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1.
J Surg Res ; 274: 213-223, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707290

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the current era of episode-based hospital reimbursements, it is important to determine the impact of hospital size on contemporary national trends in surgical technique and outcomes of lobectomy. METHODS: Patients aged >18 y undergoing open and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy from 2008 to 2014 were identified using insurance claims data from the National Inpatient Sample. The impact of hospital size on surgical approach and outcomes for both open and VATS lobectomy were analyzed. RESULTS: Over the 7-y period, 202,668 lobectomies were performed nationally, including 71,638 VATS and 131,030 open. Although the overall number of lobectomies decreased (30,058 in 2008 versus 27,340 in 2014, P < 0.01), the proportion of VATS lobectomies increased (24.0% versus 46.9%), and open lobectomies decreased (76.0% versus 53.0%, all P < 0.01). When stratified by hospital size, small hospitals had a significant increase in the proportion of open lobectomies (6.4%-12.2%; P = 0.01) and trend toward increased number of VATS lobectomies (2.7%-12.2%). Annual mortality rates for VATS (range: 1.0%-1.9%) and open (range: 1.9%-2.4%) lobectomy did not significantly differ over time (all P > 0.05) but did decrease among small hospitals (4.1%-1.3% and 5.1%-1.1% for VATS and open, respectively; both P < 0.05). After adjusting for confounders, hospital bed size was not a predictor of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of VATS lobectomies has increased over time, more so among small hospitals. Mortality rates for open lobectomy remain consistently higher than VATS lobectomy (range 0.4%-1.4%) but did not significantly differ over time. This data can help benchmark hospital performance in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy
2.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 123(2): 125-128, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643737

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, some factors have led to changes in the management of patients with lung cancer. In our study, we aimed to present our surgical treatment approach to patients with NSCLC during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients who underwent surgery for NSCLC in our thoracic surgery clinic between March 2020 and March 2021 were evaluated retrospectively. The patients operated on were retrospectively evaluated in terms of sex, age, tumor staging, lung resection type, histopathological type, COVID-19 status, length of stay, complications, and mortality. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients, 27 men and 8 women, underwent surgery for lung cancer. The 2 most common types of surgery were lobectomy (in 32 patients) and pneumonectomy (in 3 patients). According to cancer staging based on 8th TNM, 14 patients were stage 2B, 12 patients were stage 2A, and 9 patients were stage 3A. The morbidity rate was 14 %. No postoperative mortality was observed. Nine patients had a history of COVID- 19 before surgery. No significant difference was found in terms of complications in patients with a preoperative history of COVID-19. In the postoperative period, COVID-19 was observed in no patient in our clinic. CONCLUSION: We think that surgical treatments should not be postponed for diseases such as lung cancer, where the mortality rate is high and early diagnosis and treatment are very important. There will be no delay or inadequacy in the treatment of patients if the rules determined during the COVID-19 pandemic and other types of pandemic possibly occurring in the future are followed (Tab. 1, Ref. 23).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Critical Care , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 123(1): 61-65, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598390

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We report our experience in starting RATS (robotic-assisted thoracic surgery) lobectomy program during COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data from 20 consecutive cases undergoing RATS lobectomy between August 2020 and April 2021 were prospectively accumulated into our database. RESULTS: The mean operational time was 235±69 minutes (median 210, range 175 to 370). Conversion-to-open rate was 5 %. One patient was converted to an open procedure during surgery due to surgical bleeding. One patient (5 %), with sever chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), had prolonged air leak with chest drainage 11 days and conservative treatment. Morbidity rate was 10 % (2 patients). Estimated costs of RATS lobectomy in our department were $9,590 (range $8,250-$12,730). 30-days mortality was 0%. CONCLUSIONS: Safe robotic surgery is based not only on improved robotic equipment, but also on good technical skills and medical knowledge. It requires training of the entire operating room team. The learning curve is steep, involving port placement, use of the correct robotic arms, availability of the proper instrumentation, and proper patient positioning (Tab. 2, Ref. 28).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted
4.
Surg Today ; 51(3): 447-451, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453756

