Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 330
Filter
2.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(9): 1011-1015, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096316

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether ambient air pollutants and meteorological variables are associated with daily COVID-19 incidence. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort from January 25 to February 29, 2020. SETTING: Cities of Wuhan, Xiaogan, and Huanggang, China. PATIENTS: The COVID-19 cases detected each day. METHODS: We collected daily data of COVID-19 incidence, 8 ambient air pollutants (particulate matter of ≤2.5 µm [PM2.5], particulate matter ≤10 µm [PM10], sulfur dioxide [SO2], carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], and maximum 8-h moving average concentrations for ozone [O3-8h]) and 3 meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, and wind) in China's 3 worst COVID-19-stricken cities during the study period. The multivariate Poisson regression was performed to understand their correlation. RESULTS: Daily COVID-19 incidence was positively associated with PM2.5 and humidity in all cities. Specifically, the relative risk (RR) of PM2.5 for daily COVID-19 incidences were 1.036 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.032-1.039) in Wuhan, 1.059 (95% CI, 1.046-1.072) in Xiaogan, and 1.144 (95% CI, 1.12-1.169) in Huanggang. The RR of humidity for daily COVID-19 incidence was consistently lower than that of PM2.5, and this difference ranged from 0.027 to 0.111. Moreover, PM10 and temperature also exhibited a notable correlation with daily COVID-19 incidence, but in a negative pattern The RR of PM10 for daily COVID-19 incidence ranged from 0.915 (95% CI, 0.896-0.934) to 0.961 (95% CI, 0.95-0.972, while that of temperature ranged from 0.738 (95% CI, 0.717-0.759) to 0.969 (95% CI, 0.966-0.973). CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that PM2.5 and humidity are substantially associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 and that PM10 and temperature are substantially associated with a decreased risk of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants/toxicity , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Weather , Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution/analysis , Air Pollution/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Poisson Distribution , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Bioessays ; 42(10): e2000091, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074923

ABSTRACT

Despite claims from prominent scientists that SARS-CoV-2 indubitably emerged naturally, the etiology of this novel coronavirus remains a pressing and open question: Without knowing the true nature of a disease, it is impossible for clinicians to appropriately shape their care, for policy-makers to correctly gauge the nature and extent of the threat, and for the public to appropriately modify their behavior. Unless the intermediate host necessary for completing a natural zoonotic jump is identified, the dual-use gain-of-function research practice of viral serial passage should be considered a viable route by which the novel coronavirus arose. The practice of serial passage mimics a natural zoonotic jump, and offers explanations for SARS-CoV-2's distinctive spike-protein region and its unexpectedly high affinity for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE2), as well as the notable polybasic furin cleavage site within it. Additional molecular clues raise further questions, all of which warrant full investigation into the novel coronavirus's origins and a re-examination of the risks and rewards of dual-use gain-of-function research.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Zoonoses/transmission , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , Betacoronavirus/growth & development , COVID-19 , Gain of Function Mutation/genetics , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2 , Serial Passage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Zoonoses/virology
5.
Cien Saude Colet ; 25(suppl 1): 2469-2477, 2020 Jun.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725054

ABSTRACT

This paper aims to perform a theoretical reflection on the historical-social foundations of the COVID-19 pandemic. The "capital worldization", "capital-imperialism", "space-time compression", and "structural crisis of capital" categories are conjured from the historical materialistic-theoretical matrix, outlining a course that transcends the limits of Health Sciences to understand global health, of which the COVID-19 pandemic is an expression. We then return to the field of health, when the category of "social determination of health" allows elucidating the bases of the pandemic studied. We show that, other elements typical of the current phase of contemporary capitalism have become universal besides the SARS-CoV-2 characteristics or the dynamics of the rapid movement of people and objects around the world, unifying the health social determination process.


