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1.
Psychiatr Prax ; 47(6): 308-318, 2020 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657524

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of the Corona pandemic and related restrictions on going out on social participation, social inclusion and well-being in adults with and without current or chronic mental health problems METHODS: Follow-up survey (n = 132) using the Measure of Participation and Social Inclusion for Use in People with a Chronic Mental Disorder (F-INK), the Index for the Assessment of Health Impairments (IMET), and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18). RESULTS: The impact on social participation capabilities and social participation differed depending on the participants' mental health status at the first assessment. Independent of this, we found no detrimental effect on the mental health status four weeks after the enactment of restrictions on going-out. CONCLUSION: Findings imply a general resilience in well-being in the preliminary stages of the Corona pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Social Participation , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Follow-Up Studies , Germany , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Resilience, Psychological
4.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 7(9): 813-824, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-652455

ABSTRACT

The unpredictability and uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic; the associated lockdowns, physical distancing, and other containment strategies; and the resulting economic breakdown could increase the risk of mental health problems and exacerbate health inequalities. Preliminary findings suggest adverse mental health effects in previously healthy people and especially in people with pre-existing mental health disorders. Despite the heterogeneity of worldwide health systems, efforts have been made to adapt the delivery of mental health care to the demands of COVID-19. Mental health concerns have been addressed via the public mental health response and by adapting mental health services, mostly focusing on infection control, modifying access to diagnosis and treatment, ensuring continuity of care for mental health service users, and paying attention to new cases of mental ill health and populations at high risk of mental health problems. Sustainable adaptations of delivery systems for mental health care should be developed by experts, clinicians, and service users, and should be specifically designed to mitigate disparities in health-care provision. Thorough and continuous assessment of health and service-use outcomes in mental health clinical practice will be crucial for defining which practices should be further developed and which discontinued. For this Position Paper, an international group of clinicians, mental health experts, and users of mental health services has come together to reflect on the challenges for mental health that COVID-19 poses. The interconnectedness of the world made society vulnerable to this infection, but it also provides the infrastructure to address previous system failings by disseminating good practices that can result in sustained, efficient, and equitable delivery of mental health-care delivery. Thus, the COVID-19 pandemic could be an opportunity to improve mental health services.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Mental Disorders/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology
5.
ACS Chem Neurosci ; 11(15): 2145-2148, 2020 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646274

ABSTRACT

Studies have shown that the calcium ion (Ca2+) plays important roles both in Alzheimer's dementia and SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion to host cell entry. An elevated level of intracellular calcium causes neuronal dysfunction, cell death, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of calcium has also been shown to increase the production of amyloid beta (Aß) protein, the hallmark of Alzheimer's dementia. Reversely, deposition of Aß is also responsible for calcium dysregulation. On the other hand, it has been well investigated that viruses can disturb host cell Ca2+ homeostasis as well as modulate signal transduction mechanisms. Viruses can also hijack the host cell calcium channels and pumps to release more intracellular Ca2+ to utilize for their life cycle. Even though evidence has not been reported on SARS-CoV-2 concerning Ca2+ regulation, however, it has been well established that Ca2+ is essential for viral entry, viral gene replication, and virion maturation and release. Recent reports suggest that SARS-CoV needs two Ca2+ ions to fuse with the host cell at the entry step. Furthermore, some calcium channel blockers (CCBs), such as nimodipine, memantine, etc., have been reported to be effective in the treatment of dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as have shown inhibition in various virus infections.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy , Betacoronavirus , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Alzheimer Disease/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Calcium/metabolism , Calcium Channel Blockers/chemistry , Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology , Calcium Channels/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Treatment Outcome
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 206, 2020 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617318