ABSTRACT

Accumulation of experience and advances in techniques and instruments have enabled surgeons to perform video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) safely for sublobar resection, including segmentectomy and wedge resection. A key to successful VATS sublobar resection is to have adequate resection margins and the appropriate use of articulated surgical staplers is essential for this purpose. The SigniaTM stapling system (Covidien Japan, Tokyo) has been used extensively in the fields of thoracic surgery. Its features include high maneuverability with fully powered articulation, rotation, clamping, and firing, which the surgeon can control with one hand. We introduce the "sliding technique" using the SigniaTM system, which allows for adjustment of the resection lines of the pulmonary parenchyma to optimize safe surgical margins with minimal stapler movement, and without repetitively moving the stapler in and out of the pleural cavity, during VATS sublobar resection.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Lung/surgery , Margins of Excision , Pneumonectomy/instrumentation , Pneumonectomy/methods , Surgical Staplers , Surgical Stapling/instrumentation , Surgical Stapling/methods , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/instrumentation , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Humans , Safety
5.
J Surg Oncol ; 125(2): 290-298, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The role of salvage thoracic surgery in managing advanced-stage lung cancer following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors is currently unclear. We present a series of nine patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent pulmonary resection following treatment with pembrolizumab. METHODS: We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of pulmonary resection undertaken following treatment with pembrolizumab for advanced-stage lung cancer. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: In six cases, surgery was indicated for persistent localized disease after treatment, and in three cases for nonresponsive synchronous/metachronous lung nodules while on treatment for stage IV lung cancer. Dense hilar fibrosis was present in all patients. Minimal access surgery was achieved in five cases (video-assisted n = 2, robotic-assisted n = 3). There was no in-hospital mortality. One patient died within 60 days from community-acquired COVID-19 pneumonitis. Seven patients remain free of disease between 5 and 22 months follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary resection is safe and technically feasible following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Surgical challenges relate to postimmunotherapy fibrosis, but with increased experience and a robotic approach, minimal access surgery is achievable. Further prospective studies are required to assess the surgical impact on disease control and overall survival in this patient cohort.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy , Aged , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Retrospective Studies , Salvage Therapy
7.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 113(4): e243-e245, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293575

ABSTRACT

A 65-year-old woman was diagnosed with early-stage lung cancer in 2020 and scheduled for robotic assisted-left upper lobectomy. Unfortunately, the patient contracted symptomatic COVID-19, resulting in postponement of lung resection. She was admitted for surgery 6 weeks after the acute infection. A preoperative computed tomographic scan showed widespread interstitial pneumonitis. However, the operation went ahead given concerns over tumor progression, albeit with a lesser resection to preserve lung tissue because the patient was slightly hypoxic. Her postoperative recovery was uneventful, and she was discharged 5 days later. Final histology confirmed a fully resected stage T1c N0 M0 adenocarcinoma of the lung.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Pneumonia , Adenocarcinoma/complications , Adenocarcinoma/diagnosis , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , Aged , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia/surgery
8.
Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 69(8): 1258-1260, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173992

ABSTRACT

We present two cases of lobectomy in lung cancer patients who recovered from COVID-19 before surgical treatment. In both cases, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was initiated and hilar fibrosis was detected; as a result, conversion was performed in one case. There were no postoperative complications and mortality. Also, we demonstrate the results of pathological examination in patients who have recovered from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Humans , Length of Stay , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted
9.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(3)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143073