Este artigo possui o objetivo de realizar uma reflexão teórica sobre os fundamentos histórico-sociais da pandemia de COVID-19. A partir da matriz teórica materialista histórica, evoca-se as categorias da "mundialização do capital", "capital-imperialismo", "compressão espaço-tempo" e "crise estrutural do capital" traçando um percurso que ultrapassa os limites das Ciências da Saúde a fim de entender a saúde global, da qual a pandemia de COVID-19 é expressão. Posteriormente, faz-se o retorno ao campo da saúde, quando a categoria da "determinação social da saúde" permite elucidar as bases da pandemia estudada. Demonstra-se que, para além das características próprias do SARS-CoV-2 ou da dinâmica de rápido trânsito de pessoas e objetos pelo mundo, há outros elementos típicos da atual fase do capitalismo contemporâneo que se tornaram universais, unificando o processo de determinação social da saúde.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Capitalism , Coronavirus Infections , Global Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Determinants of Health , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Global Health/economics , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health/economics , Time Factors
6.
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol ; 59(2): 202-208, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In addition to the lungs, the placenta and the endothelium can be affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and placental growth factor (PlGF) are markers of endothelial dysfunction and could potentially serve as predictors of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to investigate the association of serum concentrations of sFlt-1 and PlGF with the severity of COVID-19 in pregnancy. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City, Mexico. Symptomatic pregnant women with a positive reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV-2 infection who fulfilled the criteria for hospitalization were included. The primary outcome was severe pneumonia due to COVID-19. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit (ICU) admission, viral sepsis and maternal death. sFlt-1 levels were expressed as multiples of the median (MoM). The association between sFlt-1 and each adverse outcome was explored by logistic regression analysis, adjusted for gestational age for outcomes occurring in more than five patients, and the predictive performance was assessed by receiver-operating-characteristics-curve analysis. RESULTS: Among 113 pregnant women with COVID-19, higher sFlt-1 MoM was associated with an increased probability of severe pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.817 (95% CI, 1.365-2.418)), ICU admission (aOR, 2.195 (95% CI, 1.582-3.047)), viral sepsis (aOR, 2.318 (95% CI, 1.407-3.820)) and maternal death (unadjusted OR, 5.504 (95% CI, 1.079-28.076)). At a 10% false-positive rate, sFlt-1 MoM had detection rates of 45.2%, 66.7%, 83.3% and 100% for severe COVID-19 pneumonia, ICU admission, viral sepsis and maternal death, respectively. PlGF values were similar between women with severe and those with non-severe COVID-19 pneumonia. CONCLUSION: sFlt-1 MoM is higher in pregnant women with severe COVID-19 and has the capability to predict serious adverse pregnancy events, such as severe pneumonia, ICU admission, viral sepsis and maternal death. © 2021 International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/blood , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Mortality , Placenta/metabolism , Placenta/physiopathology , Placenta Growth Factor/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(21): 23895-23912, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498164

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is presently the most pressing public health concern worldwide. Cytokine storm is an important factor leading to death of patients with COVID-19. This study aims to characterize serum cytokines of patients with severe or critical COVID-19. Clinical records were obtained from 149 patients who were tested at the Sino-French New City Branch of Tongji Hospital from 30 January to 30 March 2020. Data regarding the clinical features of the patients was collected and analyzed. Among the 149, 45 (30.2%) of them had severe conditions and 104 (69.8%) of that presented critical symptoms. In the meantime, 80 (53.7%) of that 149 died during hospitalization. Of all, male patients accounted for 94 (69.1%). Compared with patients in severe COVID-19, those who in critical COVID-19 had significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-10. Moreover, the passed-away patients had considerably higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 than those survived from it. Regression analysis revealed that serum TNF-α level was an independent risk factor for the death of patient with severe conditions. Among the proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6) analyzed herein, TNF-α was seen as a risk factor for the death of patients with severe or critical COVID-19. This study suggests that anti-TNF-α treatment allows patients with severe or critical COVID-19 pneumonia to recover.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Interleukins/blood , Pneumonia, Viral , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/therapeutic use
10.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390784

ABSTRACT

Respiratory tract infections constitute a significant public health problem, with a therapeutic arsenal that remains relatively limited and that is threatened by the emergence of antiviral and/or antibiotic resistance. Viral-bacterial co-infections are very often associated with the severity of these respiratory infections and have been explored mainly in the context of bacterial superinfections following primary influenza infection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these co-infections between respiratory viruses (influenza viruses, RSV, and SARS-CoV-2) and bacteria, at both the physiological and immunological levels. This review also explores the importance of the microbiome and the pathological context in the evolution of these respiratory tract co-infections and presents the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models available. A better understanding of the complex functional interactions between viruses/bacteria and host cells will allow the development of new, specific, and more effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.


Subject(s)
Coinfection , Pneumonia, Bacterial/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Microbiota , Pneumonia, Bacterial/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Superinfection
12.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 587, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused ongoing challenges in health services worldwide. Despite the growing body of literature on COVID-19, reports on perinatal care in COVID-19 cases are limited. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a 36-year-old G5/P2 pregnant woman with morbid obesity, confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, and fulminant respiratory failure. At 28+ 1 gestational weeks, the patient delivered an uninfected newborn. Using ImmunoCAP ISAC® technology, we found no immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies, suggesting that no mother-to-child viral transmission occurred during pregnancy or delivery. The maternal respiratory state improved rapidly after delivery; both maternal and neonatal outcomes were encouraging given the early gestational age and fulminant course of respiratory failure in our patient. CONCLUSIONS: The management of ARDS in pregnant women with COVID-19 is complex and requires an individualized, multidisciplinary approach, while considering maternal and fetal outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cesarean Section/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Fetal Monitoring/methods , Gestational Age , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Obesity, Morbid/physiopathology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Perinatal Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/etiology , Premature Birth/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
13.
Adv Genet ; 106: 75-100, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363831

