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1.
Gac Med Mex ; 156(3): 246-248, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692409

ABSTRACT

Except for pregnant women, the management of critically ill patients with COVID-19 during the pandemic includes the standard procedures that are used for any patient that requires to be attended to at the intensive care unit, as well as limited administration of crystalloid solutions, orotracheal intubation, invasive mechanical ventilation in the event of patient clinical deterioration, and muscle relaxants continuous infusion only if necessary. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and high-flow oxygen therapy are not recommended due to the generation of aerosol (associated with risk of viral spread among health personnel), and neither is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or the use of steroids. So far, there is no specific antiviral treatment for patients with COVID-19, and neither are there results of controlled trials supporting the use of any.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Illness , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
4.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e925047, 2020 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689085

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and compare these parameters in an elderly group with those in a younger group. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective, single-center observational study included 69 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from a tertiary hospital in Wuhan, China, between January 14, 2020, and February 26, 2020. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as treatments, complications, and outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) and younger patients (aged <60 years). Patients were followed until March 19, 2020. RESULTS Elderly patients had more complications than younger patients, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; 9/25, 36% vs. 5/44, 11.4%) and cardiac injury (7/25, 28% vs. 1/44, 2.3%), and they were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (6/25, 24% vs. 2/44, 4.5%). As of March 19, 2020, 60/69 (87%) of the patients had been discharged, 6/69 (8.7%) had died, and 3/69 (4.3%) remained in the hospital. Of those who were discharged or died, the median duration of hospitalization was 13.5 days (interquartile range, 10-18 days). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients with confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to develop ARDS and cardiac injury than younger patients and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring and respiratory support, cardiac monitoring and supportive care should be a focus in elderly patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Diseases/etiology , Humans , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Palliative Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
6.
J Infect Dis ; 221(11): 1762-1769, 2020 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pneumonia (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan and has since rapidly spread throughout China. We aimed to clarify the characteristics and clinical significance of peripheral lymphocyte subset alteration in COVID-19. METHODS: The levels of peripheral lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry in 60 hospitalized COVID-19 patients before and after treatment, and their association with clinical characteristics and treatment efficacy was analyzed. RESULTS: Total lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK) cells decreased in COVID-19 patients, and severe cases had a lower level than mild cases. The subsets showed a significant association with inflammatory status in COVID-19, especially CD8+ T cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratio. After treatment, 37 patients (67%) showed clinical response, with an increase in CD8+ T cells and B cells. No significant change in any subset was detected in nonresponsive cases. In multivariate analysis, posttreatment decrease in CD8+ T cells and B cells and increase in CD4+/CD8+ ratio were indicated as independent predictors of poor efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: Peripheral lymphocyte subset alteration was associated with clinical characteristics and treatment efficacy of COVID-19. CD8+ T cells tended to be an independent predictor for COVID-19 severity and treatment efficacy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Lymphocyte Subsets , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia/etiology , Pneumonia/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Pneumonia/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Contin Educ Health Prof ; 40(2): 74-75, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-687515

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID 19) pandemic has necessitated changes in health care delivery, including increases in delivery of care through asynchronous or virtual means, and deployment of clinicians in different teams and settings. Physical distancing and redeployment of clinicians has also necessitated changes in health care continuing professional development (CPD). Health care delivery and CPD is unlikely to fully return (in the near term, if at all) to pre-pandemic status. The authors raise questions and opportunities for development and provision of CPD during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Clinical Competence , Humans , Telemedicine
9.
Turk J Med Sci ; 50(SI-1): 585-591, 2020 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686209

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) stands out as the major pandemic that we have experienced in the last century. As it affects every social structure, it brought the importance of intensive care support once again to the agenda of healthcare system after causing severe acute respiratory syndrome. The precautions to be taken against this virus, where our knowledge is extremely small, intensive care units take an indispensable place in pandemic planning. In this review, we aimed to emphasize the crucial points regarding intensive care management of COVID-19 patients, which we have written not only for intensivists but also for all healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Respiratory Therapy , Sepsis/complications , Shock/complications
10.
Immunol Cell Biol ; 98(4): 287-304, 2020 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685605