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients are highly vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infections due to frequent contacts with the healthcare system, immunocompromised state from cancer or its therapies, supportive medications such as steroids and most importantly their advanced age and comorbidities. Patients with lung cancer have consistently been reported to suffer from an increased risk of death compared with other cancers. This is possibly due to the combination of specific pathophysiological aspects, including underlying pulmonary compromise due to smoking history and the increased specific pressures on respiratory healthcare services caused by the related pandemic. Rationally and safely treating patients with lung cancer during the pandemic has become a continuous challenge over the last year. Deciding whether to offer, modify, postpone or even cancel treatments for this particular patient's population has become the crucial recurrent dilemma for lung cancer professionals. Chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted agents represent distinct risks factors in the context of COVID-19 that should be balanced with the short-term and long-term consequences of delaying cancer care. Despite the rapid and persistent trend of the pandemic, declared by WHO on March 11, 2020, and still ongoing at the time of writing (January 2021), various efforts were made by oncologists worldwide to understand the impact of COVID-19 on patients with cancer. Adapted recommendations of our evidence-based practice guidelines have been developed for all stakeholders. Different small and large-scale registries, such as the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) and Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration quickly collected data, supporting cancer care decisions under the challenging circumstance created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several recommendations were developed as guidance for prioritizing the various aspects of lung cancer care in order to mitigate the adverse effects of the COVID-19 healthcare crisis, potentially reducing the morbidity and mortality of our patients from COVID-19 and from cancer. These recommendations helped inform decisions about treatment of established disease, continuation of clinical research and lung cancer screening. In this review, we summarize available evidence regarding the direct and indirect impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on lung cancer care and patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/physiopathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonectomy , Radiotherapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , China , Humans , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Mortality , Netherlands , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/complications , United Kingdom , United States
10.
J Surg Oncol ; 123(7): 1633-1639, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For patients with bilateral pulmonary metastases, staged resections have historically been the preferred surgical intervention. During the spring of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic made patient travel to the hospital challenging and necessitated reduction in operative volume so that resources could be conserved. We report our experience with synchronous bilateral metastasectomies for the treatment of disease in both lungs. METHODS: Patients with bilateral pulmonary metastases who underwent simultaneous bilateral resections were compared with a cohort of patients who underwent staged resections. We used nearest-neighbor propensity score (1:1) matching to adjust for confounders. Perioperative outcomes were compared between groups using paired statistical analysis techniques. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2020, 36 patients underwent bilateral simultaneous metastasectomies. We matched 31 pairs of patients. The length of stay was significantly shorter in patients undergoing simultaneous resection (median 3 vs. 8 days, p < .001) and operative time was shorter (156 vs. 235.5 min, p < .001) when compared to the sum of both procedures in the staged group. The groups did not significantly differ with regard to postoperative complications. CONCLUSION: In a carefully selected patient population, simultaneous bilateral metastasectomy is a safe option. A single procedure confers benefits for both the patient as well as the hospital resource system.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Metastasectomy/methods , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy/methods
11.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(4): e241-e243, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-956092

ABSTRACT

We report a case of necrotizing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pneumonia complicated by a bronchopleural fistula and treated by decortication and salvage lobectomy. Owing to the unknown characteristics of the underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection, treatment of the abscess and bronchopleural fistula was delayed. This may have resulted in further deterioration of the patient, with ensuing multiple organ dysfunction. Complications of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, such as a bacterial abscess and a bronchopleural fistula, should be treated as if the patient were not infected with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Bronchial Fistula/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pleural Diseases/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Adult , Bronchial Fistula/diagnosis , Bronchial Fistula/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Lung/surgery , Pleural Diseases/diagnosis , Pleural Diseases/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 33(2): 597-604, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912923

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to assess the degree of aerosolisation in different chest drainage systems according to different air leak volumes, in a simulated environment. This novel simulation model was designed to produce an air leak by passing air through and agitating a fluorescent fluid. The air leak volume and amount of fluorescent fluid were tested in various combinations and aerosolisation was assessed at 10-minute intervals using the ultraviolet light. The following chest drainage systems were compared: (1) single-chamber chest drainage system, (2) 3-compartment wet-dry suction chest drainage system, (3) digital drainage and monitoring system. The impact of suction (-2 and -4 kPa) in generating aerosolised particles was tested as well. A total number of 187 of 10-minute interval measurements were performed. The single-chamber chest drainage system generated the largest number of aerosolised particles at different air leak volumes and drainage output. The 3-compartment wet-dry suction system and the digital drainage and monitoring system did not generate any identifiable aerosolised particles at any of the air leak or drain output volumes considered. Suction applied to the chest drainage systems did not have an effect on aerosolisation. Aerosol generation in the simulated air-leak model demonstrated the potential risk of SARS-CoV-2 spread in the clinical setting. Full personal protective equipment must be used in patients with an air leak. Single-chamber chest drainage system generates the highest rate of aerosolised particles and it should not be used as an open system in patients with an air leak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Chest Tubes , Drainage , Humans , Pneumonectomy , Suction
13.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(6): 1222-1227, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910370