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) global pandemic has resulted in unprecedented public health measures. This has impacted the UK education sector with many universities halting campus-based teaching and examinations. The aim of this study is to identify the impact of COVID-19 on final year medical students' examinations and placements in the United Kingdom (UK) and how it might impact their confidence and preparedness going into their first year of foundation training. METHODS: A 10-item online survey was distributed to final year medical students across 33 UK medical schools. The survey was designed by combining dichotomous, multiple choice and likert response scale questions. Participants were asked about the effect that the COVID-19 global pandemic had on final year medical written exams, electives, assistantships and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs). The survey also explored the student's confidence and preparedness going into their first year of training under these new unprecedented circumstances. RESULTS: Four hundred forty students from 32 UK medical schools responded. 38.4% (n = 169) of respondents had their final OSCEs cancelled while 43.0% (n = 189) had already completed their final OSCEs before restrictions. 43.0% (n = 189) of assistantship placements were postponed while 77.3% (n = 340) had electives cancelled. The impact of COVID-19 on OSCEs, written examinations and student assistantships significantly affected students' preparedness (respectively p = 0.025, 0.008, 0.0005). In contrast, when measuring confidence, only changes to student assistantships had a significant effect (p = 0.0005). The majority of students feel that measures taken during this pandemic to amend their curricula was necessary. Respondents also agree that assisting in hospitals during the outbreak would be a valuable learning opportunity. CONCLUSIONS: The impact on medical student education has been significant, particularly affecting the transition from student to doctor. This study showed the disruptions to student assistantships had the biggest effect on students' confidence and preparedness. For those willing to assist in hospitals to join the front-line workforce, it is crucial to maintain their wellbeing with safeguards such as proper inductions, support and supervision.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Young Adult
7.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(6): 374-378, 2020 06.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-768980

ABSTRACT

Bergamo is a rich and populous city of northern Italy and one of the epicentres of the worldwide pandemic CoViD-19. Despite the generosity of health workers, we are undergoing a severe humanitarian crisis that is stressing every aspect of daily life. From outside it is very hard to understand, because houses are closed for lockdown and are not destroyed as they would be in an earthquake. An outbreak is not "only" a sudden mass lethal incident, like a natural disaster, neither "only" a disease, to be treated by doctors, but a social phenomenon too. Historical and social elements are key factors for development (for example, intensive promiscuity between animals and humans) and spread of an epidemic (for example, health workers and ambulance rapidly become vector of the virus). Can medical responsibility change in times of pandemic? My answer, as anaesthetist and intensive care physician from Bergamo, is yes. When the global medical community is called on to face a pandemic of unprecedented scale, with little scientific evidence and "crazy numbers" describing the situation, honest and forthcoming advocacy is an ethical duty. Aim of this narrative report is to share a view point about the dilemma of moral responsibility.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology
8.
Age Ageing ; 49(5): 696-700, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759920

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the response to the pandemic are combining to produce a tidal wave of need for rehabilitation. Rehabilitation will be needed for survivors of COVID-19, many of whom are older, with underlying health problems. In addition, rehabilitation will be needed for those who have become deconditioned as a result of movement restrictions, social isolation, and inability to access healthcare for pre-existing or new non-COVID-19 illnesses. Delivering rehabilitation in the same way as before the pandemic will not be practical, nor will this approach meet the likely scale of need for rehabilitation. This commentary reviews the likely rehabilitation needs of older people both with and without COVID-19 and discusses how strategies to deliver effective rehabilitation at scale can be designed and implemented in a world living with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Aging , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Rehabilitation , Aged , Aging/physiology , Aging/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/rehabilitation , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Forecasting , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Physical Functional Performance , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/organization & administration , Rehabilitation/trends
11.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 28: e3361, 2020 Sep 07.
Article in English, Spanish, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750916

