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2.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(2): 590-594, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hair-related manifestations such as alopecia areata or telogen effluvium were reported during COVID-19 disease. Accelerated hair loss with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) pattern or management has not been discussed before. AIMS: This study aimed to examine the accelerated AGA pattern hair loss and management with PRP treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was designed prospectively and nine patients included to study confirmed PCR test for COVID-19 infection. Patients underwent platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections for 4 sessions. Results were accessed with the hair pull test (HPT) and self-administered hair growth questionnaire (HGQ). RESULTS: Nine patients were admitted with complaints of hair loss after an average of 220 ± 24.2 (min: 182 max: 264) day after recovery of COVID-19. Mean age of the patients was 33.8 ±8.4 years old (min: 26, max: 52). Six (66.7%) patients were male, and three (33.3%) of them were female. HPT score decreased to 6.0 ± 1.6 after the first PRP application (p = 0.007, CI 95%:2.7-5.2) and decreased to 1.2 ± 0.8 after the last PRP session (p = 0.008, CI 95%: 6.4-11.1). Five (55.5%) of the patients described the treatment as "very effective" after treatment with HGQ. CONCLUSIONS: Accelerated hair loss associated with COVID-19 continues in long term and PRP treatment provides a satisfactory solution.


Subject(s)
Alopecia Areata , COVID-19 , Platelet-Rich Plasma , Adult , Alopecia/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
Aesthetic Plast Surg ; 45(6): 2760-2767, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has long been used for the restoration of hair in conjunction with microneedling or on its own. Fat grafting to the scalp has also been utilized in the past to improve the quality of hair and the possibility of successful hair transplant. The novel therapy reported in this case series combines the natural progression of these two techniques and utilizes synergistic effects to improve the quality of hair, either in preparation for micrografting or without hair transplant. OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate the principles behind the novel approach to restoration of hair and the rationale for its use. METHODS: A review of the evidence for PRP and fat transfer for non-scarring alopecia serves as the foundation for the combination treatment reported herein. Through presentation of three cases in this series, we provide examples of the utility of this approach for non-scarring alopecia. This report includes a female who suffered non-scarring alopecia following COVID-19 hospitalization and intensive care stay where she lost a large percentage of her hair, in addition to two male patients suffering from androgenic alopecia. RESULTS: Platelet-rich plasma-hybridized adipose transplant hair was shown in these three cases to improve both the quality and density of hair. It improved the density of hair in all patients and was characterized first by a short period of transient hair loss followed by new hair growth which develops starting at 4 weeks and was readily apparent at 12-week follow-up. Results were maintained at 6-month and 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: PHAT hair offers a combination of beneficial effects-namely the unique healing properties and growth signaling provided by PRP, along with adipocyte angiogenic and growth signaling, which both work to improve scalp quality. The combination of these effects is better than previously characterized PRP injections alone in the hands of these individual practices. This may be due to synergistic interactions at a cellular level, but additional clinical studies are needed to better understand this novel treatment and the observed effects. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE IV: This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Platelet-Rich Plasma , Adipose Tissue , Alopecia/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(4)2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085074

ABSTRACT

One of the most severe effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is lung disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. In the absence of effective treatments, it is necessary to search for new therapies and therapeutic targets. Platelets play a fundamental role in respiratory disorders resulting from viral infections, being the first line of defense against viruses and essential in maintaining lung function. The direct application of platelet lysate (PL) obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of healthy donors could help in the improvement of the patient due its anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antifibrotic, and repairing effects. This work evaluates PL nebulization by analyzing its levels of growth factors and its biological activity on lung fibroblast cell cultures, besides describing a scientific basis for its use in this kind of pathology. The data of the work suggest that the molecular levels and biological activity of the PL are maintained after nebulization. Airway administration would allow acting directly on the lung tissue modulating inflammation and stimulating reparative processes on key structures such as the alveolocapillary barrier, improving the disease and sequels. The protocol developed in this work is a first step for the study of nebulized PL both in animal experimentation and in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/therapy , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/pharmacology , Platelet-Rich Plasma , Adult , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/administration & dosage , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/immunology , Male , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Platelet-Rich Plasma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome
5.
Transfus Clin Biol ; 28(1): 55-59, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the SARS-CoV-2 virus is transmitted mainly through the respiratory tract, possible transmission by transfusion from asymptomatic carriers should be explored. As yet there are no reports of transfusion transmission of COVID-19. Haemovigilance findings within a three-month surveillance period during the new coronavirus pandemic are presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Due to great demand and shortage, blood sessions in outpatient facilities were organized during the high prevalence period of COVID-19, alongside a national plan to monitor the evolving public health situation by random molecular screening of high-risk groups of the population. Haemovigilance protocols were implemented as well as surveillance for any COVID-19 case reported post-transfusion. A 14-day quarantine and follow-up molecular and antibody testing of any COVID-19 positive case was obligatory. RESULTS: Post-donation, post-transfusion information and molecular testing of swab samples collected from three asymptomatic donors at risk for COVID-19, revealed the case of an immunosupressed patient who had been transfused with whole blood derived platelets from a donor subsequently diagnosed with COVID-19. The recipient exhibited no symptoms of the disease. Molecular and antibody testing results were negative. CONCLUSION: Haemovigilance provided information supporting the absence of transfusion transmission of COVID-19, thus strengthening the hypothesis that, even if it cannot yet be definitively ruled out, COVID-19 is not transmitted through blood transfusion. As of early June 2020, a perfect test does not exist, therefore haemovigilance along with the implementation of strict proactive measures is crucial to identify eluding asymptomatic individuals and ensure blood safety during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Transfusion/adverse effects , Blood Donors , Blood Safety , COVID-19/transmission , Donor Selection/standards , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viremia/transmission , Adult , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Contact Tracing , Female , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet-Rich Plasma , Police , Viremia/blood , Viremia/diagnosis
6.
Transfus Apher Sci ; 60(2): 103025, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943635