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in patient reluctance to seek care due to fear of contracting the virus, especially in New York City which was the epicentre during the surge. The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the safety of patients who have undergone pulmonary resection for lung cancer as well as provider safety, using COVID-19 testing, symptoms and early patient outcomes. METHODS: Patients with confirmed or suspected pulmonary malignancy who underwent resection from 13 March to 4 May 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Between 13 March and 4 May 2020, 2087 COVID-19 patients were admitted, with a median daily census of 299, to one of our Manhattan campuses (80% of hospital capacity). During this time, 21 patients (median age 72 years) out of 45 eligible surgical candidates underwent pulmonary resection-13 lobectomies, 6 segmentectomies and 2 pneumonectomies were performed by the same providers who were caring for COVID-19 patients. None of the patients developed major complications, 5 had minor complications, and the median length of hospital stay was 2 days. No previously COVID-19-negative patient (n = 20/21) or healthcare provider (n = 9: 3 surgeons, 3 surgical assistants, 3 anaesthesiologists) developed symptoms of or tested positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary resection for lung cancer is safe in selected patients, even when performed by providers who care for COVID-19 patients in a hospital with a large COVID-19 census. None of our patients or providers developed symptoms of COVID-19 and no patient experienced major morbidity or mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Adenocarcinoma/surgery , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Health Services Accessibility , Hospitalization , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Safety/statistics & numerical data , Patient Selection , Perioperative Care/methods , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
14.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(5): 1682-1688, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838056

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak was officially declared in France on March 14, 2020. The objective of this study is to report the incidence and outcome of COVID-19 after surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer in Paris Public Hospitals during the pandemic. METHODS: We retrospective analyzed a prospective database including all patients who underwent non-small cell lung cancer resection between March 14, 2020, and May 11, 2020, in the 5 thoracic surgery units of Paris Public Hospitals. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of SARS-CoV-2 infection during the first 30 days after surgery. RESULTS: Study group included 115 patients (male 57%, age 64.6 ± 10.7 years, adenocarcinoma 66%, cT1 62%, cN0 82%). During the first month after surgery, 6 patients (5%) were diagnosed with COVID-19. As compared with COVID-negative patients, COVID-positive patients were more likely to be operated on during the first month of the pandemic (100% vs 54%, P = .03) and to be on corticosteroids preoperatively (33% vs 4%, P = .03). Postoperative COVID-19 was associated with an increased rate of readmission (50% vs 5%, P = .004), but no difference in 30-day morbidity (for the study group: grade 2, 24%; grade 3, 7%; grade 4, 1%) or mortality (n = 1 COVID-negative patient, 0.9%). Immediate oncologic outcomes did not differ significantly between groups (R0 resection 99%, nodal upstaging 14%, adjuvant chemotherapy 29%). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, surgical treatment of non-small cell lung cancer was associated with a rate of postoperative COVID-19 of 5% with a significant impact on readmissions but not on other outcomes studied.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy/adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonectomy/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 69(3): 577-579, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807499

ABSTRACT

Here, we report a 54-year-old man who underwent double-sleeve left upper lobectomy for lung cancer and his postoperative course was complicated with COVID-19 pneumonia. Five days after his discharge from hospital, he was re-admitted with mild fever and bilateral multiple ground glass opacities on his chest CT. PCR testing confirmed COVID-19 infection and he was treated according to policies established by our nation's health authority. He is still receiving adjuvant chemotherapy and remains well at 3 months after the operation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
16.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(3): e183-e184, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797517