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: amidst the greatest health crisis in history triggered by COVID-19, this documental study was intended to understand the meanings individuals who have lost loved ones in this context assign to the phenomenon of suppressed funeral rituals. METHOD: based on the theory of grief, the corpus of this study was composed of documents published in digital media containing personal writings and reports of experiences freely and easily available to the public. Two researchers with expertise in the field used inductive thematic analysis to interpret data. RESULTS: the experiences shared in the reports reflect the suffering experienced by the sudden death of a significant person, which is amplified by the absence or impediment to performing familial farewell rituals. The suppression or abbreviation of funeral rituals is a traumatic experience because family members are prevented from fulfilling their last homage to the loved one who has suddenly passed away, causing feelings of disbelief and indignation. CONCLUSION: alternatives and new ways to celebrate passage rituals in emergencies of strong social commotion such as a pandemic are needed to provide support and comfort to family members, friends, and relatives. These rituals help survivors to overcome the critical moment, decreasing the risk of developing complicated grief.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Funeral Rites , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Internet , Pandemics
13.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 649-656, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand medical students' mental health, professional pride, and intention to work in the front-line during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and provide a reference for psychological intervention. METHODS: We used the depression-anxiety-stress scale and self-designed questionnaire on professional pride, intention to work in the front-line and the extent of family support. Medical students from 4 medical schools in Fujian and Hunan were investigated. Their mental health status, professional pride and first-line work willingness with different characteristics were compared, and the influential factors for professional pride and first-line work willingness were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 266 valid questionnaires were collected. During the pandemic, there were significant differences in the proportion of depressed students among different college and universities, majors and stages (P<0.05), and the professional pride was significantly different (P<0.001). Medical students with different mental health status showed significant differences in professional pride (P<0.01). Marriage, pressure and extent of family support were the influential factors for their professional pride (P<0.05). The latter two were also influential factors for their intention to work in the front-line (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, students from college and nursing have relatively better mental health and higher professional pride. The professional pride is low in medical students who married, with abnormal stress or low family support. The intention to work in front-line is decreased in students with abnormal stress or low family support.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Betacoronavirus , China , Family , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Professionalism , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 657-664, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745335

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) brought psychological stress to the public, especially to patients. This study aims to investigate the mental health of patients with COVID-19 in Changsha. METHODS: We took cross-section investigation for the mental health of 112 patients with COVID-19 via questionnaires. Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test were performed to compare general and clinical data between the slight-ordinary patients and severe patients. Single sample t-tests were used to compare the difference between the factor scores of the Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90) in COVID-19 patients with the norm of 2015 and factor scores of SCL-90 in patients with the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). RESULTS: The obsessive-compulsive, depression, sleep and eating disorders had the highest frequency among the positive symptoms of SCL-90 in patients with COVID-19 in Changsha. The factor scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, phobia anxiety, sleep and eating disorders in patients with COVID-19 were higher than those of the norm (P≤0.001 or P<0.05). Slight-ordinary patients with COVID-19 in Changsha showed lower factor scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility compared with the patients with SARS (P<0.001 or P<0.05). There was no difference in factor scores of SCL-90 between the patients with severe COVID-19 and those with SARS(P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The levels of somatization, depression, anxiety, phobia anxiety, sleep and eating disorders in patients with COVID-19 in Changsha are higher than those of the norm. However, the mental health of slight-ordinary patients with COVID-19 is better than that of patients with SARS. It needs to provide targeting psychological interventions depending on the severity of patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Status , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , China , Depression , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 627-632, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745330