ABSTRACT

The human fragment crystallizable (Fc)γ receptor (R) interacts with antigen-complexed immunoglobulin (Ig)G ligands to both activate and modulate a powerful network of inflammatory host-protective effector functions that are key to the normal physiology of immune resistance to pathogens. More than 100 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are approved or in late stage clinical trials, many of which harness the potent FcγR-mediated effector systems to varying degrees. This is most evident for antibodies targeting cancer cells inducing antibody-dependent killing or phagocytosis but is also true to some degree for the mAbs that neutralize or remove small macromolecules such as cytokines or other Igs. The use of mAb therapeutics has also revealed a "scaffolding" role for FcγR which, in different contexts, may either underpin the therapeutic mAb action such as immune agonism or trigger catastrophic adverse effects. The still unmet therapeutic need in many cancers, inflammatory diseases or emerging infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) requires increased effort on the development of improved and novel mAbs. A more mature appreciation of the immunobiology of individual FcγR function and the complexity of the relationships between FcγRs and antibodies is fueling efforts to develop more potent "next-gen" therapeutic antibodies. Such development strategies now include focused glycan or protein engineering of the Fc to increase affinity and/or tailor specificity for selective engagement of individual activating FcγRs or the inhibitory FcγRIIb or alternatively, for the ablation of FcγR interaction altogether. This review touches on recent aspects of FcγR and IgG immunobiology and its relationship with the present and future actions of therapeutic mAbs.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , Immunotherapy , Receptors, IgG/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy
11.
Acta Biomed ; 91(2): 172-176, 2020 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685518

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Its outbreak in many states of the world, forced the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare a pandemic. Currently, COVID-19 has infected 1 991 562 patients causing 130 885 deaths globally as of 16 April 2020. The aim of this review is to underline the epidemiological, clinical and management characteristics in children affected by COVID-19. METHODS: We searched Pubmed, from January to April 2020, for the following search terms: "COVID-19", "children", "SARS-COV2", "complications", "epidemiology", "clinical features", focusing our attention mostly on epidemiology and symptoms of COVID-19 in children. RESULTS: Usually, infants and children present milder symptoms of the disease with a better outcome than adults. Consequently, children may be considered an infection reservoir that may play a role as spreader of the infection in community.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Child , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Radiography, Thoracic , Severity of Illness Index , Ultrasonography
12.
Crit Care Med ; 48(6): e440-e469, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of a rapidly spreading illness, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), affecting thousands of people around the world. Urgent guidance for clinicians caring for the sickest of these patients is needed. METHODS: We formed a panel of 36 experts from 12 countries. All panel members completed the World Health Organization conflict of interest disclosure form. The panel proposed 53 questions that are relevant to the management of COVID-19 in the ICU. We searched the literature for direct and indirect evidence on the management of COVID-19 in critically ill patients in the ICU. We identified relevant and recent systematic reviews on most questions relating to supportive care. We assessed the certainty in the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, then generated recommendations based on the balance between benefit and harm, resource and cost implications, equity, and feasibility. Recommendations were either strong or weak, or in the form of best practice recommendations. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel issued 54 statements, of which four are best practice statements, nine are strong recommendations, and 35 are weak recommendations. No recommendation was provided for six questions. The topics were: 1) infection control, 2) laboratory diagnosis and specimens, 3) hemodynamic support, 4) ventilatory support, and 5) COVID-19 therapy. CONCLUSION: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel issued several recommendations to help support healthcare workers caring for critically ill ICU patients with COVID-19. When available, we will provide new evidence in further releases of these guidelines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Betacoronavirus , Critical Illness , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Intensive Care Units/standards , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/standards , Shock/therapy
13.
Arch Cardiol Mex ; 90(Supl): 77-83, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685038

ABSTRACT

A review is carried out to examine the risk of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus in the context of general morbidity and mortality and related to infection by SARS-CoV-2. Likewise, the general recommendations for food and the prevention of comorbidities that most these patients suffer most frequently are also studied. Finally, a review of the pharmacological recommendations on both oral and parenteral treatment in the outpatient, in hospitalization and in critical states infected with SARS-CoV-2 is made.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Ambulatory Care/methods , Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Risk Factors
15.
Rev. Hosp. Ital. B. Aires (2004) ; 40(2): 63-75, jun. 2020. graf, ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-679089

