search was done in PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, and Medrxiv until September 27, 2021. The following keywords were used: "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2", "2019 Novel Coronavirus", "Aspirin," and "Acetylsalicylic Acid." RESULTS: Twelve studies were included. In COVID-19 patients, aspirin can reduce CRP, IL-6 levels, and platelet aggregation by inhibiting thromboxane A2. It can also improve antiviral immunity by hindering the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and lipoxin. Eight out of twelve articles indicated that aspirin provided a beneficial effect on COVID-19. Most studies consider lowered mechanical ventilation needs, ICU admission, illness severity, overt thrombosis, and clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients receiving aspirin. CONCLUSION: Aspirin as an antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory agent may reduce the mortality rates in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19. Further observational studies are necessary to determine the effect of aspirin on the prevention of pro-thrombotic states in hospitalized COVID- 19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Lipoxins , Thrombosis , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Humans , Interleukin-6 , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases , Prostaglandins , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Thromboxane A2
15.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 79(16): 1312-1322, 2022 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774339

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Oral antiplatelet therapy is routinely used to prevent adverse cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Several laboratory tests are available to quantify the degree of platelet inhibition following antiplatelet therapy. This article aims to provide a review of the literature surrounding platelet functional testing in patients with PAD receiving oral P2Y12 inhibitors and to offer guidance to clinicians for the use and interpretation of these tests. SUMMARY: A literature search of PubMed and the Web of Science Core Collection database was conducted. All studies that performed platelet function testing and reported clinical outcomes in patients with PAD were included. Evaluation of the data suggests that, among the available testing strategies, the VerifyNow platelet reactivity unit (PRU) test is the most widely used. Despite numerous investigations attempting to define a laboratory threshold indicating suboptimal response to antiplatelet therapy, controversy exists about which PRU value best correlates with cardiovascular outcomes (ie, mortality, stent thrombosis, etc). In the PAD literature, the most commonly used PRU thresholds are 208 or higher and 235 or higher. Nonetheless, adjusting antiplatelet regimens based on suboptimal P2Y12 reactivity values has yet to be proven useful in reducing the incidence of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This review examines platelet function testing in patients with PAD and discusses the interpretation and application of these tests when monitoring the safety and efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors. CONCLUSION: Although platelet functional tests may be simple to use, clinical trials thus far have failed to show benefit from therapy adjustments based on test results. Clinicians should be cautioned against relying on this test result alone and should instead consider a combination of laboratory, clinical, and patient-specific factors when adjusting P2Y12 inhibitor therapy in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Peripheral Arterial Disease , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Blood Platelets , Clopidogrel , Humans , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Peripheral Arterial Disease/drug therapy , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Ticlopidine/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
16.
Perm J ; 252021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766163

ABSTRACT

This case report describes a successful outcome involving a patient with severe COVID-19 viral pneumonia utilizing a novel therapeutic approach with the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, eptifibatide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Eptifibatide , Humans , Peptides/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
17.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 88(6): 472-478, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754132