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the attitudes and skills of grief counseling in the front-line medical workers from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) designated hospitals in Wuhan for the bereaved family members and to provide the basis for proper hospital management strategies. METHODS: The convenience sampling method was applied to select 422 medical workers who kept touch with the bereaved family members in five COVID-19 designated hospitals in Wuhan from January to February 2020. Questionnaire regarding grief counseling attitudes and questionnaire regarding grief counseling skills were used to evaluate the attitudes and skills of grief counseling in medical workers. The scores of grief counseling attitudes and skills in group of different characteristics were further compared. Pearson correlation was used to analyze the attitudes and skills of grief counseling in medical workers. RESULTS: The scores of grief counseling attitudes in medical workers were 15-46 (33.00±9.31). Length of service, professional title, whether or not receiving relevant training, frequency of contact with bereaved family members contributed to impacting the medical workers' attitudes of grief counseling (all P<0.05). The scores of grief counseling skills in medical workers were 9-30 (19.30±4.42). Length of service, professional title, religion, whether or not receiving relevant training, frequency of contact with bereaved family members contributed to impacting the medical workers' skills of grief counseling (all P<0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the attitudes and skills of grief counseling in the medical workers (r=0.608, P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The attitudes and skills of grief counseling in the medical workers from COVID-19 designated hospitals in Wuhan still need to be improved. Grief counseling group and a long-term, comprehensive training system are recommended.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Counseling , Grief , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , China , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics
16.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 665-672, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745326

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate residents' knowledge, attitude and behavior towards coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hunan Province, and to explore the factors influencing behaviors. METHODS: A self-designed questionnaire was used to conduct an online survey for 4 139 Hunan residents. The contents included general population information, residents' knowledge, attitude and practice to COVID-19. RESULTS: Mean scores of knowledge, attitude, and behavior were 29.82±3.16, 6.71±1.12, and 14.93±1.45, respectively. Residents had the highest score of major symptoms of COVID-19 (3.96±0.39), but the lowest was the main transmission routes (3.47±0.89). A total of 22.68% of the residents were very or relatively afraid of the outbreak, but 95.22% of the residents had confidence in defeating COVID-19. In behavior dimension, "handling of suspicious symptoms" had the lowest score (3.58±0.75). The behavior implementation rate of "keep the surfaces of household items clean" (80.50%), "doing more exercise, reasonable diet, working and resting regularly" (84.59%), and "avoid hand contacting with eyes, mouth or nose" (89.51%) were relatively low. Pearson correlation coefficient showed that the knowledge, attitude, and practices score were correlated with each other (knowledge vs behavior: r=0.366; knowledge vs attitude: r=0.041; attitude vs behavior: r=0.100; all P<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the knowledge, attitude and behavior on COVID-19 were mostly influenced by education background (all P<0.05), and the independent factors affecting behavior included knowledge and attitude, gender, permanent residence, education background (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Residents in Hunan Province have a good knowledge, attitude, and behavior to COVID-19. Nevertheless there are still weak links to be improved in all dimensions. It is necessary to strengthen knowledge and behavior of family protection, and care for residents' psychological health, especially persons with low education degree, male and rural residents.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , China , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 620-626, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745323

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the insomnia status and relevant factors for the medical staff in the medical aid team for Hubei Province during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: A convenient sampling survey was conducted among 1 056 medical staff in the national medical team of Hubei Province by using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and the Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RES). RESULTS: The incidence from moderate to severe insomnia was 35.14%, and the total self-efficacy of emotion regulation was 3.60±0.91. Univariate analysis showed that the incidence of insomnia in female medical workers in Hubei Province was higher than that of male medical workers, which was increased with the elongation of work time and frequency. In addition, insomnia was associated with age, perceived ambient exposure and infection, and RES scores. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the occurrence of insomnia was mainly related to gender, perceived peripheral exposure, infection, and RES scores. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia is very common among medical workers in Hubei Province during the COVID-19 epidemic. Insomnia is related to the medical work status, the gender and their own emotional management and regulation in the epidemic area.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Betacoronavirus , China , Emotional Regulation , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Sex Factors
18.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 613-619, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745322