ABSTRACT

El objetivo de este artículo es proporcionar una guía que sirva para la interpretación y seguimiento de los esfuerzos que se están desarrollando en todo el mundo con el objetivo de obtener una vacuna que pueda generar inmunidad contra el nuevo coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 de 2019, el agente causante de la enfermedad por coronavirus denominada COVID-19. Cinco meses después de haber sido detectada la enfermedad, ya hay 102 vacunas en distintos estadios de desarrollo, registradas por la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS), correspondientes a 8 plataformas vacunales con diferentes estrategias, y todos los días aparecen nuevas. Esto representará un enorme desafío de organismos internacionales, para la evaluación, comparación y selección de aquellas que cumplan con los criterios regulatorios indispensables de seguridad y eficacia y que, por otro lado, puedan ser producidas en cantidades suficientes para abastecer la demanda mundial. (AU)


The objective of this article is to provide a guide to help the interpretation and monitoring the efforts that are being carried out worldwide to obtain a vaccine that will be able to generate immunity against the new 2019 SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, the viral agent causes the disease named COVID-19. Five months after the disease was detected, there are already 102 vaccines at different stages of development, registered by World Health Organization (WHO), corresponding to 8 vaccination platforms base on different strategies, and every day new ones appear. This will represent a huge challenge for international organizations, to evaluate, compare and selects those that will meet the essential regulatory criteria of safety and efficacy and that, would be able to be produced in enough quantities to supply the worldwide demand. Key words: SARS-Cov-2 vaccine, vaccine platform, COVID-19 strategy, attenuated virus, viral vector, viral proteins, viral DNA, viral RNA, nucleic acids, viral like particles, WHO. (AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , SARS Virus/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , DNA/therapeutic use , RNA/therapeutic use , Vaccines/therapeutic use , Nucleic Acids/therapeutic use , Protein S/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , SARS Virus/physiology , SARS Virus/genetics , Disease Vectors
16.
Rev Gastroenterol Mex ; 85(3): 282-287, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is an increasing number of reports on the presentation of gastrointestinal symptoms in cases of COVID-19. AIM: To review the studies reporting gastrointestinal symptoms in COVID-19. RESULTS: Fifteen articles (2,800 patients) were identified. Gastrointestinal symptom frequency varied from 3.0% to 39.6% and included diarrhea (7.5%), náusea (4.5%), anorexia (4.4%), vomiting (1.3%), abdominal pain (0.5%), and belching/reflux (0.3%). Those symptoms can be the first manifestation of COVID-19, but whether they reflect a better or worse prognosis, is controversial. The potential relation of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor in the digestive tract as an entry route for the virus is discussed. CONCLUSION: Gastrointestinal symptoms may be common in COVID-19, in some cases appearing as the first manifestation, even before fever and respiratory symptoms. Therefore, clinicians and gastroenterologists must be aware of those atypical cases during the current pandemic, as well as of the fecal-oral route and corresponding preventive measures.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Gastroenterologists , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy
17.
Rev Gastroenterol Mex ; 85(3): 288-294, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680707

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: After the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic, the number of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) has increased exponentially, and gastroenterologists and other specialists most likely will be involved in the care of those patients. AIM: To evaluate the knowledge Latin American gastroenterologists and endoscopists (staff physicians and residents) have about the characteristics of COVID-19, as well as the prevention measures to be taken during endoscopic procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study that included gastroenterologists and endoscopists from 9 Latin American countries. An electronic questionnaire was applied that was designed to evaluate the knowledge of symptoms, risk groups for severe disease, prevention measures, and the reprocessing of endoscopes utilized in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: Information was obtained from 133 physicians. Ninety-five percent of them correctly identified the most frequent symptoms of the virus, and 60% identified the 3 risk groups for severe disease. Sixty-six percent of those surveyed did not consider it necessary to use standard precautions during endoscopic procedures, and 30% did not consider contact precautions necessary. Forty-eight percent of the participants surveyed were not familiar with the protocol for reprocessing the endoscopes utilized in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The majority of the gastroenterologists and endoscopists surveyed were familiar with the signs and symptoms of COVID-19 and the populations at risk for complications. There was a lack of knowledge about prevention measures (during clinical care and endoscopic procedures) and the reprocessing of endoscopic equipment by 70% and 48%, respectively, of those surveyed. Dissemination and teaching strategies that increase the knowledge of specific biosafety measures must be carried out.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastroenterologists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endoscopes , Humans , Latin America , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Risk Factors , Sterilization , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 21(7): 951-953, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680411