ABSTRACT

The origins and global spread of two recent, yet quite different, pandemic diseases is discussed and reviewed in depth: Candida auris, a eukaryotic fungal disease, and COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), a positive strand RNA viral respiratory disease. Both these diseases display highly distinctive patterns of sudden emergence and global spread, which are not easy to understand by conventional epidemiological analysis based on simple infection-driven human- to-human spread of an infectious disease (assumed to jump suddenly and thus genetically, from an animal reservoir). Both these enigmatic diseases make sense however under a Panspermia in-fall model and the evidence consistent with such a model is critically reviewed.


Subject(s)
Biological Evolution , Candidiasis/etiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Origin of Life , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Candida/isolation & purification , Candida/physiology , Candidiasis/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Earth, Planet , Exobiology , Extraterrestrial Environment , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 267, 2021 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362053

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is to estimate the prevalence of atelectasis assessed with computer tomography (CT) in SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and the relationship between the amount of atelectasis with oxygenation impairment, Intensive Care Unit admission rate and the length of in-hospital stay. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two-hundred thirty-seven patients admitted to the hospital with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia diagnosed by clinical, radiology and molecular tests in the nasopharyngeal swab who underwent a chest computed tomography because of a respiratory worsening from Apr 1 to Apr 30, 2020 were included in the study. Patients were divided into three groups depending on the presence and amount of atelectasis at the computed tomography: no atelectasis, small atelectasis (< 5% of the estimated lung volume) or large atelectasis (> 5% of the estimated lung volume). In all patients, clinical severity, oxygen-therapy need, Intensive Care Unit admission rate, the length of in-hospital stay and in-hospital mortality data were collected. RESULTS: Thirty patients (19%) showed small atelectasis while eight patients (5%) showed large atelectasis. One hundred and seventeen patients (76%) did not show atelectasis. Patients with large atelectasis compared to patients with small atelectasis had lower SatO2/FiO2 (182 vs 411 respectively, p = 0.01), needed more days of oxygen therapy (20 vs 5 days respectively, p = 0,02), more frequently Intensive Care Unit admission (75% vs 7% respectively, p < 0.01) and a longer period of hospitalization (40 vs 14 days respectively p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: In patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, atelectasis might appear in up to 24% of patients and the presence of larger amount of atelectasis is associated with worse oxygenation and clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypoxia , Pneumonia, Viral , Pulmonary Atelectasis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Volume Measurements/methods , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prevalence , Pulmonary Atelectasis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Atelectasis/epidemiology , Pulmonary Atelectasis/etiology , Pulmonary Atelectasis/physiopathology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Spain/epidemiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data
15.
Microb Biotechnol ; 13(5): 1289-1299, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352399

ABSTRACT

The number of people infected with SARS-CoV-2, and sadly dying from COVID-19, has exploded, and so the amount of literature on the novel coronavirus and the disease it causes has increased proportionately. The case numbers in some countries are beyond the epidemic peak, but the uncertainty about a second wave keeps politicians and societies under pressure. Appropriate decision-making and winning support from the population depends on precise scientific information rather than leaving the field to scaremongers of all proveniences. This mini-review is an update of earlier reports (Brüssow, Microb Biotechnol 2020a;13:607; Brüssow, Microb Biotechnol 2020b; https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.13592).


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Tropism
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(29): e26533, 2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331614

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, keeps spreading globally. Evidence suggests that a subgroup of patients with severe symptomatology might have cytokine storms, which increases mortality. The use of interleukin-6 (IL-6) inhibitors may help in controlling the pathological immune response to the virus. Tocilizumab, a monoclonal antibody against IL-6, stands as an optional treatment for COVID-19 patients presenting this inflammatory hyper-response.We conducted a retrospective, observational, cohort study including 50 patients affected by COVID-19 with severe pneumonia and poor prognosis criteria, who have also undergone standard treatment; 36 of these patients additionally received tocilizumab in an early stage. The need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mortality, recovery of respiratory function, and improvement of biochemical and hematological parameters were compared between cohorts.Most patients were men, non-smokers and the most frequently reported comorbidities were hypertension and diabetes. Recurrent symptoms were fever, cough, and dyspnoea. 54.8% of patients from the tocilizumab group needed intubation, while in the control group 85.7% needed it. Treatment with tocilizumab significatively increased IL-6 levels, (554.45; CI 95% 186.69, 1032.93; P < .05) while C-reactive protein mean levels were reduced (-108.19; CI 95% -140.15, -75.33; P < .05), but no significant difference was found between cohorts. In comparison with the controls, tocilizumab reduced mortality (25.0% vs 42.9%, P = .021) and the number of ICU admissions (63.9% vs 100.0%, P = .021). 44.1% of patients treated with tocilizumab showed favorable radiological evolution, when compared with 15.4% of patients from the control group.Tocilizumab may improve clinical symptoms and mitigate deterioration observed in severe COVID-19 patients, and could be considered as an effective therapeutic option in subjects experiencing a significant inflammatory response to the disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
17.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311200