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a global public health crisis, which elicits psychological problems in different population. This study is to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on mental health in the front-line staff. METHODS: Patient Health Questionnare-9 (PHQ-9), Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and Fatigue Self-assessment Scale (FSAS) were used to assess the depression, anxiety, and fatigue in front-line staff. RESULTS: The detection rates of depression, anxiety, and fatigue were 49.1%, 21.8%, and 76.0% among the front-line staff. The rates of depression, anxiety, and fatigue in community workers were higher than those in medical workers and other occupational staff (P<0.01). The PHQ-9 of front-line staffs was negatively correlated with age, family income, family members' support, satisfaction of service objects, and sleep quality (all P<0.01), while positively correlated with education level, fatigue, fear of pneumonia, and the duration of daily attention to the COVID-19 (all P<0.01). SAS was negatively correlated with age, family income, family support, satisfaction of objects service, and sleep quality (all P<0.01), while positively correlated with gender, fatigue, fear of pneumonia, and duration of daily attention to the COVID-19 (all P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The front-line workers should manage work and rest time reasonably to adjust their negative mood and fatigue. The government and the society should pay more attention to the psychological state of the front-line staff, particularly for the staff working in the community or villages and towns in preventing the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, front-line staff can be obtained mental intervention or be taken a rest from the high-intensive work.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Depression/diagnosis , Fatigue/diagnosis , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control
19.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 641-648, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745314

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand the psychological status of the staff in a general hospital during the coronavirus disease 2019 and its influential factors, and to provide references for the mental health services to hospital staff. METHODS: Using star platform of questionnaire, the staff in the general hospital were investigated via Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS-21), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). The influential factors were discussed by descriptive analysis, rank sum test, single factor analysis, correlation analysis and multiple factors binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 2 060 valid questionnaires were collected. The negative emotions of nurses and cleaners were the most obvious. The depression scores, anxiety scores and stress scores for nurses and cleaners were 5.06±7.47, 6.36±7.84, 9.75±8.65, and 6.72±8.84, 4.51±6.56, 9.69±9.56, respectively. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis showed that staff types, education levels, job status, economic situation and concerns on the supplies of protective goods were the main influential factors for depression; staff types, contacting status with infected patients, economic situation, concerns on the supplies of protective goods, history of disease were the main influential factors for anxiety; contacting status with infected patients, economic situation, concerns on the supplies of protective goods were the main influential factors for stress. CONCLUSIONS: There are differences in psychological characteristics among different groups of staff in the general hospital under the outbreak. Thus psychological protection and intervention measures should be formulated according to different groups and work status.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals, General , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 633-640, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the psychological status of medical staff in the epidemic period of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and to analyze its influential factors. METHODS: A total of 373 medical staff from Xiangya Hospital and the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University were enrolled for this study. The General Sociological Data Questionnaire, Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90), and self-designed public opinion response questionnaire were used to assess general sociological data, mental health scores, and ability to respond to COVID-19 related public opinion information of medical staff. The mental health scores of medical staff with different general sociological data and public opinion information coping abilities were compared. Influential factors of mental health were analyzed. RESULTS: The average score of 10 factors in SCL-90 of 373 medical staff was less than 2 points. 14.21% medical staff had one or more factor scores more than two points, including 11.26% with terror symptoms, 7.77% with compulsive symptoms, and 5.63% with anxiety. The main sources of COVID-19 information for medical staff included WeChat, microblog, Jinri toutiao, TV and radio. 66.22% medical staff regularly verified information about COVID-19 through official websites or formal channels. A great deal of COVID-19 information in WeChat could make medical staff nervous (34.05%), anxious (30.29%), and insecure (29.22%). 68.63% medical staff sometimes were worried about getting infected because they knew information about COVID-19. Different departments of medical staff, getting cough or having a fever recently, and the degree of fear of infection had an impact on the SCL-90 score of medical staff, the differences were all statistically significant (all P<0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the impact of COVID-19 information on their life in WeChat, getting cough or having a fever recently, insomnia-early caused by COVID-19 information in WeChat, different departments, and the degree of fear of infection COVID-19 were the influential factors for the mental health of medical staff (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the epidemic of COVID-19, medical staff suffered from psychological problems to various degrees. It is necessary to establish a psychological assistance platform and guide the direction of public opinion correctly to promote the mental health of medical staff.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Status , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , China , Compulsive Behavior , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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