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Platelet activation at the early stage of COVID-19 is poorly described. The need for antiplatelet therapy in patients with COVID-19 remains controversial. We characterized the platelet activation profile in hospitalized patients at the early stage of COVID-19 using the modified prothrombinase Platelet Activation State (PAS) Assay. METHODS: Sixteen patients admitted to the emergency department of the IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy) between February 8 and April 2021 were enrolled. All patients presented with respiratory symptoms and tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Platelet activation was measured via the PAS Assay within 24 hours from patients' hospital admission. Data were compared with those measured in N.=24 healthy subjects (controls). RESULTS: Platelet activation was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients with respect to controls (PAS=0.63 [0.58-0.98%] vs. 0.46 [0.40-0.65%], respectively; P=0.03). Of note, highest PAS values were measured in the two patients with the worst clinical outcome, i.e., death because of respiratory failure (PAS=2.09% and 1.20%, respectively). No differences in standard coagulation parameters were noted between these two patients and those who were later discharged home. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of significant platelet activation state at the early stage of COVID-19 and suggests that the patient-specific platelet activation profile is a reliable clinical marker to stratify COVID-19 patients at high risk of poor clinical outcome who might potentially benefit from antiplatelet therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Humans , Platelet Activation , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 28: 10760296211073922, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COMPASS trial demonstrated that in patients with peripheral arterial disease, the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin compared with aspirin reduces the risk of major adverse limb events, but it is not known whether this combination can also improve symptoms in patients with intermittent claudication. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of the combination on claudication distance. STUDY DESIGN: Eighty-eight patients with intermittent claudication will be randomized to receive rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily or aspirin 100 mg once daily for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is the change in claudication distance from the baseline to 24 weeks, measured by 6 min walking test and treadmill test. The primary safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding according to the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis criteria. SUMMARY: The COMPASS CLAUDICATION trial will provide high-quality evidence regarding the effect of the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin on claudication distance in patients with peripheral arterial disease.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , Intermittent Claudication/drug therapy , Peripheral Arterial Disease/drug therapy , Double-Blind Method , Drug Therapy, Combination , Exercise Test , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intermittent Claudication/diagnosis , Intermittent Claudication/etiology , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Prospective Studies , Rivaroxaban/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
19.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 28: 10760296221074353, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650421

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although initial reports concentrated on severe respiratory illness, emerging literature has indicated a substantially elevated risk of thromboembolic events in patients with COVID-19 disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokine release has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and activation of coagulation pathways, as evident by elevated D-dimer levels and deranged coagulation parameters. Both macrovascular and microvascular thromboses have been described in observational cohort and post-mortem studies. Concurrently, preliminary data have suggested the role of therapeutic anticoagulation in preventing major thromboembolic complications in moderately but not critically ill patients. However, pending results from randomized controlled trials, clear guidance is lacking regarding the intensity and duration of anticoagulation in such patients. Herein, we review the existing evidence on incidence and pathophysiology of COVID-19 related thromboembolic complications and guide anticoagulation therapy based on current literature and societal consensus statements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/etiology , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , Critical Illness , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
20.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211066945, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574469

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Argatroban is licensed for patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and is conventionally monitored by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) ratio. The target range is 1.5 to 3.0 times the patients' baseline APTT and not exceeding 100 s, however this baseline is not always known. APTT is known to plateau at higher levels of argatroban, and is influenced by coagulopathies, lupus anticoagulant and raised FVIII levels. It has been used as a treatment for COVID-19 and Vaccine-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis (VITT). Some recent publications have favored the use of anti-IIa methods to determine the plasma drug concentration of argatroban. METHODS: Plasma of 60 samples from 3 COVID-19 patients and 54 samples from 5 VITT patients were tested by APTT ratio and anti-IIa method (dilute thrombin time dTT). Actin FS APTT ratios were derived from the baseline APTT of the patient and the mean normal APTT. RESULTS: Mean APTT ratio derived from baseline was 1.71 (COVID-19), 1.33 (VITT) compared to APTT ratio by mean normal 1.65 (COVID-19), 1.48 (VITT). dTT mean concentration was 0.64 µg/ml (COVID-19) 0.53 µg/ml (VITT) with poor correlations to COVID-19 baseline APTT ratio r2 = 0.1526 p <0.0001, mean normal r2 = 0.2188 p < 0.0001; VITT baseline APTT ratio r2 = 0.04 p < 0.001, VITT mean normal r2 = 0.0064 p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that dTT is a superior method to monitor the concentration of argatroban, we have demonstrated significant differences between APTT ratios and dTT levels, which could have clinical impact. This is especially so in COVID-19 and VITT.


Subject(s)
Arginine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Partial Thromboplastin Time/methods , Pipecolic Acids/therapeutic use , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombocytopenia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Aged , Arginine/pharmacology , Arginine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pipecolic Acids/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombosis/chemically induced
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