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 from infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 mount a profound inflammatory response and are predisposed to thrombotic complications. Pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare disease process resulting in pulmonary congestion, infarction, and potential mortality. This report describes a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 requiring venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for hypoxic respiratory failure who developed hemorrhagic infarction of the right lower lobe. During emergency exploration the patient was found to have a right inferior vein thrombosis and marked lobar hemorrhage mandating lobectomy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hemoptysis/surgery , Infarction/surgery , Lung/blood supply , Pneumonectomy/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hemoptysis/etiology , Humans , Infarction/etiology , Lung/surgery , Male , Pandemics
17.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(3): e181-e182, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796736

ABSTRACT

Concomitant coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is a major risk factor for complications in any type of surgical procedure, especially in thoracic surgery, were the primary organ involved, the lung, is manipulated to perform parenchymal resection. However, it is not clear whether previous infection from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may lead to increased morbidity and mortality for subsequent procedures once radiologic resolution is achieved. We report a young patient with lung cancer who successfully underwent a right upper lobectomy for primary adenocarcinoma by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with no complication in the early postoperative phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Pandemics , Postoperative Period
18.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(3): 598-604, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733389

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is currently a lack of clinical data on the novel beta-coronavirus infection [caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] and concomitant primary lung cancer. Our goal was to report our experiences with 5 patients treated for lung cancer while infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 5 adult patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted to our thoracic surgery unit between 29 January 2020 and 4 March 2020 for surgical treatment of a primary lung cancer. Clinical data and outcomes are reported. RESULTS: All patients were men with a mean age of 74.0 years (range 67-80). Four of the 5 patients (80%) reported chronic comorbidities. Surgery comprised minimally invasive lobectomy (2 patients) and segmentectomy (1 patient), lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection (1 patient) and pneumonectomy (1 patient). Mean chest drain duration was 12.4 days (range 8-22); mean hospital stay was 33.8 days (range 21-60). SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms were fever (3 patients), persistent cough (3 patients), diarrhoea (2 patients) and syncope (2 patients); 1 patient reported no symptoms. Morbidity related to surgery was 60%; 30-day mortality was 40%. Two patients (1 with a right pneumonectomy, 74 years old; 1 with a lobectomy with chest wall resection and reconstruction, 70 years old), developed SARS-CoV-2-related lung failure leading to death 60 and 32 days after surgery, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Lung cancer surgery may represent a high-risk factor for developing a severe case of coronavirus disease 2019, particularly in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. Additional strategies are needed to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection during treatment for lung cancer.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Treatment Outcome
19.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(4): 676-681, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732032

ABSTRACT

Early in 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) quickly spread globally, giving rise to a pandemic. In this critical scenario, patients with lung cancer need to continue to receive optimal care and at the same be shielded from infection with the potentially severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Upgrades to the prevention and control of infection have become paramount in order to lower the risk of hospital contagion. Aerosol-generating procedures such as endotracheal intubation or endoscopic procedures may expose health care workers to a high risk of infection. Moreover, thoracic anaesthesia usually requires highly complex airway management procedures because of the need for one-lung isolation and one-lung ventilation. Therefore, in the current pandemic, providing a fast-track algorithm for scientifically standardized diagnostic criteria and treatment recommendations for patients with lung cancer is urgent. Suggestions for improving existing contagion control guidelines are needed, even in the case of non-symptomatic patients who possibly are responsible for virus spread. A COVID-19-specific intraoperative management strategy designed to reduce risk of infection in both health care workers and patients is also required.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Airway Management/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Patient Selection , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(1): e23-e25, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628384

ABSTRACT

Emerging studies on radiologic findings in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) report a high incidence of bilateral lung involvement, with ground-glass opacities imaging being the most common pattern on computed tomography. Cystic lesions, such as pneumatoceles, are rare, although they may occur in 10% of cases. Cyst formation may be explained by a focal pulmonary trauma caused by mechanical ventilation or infection-related damage to the alveolar walls leading to pneumatoceles. The superinfection of pneumatoceles is a potential life-threatening condition for which no standardized therapeutic algorithm has been accepted. We report a case of a COVID-19 patient successfully treated by lung resections for infected pneumatoceles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Cysts/surgery , Cysts/virology , Superinfection/pathology , Superinfection/surgery , COVID-19/therapy , Cysts/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonectomy , Superinfection/etiology
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