ABSTRACT

Residents of congregate care settings have been severely impacted by the current Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In this report, we describe the methods our home-based primary care practice has developed to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in assisted living facilities (ALFs) and we present an initial evaluation of this innovation. Shortly after the first COVID-19 case was reported in the United States, our organization assembled an outbreak committee, designed to support the 1794 ALF residents and the 101 communities in which they reside. The committee led the development and deployment of a comprehensive COVID-19 prevention and suppression strategy. The average age of the cohort was 83 ± 11 years, and 74% were female. Seven individuals (0.4% of census) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The positive individuals were located in 3 ALFs, representing 3% of our total number of ALFs. There has been 1 death. Home-based primary care-led outbreak mitigation may be an enabler to suppress COVID-19 in ALFs.


Subject(s)
Assisted Living Facilities/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Primary Health Care/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Program Evaluation , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , United States
19.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 468, 2020 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac injury is now a common complication of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but it remains unclear whether cardiac injury-related biomarkers can be independent predictors of mortality and severe disease development or intensive care unit (ICU) admission. METHODS: Two investigators searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang, MedRxiv, and ChinaXiv databases for articles published through March 30, 2020. Retrospective studies assessing the relationship between the prognosis of COVID-19 patients and levels of troponin I (TnI) and other cardiac injury biomarkers (creatine kinase [CK], CK myocardial band [CK-MB], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], and interleukin-6 [IL-6]) were included. The data were extracted independently by two investigators. RESULTS: The analysis included 23 studies with 4631 total individuals. The proportions of severe disease, ICU admission, or death among patients with non-elevated TnI (or troponin T [TnT]), and those with elevated TnI (or TnT) were 12.0% and 64.5%, 11.8% and 56.0%, and 8.2% and. 59.3%, respectively. Patients with elevated TnI levels had significantly higher risks of severe disease, ICU admission, and death (RR 5.57, 95% CI 3.04 to 10.22, P < 0.001; RR 6.20, 95% CI 2.52 to 15.29, P < 0.001; RR 5.64, 95% CI 2.69 to 11.83, P < 0.001). Patients with an elevated CK level were at significantly increased risk of severe disease or ICU admission (RR 1.98, 95% CI 1.50 to 2.61, P < 0.001). Patients with elevated CK-MB levels were at a higher risk of developing severe disease or requiring ICU admission (RR 3.24, 95% CI 1.66 to 6.34, P = 0.001). Patients with newly occurring arrhythmias were at higher risk of developing severe disease or requiring ICU admission (RR 13.09, 95% CI 7.00 to 24.47, P < 0.001). An elevated IL-6 level was associated with a higher risk of developing severe disease, requiring ICU admission, or death. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients with elevated TnI levels are at significantly higher risk of severe disease, ICU admission, and death. Elevated CK, CK-MB, LDH, and IL-6 levels and emerging arrhythmia are associated with the development of severe disease and need for ICU admission, and the mortality is significantly higher in patients with elevated LDH and IL-6 levels.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Heart Injuries/etiology , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Biomarkers/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Injuries/blood , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Troponin I/blood
20.
Anesth Analg ; 131(1): 16-23, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-677481

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported in China in December 2019. Since then, it has spread across the world to become one of the most serious life-threatening pandemics since the influenza pandemic of 1918. This review article will focus on the specific risks and nuanced considerations of COVID-19 in the cancer patient. Important perioperative management recommendations during this outbreak are emphasized, in addition to discussion of current treatment techniques and strategies available in the battle against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Management
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