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic has in multiple ways affected healthcare delivery to non-COVID patients throughout the world. Adequate transfusion services are fundamental in ongoing therapy of patients with hematological ailments. We present the transfusion services in the hematology daycare under the department of Hematology and supported by the Blood Bank at our institution for the period 12th April 2020-30th June 2020, which saw the stringent lockdown and unlocking Phase I in India, declared in lieu of the pandemic. A 56 % reduction in total transfusion sessions was observed in 2020 (588 sessions given to 176 patients) compared to 1336 sessions in 516 patients over the same period in 2019. The reductions were seen across the different blood components (packed red blood cells [PRBC]: 585 vs. 1840, platelet rich plasma: 372 vs. 1313, single donor platelet 18 vs. 16), with a significant reduction in the mean PRBC transfused per PRBC transfusion session (1.11 vs 1.99, p<0.001) in 2020, compared to 2019. There were however no major differences in the transfusion practices across the different phases of the lockdown. Our study highlights the detrimental reduction in transfusion services due to the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdown and showcases the remedial strategies taken to maximize transfusion support to patients during this period. Our observations might help to provide insights to adequately combat possible similar adverse situations in the future.


Subject(s)
Blood Component Transfusion , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Platelet-Rich Plasma , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hematology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
7.
Int Wound J ; 17(6): 1863-1870, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724544

ABSTRACT

When diabetes mellitus is not properly controlled with drugs and a healthy lifestyle, it exposes patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease or critical limb ischaemia (CLI) to the most serious complications, in particular lower limb ulcers. Surgical or endovascular treatments represent the first line of intervention; in addition, the adequate management of ulcers can guarantee not only a faster wound healing but also the improvement of the patient's prognosis. To speed up this process, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and other advanced moist wound dressing have been proposed. During Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many patients with CLI and diabetes mellitus had difficult access to advanced treatments with a significant reduction in life expectancy. We report the cases of patients with non-healing ulcers and CLI treated with an empiric multistage approach after successful endovascular revascularisation; the postoperative course was eventful in all patients, and foot ulcers are currently in an advanced state of healing. The association between adequate revascularisation, systemic anti-inflammatory, and antibiotic therapy with the multistage advanced medications ensures healing of ulcers, limb salvage, and improvement of patient prognosis.


Subject(s)
Bandages , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy/methods , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Vascular Surgical Procedures/methods , Wound Healing , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Comorbidity , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Platelet-Rich Plasma , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Farm Hosp ; 44(7): 49-52, 2020 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603418

ABSTRACT

As in other areas of the health system, COVID-19 has had a dramatic impact on  hospital compounding. This area has faced numerous challenges, including the  shortage of frequent-use products (hydroalcoholic solutions, lopinavir/ritonavir  suspension), the use of new preparations for SARS-CoV-2 (tocilizumab,  remdesivir), or requests from overwhelmed wards unable to assume the safe  preparation of a high volume of medications (intravenous solutions). The  demand for all types of preparations (topic and oral medications, intravenous  solutions) has increased dramatically. This increase has highlighted the shortage of resources allocated to this area, which has made it difficult to meet the high  demand for preparations. In addition, the pandemic has revealed the scarcity of  research on such basic aspects as agent stability and drug compatibility. One of  the most relevant conclusions drawn from the COVID-19 pandemic is that the  basic areas of hospital pharmacy, along with other, must be maintained and  reinforced, as these are the areas that make us essential.


Como todo el sector sanitario, la farmacotecnia hospitalaria ha sufrido el impacto de la pandemia de la COVID-19, enfrentándose a la necesidad de cubrir el  desabastecimiento de productos de uso frecuente (soluciones hidroalcohólicas,  lopinavir/ritonavir suspensión), a nuevas preparaciones surgidas de las nuevas  necesidades provocadas por el SARS-CoV-2 (tocilizumab, remdesivir), o a  peticiones de plantas desbordadas por la carga asistencial, incapaces de asumir  con un mínimo de seguridad la preparación de numerosos medicamentos  (mezclas intravenosas). El incremento de actividad ha sido en todo tipo de  preparados (tópicos, orales y mezclas intravenosas) y ha puesto de manifiesto la escasez de recursos destinados a esta área, que se ha traducido en serios  problemas para afrontar todas las elaboraciones necesarias, así como la falta de  investigación en aspectos tan básicos como la estabilidad o la compatibilidad de  medicamentos. Probablemente, una de las conclusiones más importantes que  podemos extraer tras la COVID-19 es que ­sin menospreciar otras áreas de la  farmacia hospitalaria que también deben desarrollarse­ debemos mantener y  potenciar las áreas básicas de nuestra profesión. Aquellas que nos hacen imprescindibles.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Compounding , Pandemics , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Antiviral Agents/supply & distribution , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Component Transfusion , COVID-19 , Disinfection , Drug Administration Routes , Drug Interactions , Drug Stability , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Excipients , Forecasting , Home Care Services , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/chemistry , Infusions, Intravenous , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Platelet-Rich Plasma , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Solutions
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