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is among the most important public health crises of our generation. Despite the promise of prevention offered by effective vaccines, patients with severe COVID-19 will continue to populate hospitals and intensive care units for the foreseeable future. The most common clinical presentation of severe COVID-19 is hypoxemia and respiratory failure, typical of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Whether the clinical features and pathobiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pneumonia differ from those of pneumonia secondary to other pathogens is unclear. This uncertainty has created variability in the application of historically proven therapies for ARDS to patients with COVID-19. We review the available literature and find many similarities between patients with ARDS from pneumonia attributable to SARS-CoV-2 versus other respiratory pathogens. A notable exception is the long duration of illness among patients with COVID-19, which could result from its unique pathobiology. Available data support the use of care pathways and therapies proven effective for patients with ARDS, while pointing to unique features that might be therapeutically targeted for patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Autopsy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Humans , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/virology , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Receptors, Virus/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
18.
Pharmacol Res ; 159: 104946, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279674

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has sparked a global pandemic, affecting more than 4 million people worldwide. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can cause acute lung injury (ALI) and even acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); with a fatality of 7.0 %. Accumulating evidence suggested that the progression of COVID-19 is associated with lymphopenia and excessive inflammation, and a subset of severe cases might exhibit cytokine storm triggered by secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH). Furthermore, secondary bacterial infection may contribute to the exacerbation of COVID-19. We recommend using both IL-10 and IL-6 as the indicators of cytokine storm, and monitoring the elevation of procalcitonin (PCT) as an alert for initiating antibacterial agents. Understanding the dynamic progression of SARS-CoV-2 infection is crucial to determine an effective treatment strategy to reduce the rising mortality of this global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Progression , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Lymphopenia/etiology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Respir Med ; 186: 106516, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275693

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is transmitted through respiratory droplets, aerosols and close contact. Cross infections occur because viruses spread rapidly among humans. Nineteen percent (19%) of the infected patients developed severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Hypoxemia usually occurs and patients may require oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilation (MV) support. In this article, recently published clinical experience and observational studies were reviewed. Corresponding respiratory therapy regarding different stages of infection is proposed. Infection control principles and respiratory strategies including oxygen therapy, non-invasive respiratory support (NIRS), intubation evaluation, equipment preparation, ventilator settings, special maneuvers comprise of the prone position (PP), recruitment maneuver (RM), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), weaning and extubation are summarized. Respiratory equipment and device disinfection recommendations are worked up. We expect this review article could be used as a reference by healthcare workers in patient care while minimizing the risk of environmental contamination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Infection Control/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Respiration, Artificial/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/transmission , Cannula , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross Infection/transmission , Cross Infection/virology , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
20.
Clin Transl Gastroenterol ; 12(6): e00348, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259760

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia display enhanced levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) compared with controls, suggesting that low-grade endotoxemia may be implicated in vascular disturbances. It is unknown whether this occurs in patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) and its impact on thrombotic complications. METHODS: We measured serum levels of zonulin, a marker of gut permeability, LPS, and D-dimer in 81 patients with COVID-19 and 81 healthy subjects; the occurrence of thrombotic events in COVID-19 during the intrahospital stay was registered. RESULTS: Serum LPS and zonulin were higher in patients with COVID-19 than in control subjects and, in COVID-19, significantly correlated (R = 0.513; P < 0.001). Among the 81 patients with COVID-19, 11 (14%) experienced thrombotic events in the arterial (n = 5) and venous circulation (n = 6) during a median follow-up of 18 days (interquartile range 11-27 days). A logistic regression analysis showed that LPS (P = 0.024) and D-dimer (P = 0.041) independently predicted thrombotic events. DISCUSSION: The study reports that low-grade endotoxemia is detectable in patients with COVID-19 and is associated with thrombotic events. The coexistence of low-grade endotoxemia with enhanced levels of zonulin may suggest enhanced gut permeability as an underlying mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endotoxemia , Haptoglobins/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa , Protein Precursors/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Correlation of Data , Endotoxemia/diagnosis , Endotoxemia/metabolism , Endotoxemia/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Lipopolysaccharides/analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Permeability , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL