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1.
J Immunol ; 208(2): 321-327, 2022 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708204

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have demonstrated that 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) exerted key roles in various pulmonary diseases, but the evidence for its role in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) was lacking. The goal of this research was to evaluate the correlations of serum 8-OHdG with the severity and prognosis among patients with CAP through a prospective cohort study. A total of 239 patients with CAP and 239 healthy participants were enrolled. Fasting blood samples were collected. 8-OHdG and inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA. On admission, serum 8-OHdG was significantly increased in patients with CAP compared with control subjects. Besides, serum 8-OHdG was incrementally increased in line with CAP severity scores. Pearson correlative analysis found that serum 8-OHdG was correlated with clinical characteristics and inflammatory cytokines in patients with CAP. Linear and logistic regression analysis showed that serum 8-OHdG was positively associated with CAP severity scores. Furthermore, the prognostic outcomes were tracked. Higher serum 8-OHdG on admission increased the risks for intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, vasoactive agent usage, death, and longer hospital stay among patients with CAP. Serum 8-OHdG combination with confusion, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age ≥65 y or pneumonia severity index had stronger predictive powers for death than single 8-OHdG, CAP severity scores, or several inflammatory cytokines in patients with CAP. These results indicated that serum 8-OHdG is positively associated with the severity and poor prognosis in patients with CAP, demonstrating that 8-OHdG may be involved in the pathophysiology process of CAP.


Subject(s)
8-Hydroxy-2'-Deoxyguanosine/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/pathology , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Cytokines/blood , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pneumonia/pathology , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data
2.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263215, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether high D-dimer level before treatment has any impact on poor outcomes in patients with community-associated pneumonia (CAP) remains unclear. Therefore, we conducted the first meta-analysis focusing specifically on prognostic value of high D-dimer level before treatment in CAP patients. METHODS: Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and World Health Organization clinical trials registry center were searched up to the end of March 2021. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) and observational studies were included to demonstrate the association between the level of D-dimer and clinical outcomes. Data were extracted using an adaptation of the Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modeling Studies (CHARMS-PF). When feasible, meta-analysis using random-effects models was performed. Risk of bias and level of evidence were assessed with the Quality in Prognosis Studies tool and an adaptation of Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Data were analyzed using STATA 14.0 to complete meta and network analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Besides d-dimer levels in CAP patients with poor outcomes, we also analyzed proportion of patients with or without poor outcomes correctly classified by the d-dimer levels as being at high or low risk. The poor outcome includes severe CAP, death, pulmonary embolism (PE) and invasive mechanical ventilators. RESULTS: 32 studies with a total of 9,593 patients were eventually included. Pooled effect size (ES) suggested that d-dimer level was significantly higher in severe CAP patients than non-severe CAP patients with great heterogeneity (SMD = 1.21 95%CI 0.87-1.56, I2 = 86.8% p = 0.000). D-dimer level was significantly elevated in non-survivors compared to survivors with CAP (SMD = 1.22 95%CI 0.67-1.77, I2 = 85.1% p = 0.000). Prognostic value of d-dimer for pulmonary embolism (PE) was proved by hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curve (HSROC) with good summary sensitivity (0.74, 95%CI, 0.50-0.89) and summary specificity (0.82, 95%CI, 0.41-0.97). Network meta-analysis suggested that there was a significant elevation of d-dimer levels in CAP patients with poor outcome than general CAP patients but d-dimer levels weren't significantly different among poor outcomes. CONCLUSION: The prognostic ability of d-dimer among patients with CAP appeared to be good at correctly identifying high-risk populations of poor outcomes, suggesting potential for clinical utility in patients with CAP.


Subject(s)
Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/mortality , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Network Meta-Analysis , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Community-Acquired Infections/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/complications , Prognosis , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , Young Adult
3.
Dis Markers ; 2022: 4713045, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673529

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is abundant in serum and has been implicated in several processes including blood coagulation and immune response. This prospective study is aimed at exploring HRG as a biomarker in patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods: A total of 160 patients (73 severe CAP, 57 nonsevere CAP), and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in 2019. Demographic and clinical data were recorded for all patients. Serum HRG concentration was measured upon admission using ELISA. Results: HRG levels were significantly lower in severe CAP patients compared with other groups, regardless of etiology, and were negatively correlated with serum interleukin-6 and disease severity index scores. Combination of CURB-65, PSI, and APACHE II scores with HRG values significantly improved the accuracy of predicting 30-day mortality in these patients. Cox regression analysis showed that HRG could serve as an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality. Notably, patients with HRG ≤ 16.92 µg/mL had significantly lower cumulative survival than those with HRG > 16.92 µg/mL. Conclusion: Serum HRG levels are lower in patients with severe CAP and are negatively correlated with disease severity scores. Measurement of HRG upon admission can provide valuable prognostic information for patients with CAP.


Subject(s)
Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/mortality , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/mortality , Proteins/analysis , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Survival Rate
4.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(2): 102407, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Glycemic control in critical illness has been linked to outcomes. We sought to investigate if COVID pneumonia was causing disrupted glycemic control compared to historically similar diseases. METHODS: At Intermountain Healthcare, a 23-hospital healthcare system in the intermountain west, we performed a multicenter, retrospective cohort observational study. We compared 13,268 hospitalized patients with COVID pneumonia to 6673 patients with non -COVID-pneumonia. RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 were younger had fewer comorbidities, had lower mortality and greater length of hospital stay. Our regression models demonstrated that daily insulin dose, indexed for weight, was associated with COVID-19, age, diabetic status, HgbA1c, admission SOFA, ICU length of stay and receipt of corticosteroids. There was significant interaction between a diagnosis of diabetes and having COVID-19. Time in range for our IV insulin protocol was not correlated with having COVID after adjustment. It was correlated with ICU length of stay, diabetic control (HgbA1C) and prior history of diabetes. Among patients with subcutaneous (SQ) insulin only percent of glucose checks in range was correlated with diabetic status, having Covid-19, HgbA1c, total steroids given and Elixhauser comorbidity score even when controlled for other factors. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who receive insulin for glycemic control require both more SQ and IV insulin than the non-COVID-19 pneumonia counterparts. Patients with COVID-19 who received SQ insulin only had a lower percent of glucose checks in range.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Glycemic Control/statistics & numerical data , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Glycemic Control/methods , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Insulin/administration & dosage , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Retrospective Studies
5.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259910, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical observations have shown that there is a relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral blood; however, knowledge about the time course of the changes in atypical lymphocytes and the association with the clinical course of COVID-19 is limited. OBJECTIVE: Our purposes were to investigate the dynamics of atypical lymphocytes in COVID-19 patients and to estimate their clinical significance for diagnosis and monitoring disease course. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively identified 98 inpatients in a general ward at Kashiwa Municipal Hospital from May 1st, 2020, to October 31st, 2020. We extracted data on patient demographics, symptoms, comorbidities, blood test results, radiographic findings, treatment after admission and clinical course. We compared clinical findings between patients with and without atypical lymphocytes, investigated the behavior of atypical lymphocytes throughout the clinical course of COVID-19, and determined the relationships among the development of pneumonia, the use of supplemental oxygen and the presence of atypical lymphocytes. RESULTS: Patients with atypical lymphocytes had a significantly higher prevalence of pneumonia (80.4% vs. 42.6%, p < 0.0001) and the use of supplemental oxygen (25.5% vs. 4.3%, p = 0.0042). The median time to the appearance of atypical lymphocytes after disease onset was eight days, and atypical lymphocytes were observed in 16/98 (16.3%) patients at the first visit. Atypical lymphocytes appeared after the confirmation of lung infiltrates in 31/41 (75.6%) patients. Of the 13 oxygen-treated patients with atypical lymphocytes, approximately two-thirds had a stable or improved clinical course after the appearance of atypical lymphocytes. CONCLUSION: Atypical lymphocytes frequently appeared in the peripheral blood of COVID-19 patients one week after disease onset. Patients with atypical lymphocytes were more likely to have pneumonia and to need supplemental oxygen; however, two-thirds of them showed clinical improvement after the appearance of atypical lymphocytes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Leukocyte Disorders/diagnosis , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Disorders/complications , Leukocyte Disorders/epidemiology , Leukocyte Disorders/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e23390, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574113

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial symptoms of patients with COVID-19 are very much like those of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP); it is difficult to distinguish COVID-19 from CAP with clinical symptoms and imaging examination. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to construct an effective model for the early identification of COVID-19 that would also distinguish it from CAP. METHODS: The clinical laboratory indicators (CLIs) of 61 COVID-19 patients and 60 CAP patients were analyzed retrospectively. Random combinations of various CLIs (ie, CLI combinations) were utilized to establish COVID-19 versus CAP classifiers with machine learning algorithms, including random forest classifier (RFC), logistic regression classifier, and gradient boosting classifier (GBC). The performance of the classifiers was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and recall rate in COVID-19 prediction using the test data set. RESULTS: The classifiers that were constructed with three algorithms from 43 CLI combinations showed high performance (recall rate >0.9 and AUROC >0.85) in COVID-19 prediction for the test data set. Among the high-performance classifiers, several CLIs showed a high usage rate; these included procalcitonin (PCT), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), uric acid, albumin, albumin to globulin ratio (AGR), neutrophil count, red blood cell (RBC) count, monocyte count, basophil count, and white blood cell (WBC) count. They also had high feature importance except for basophil count. The feature combination (FC) of PCT, AGR, uric acid, WBC count, neutrophil count, basophil count, RBC count, and MCHC was the representative one among the nine FCs used to construct the classifiers with an AUROC equal to 1.0 when using the RFC or GBC algorithms. Replacing any CLI in these FCs would lead to a significant reduction in the performance of the classifiers that were built with them. CONCLUSIONS: The classifiers constructed with only a few specific CLIs could efficiently distinguish COVID-19 from CAP, which could help clinicians perform early isolation and centralized management of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Machine Learning , Pneumonia/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Female , Humans , Laboratories , Leukocyte Count , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Procalcitonin/blood , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies
7.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(5): 2274-2284, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566690

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: COVID-19 patients have a wide spectrum of disease severity. Several biomarkers were evaluated as predictors for progression towards severe disease. IL-21 is a member of common γ-chain cytokine family and creates some specific effects during programming and maintenance of antiviral immunity. We aimed to assess IL-21 as a biomarker for diagnosis and outcome prediction in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Materials and methods: Patients with a preliminary diagnosis of COVID-19 and pneumonia other than COVID-19 admitted to a tertiary care hospital were included consecutively in this comparative study. Results: The study population consisted of 51 patients with COVID-19 and 11 patients with non-COVID-19 pneumonia. Serum IL-21 concentration was markedly higher, and serum CRP concentration was significantly lower in COVID-19 patients compared to non-COVID-19 pneumonia patients. Within COVID-19 patients, 10 patients showed radiological and clinical progression. Patients with clinical worsening had lower lymphocyte count and haemoglobin. In addition to that, deteriorating patients had higher urea, LDH levels, and elevated concentration of both IL-6 and IL-21. The cut-off value of 106 ng/L for IL-21 has 80.0% sensitivity, %60.9 specificity for discriminating patients with clinical worsening. Multivariable analysis performed to define risk factors for disease progression identified IL-6 and IL-21 as independent predictors. Odds ratio for serum IL-6 concentrations ≥ 3.2 pg/mL was 8.07 (95% CI: 1.37-47.50, p = 0.04) and odds ratio for serum IL-21 concentrations ≥ 106 ng/L was 6.24 (95% CI: 1.04 ­ 37.3, p = 0.02). Conclusion: We identified specific differences in serum IL-21 between COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 pneumonia patients. Serum IL-21 measurement has promising predictive value for disease progression in COVID-19 patients. High serum IL-6 and IL-21 levels obtained upon admission are independent risk factors for clinical worsening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Interleukins/blood , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Prognosis
8.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(11): 3227-3235, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461718

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: It is known that the highest COVID-19 mortality rates are among patients who develop severe COVID-19 pneumonia. However, despite the high sensitivity of chest CT scans for diagnosing COVID-19 in a screening population, the appearance of a chest CT is thought to have low diagnostic specificity. The aim of this retrospective case-control study is based on evaluation of clinical and radiological characteristics in patients with COVID-19 (n = 41) and no-COVID-19 interstitial pneumonia (n = 48) with mild-to-moderate symptoms. METHODS AND RESULTS: To this purpose we compared radiological, clinical, biochemical, inflammatory, and metabolic characteristics, as well as clinical outcomes, between the two groups. Notably, we found similar radiological severity of pneumonia, which we quantified using a disease score based on a high-resolution computed tomography scan (COVID-19 = 18.6 ± 14.5 vs n-COVID-19 = 23.2 ± 15.2, p = 0.289), and comparable biochemical and inflammatory characteristics. However, among patients without diabetes, we observed that COVID-19 patients had significantly higher levels of HbA1c than n-COVID-19 patients (COVID-19 = 41.5 ± 2.6 vs n-COVID-19 = 38.4 ± 5.1, p = 0.012). After adjusting for age, sex, and BMI, we found that HbA1c levels were significantly associated with the risk of COVID-19 pneumonia (odds ratio = 1.234 [95%CI = 1.051-1.449], p = 0.010). CONCLUSIONS: In this retrospective case-control study, we found similar radiological and clinical characteristics in patients with COVID-19 and n-COVID-19 pneumonia with mild-to-moderate symptoms. However, among patients without diabetes HbA1c levels were higher in COVID-19 patients than in no-COVID-19 individuals. Future studies should assess whether reducing transient hyperglycemia in individuals without overt diabetes may lower the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , Case-Control Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
9.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444117

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells present in virtually all tissues; they have a potent self-renewal capacity and can differentiate into multiple cell types. They also affect the ambient tissue by the paracrine secretion of numerous factors in vivo, including the induction of other stem cells' differentiation. In vitro, the culture media supernatant is named secretome and contains soluble molecules and extracellular vesicles that retain potent biological function in tissue regeneration. MSCs are considered safe for human treatment; their use does not involve ethical issues, as embryonic stem cells do not require genetic manipulation as induced pluripotent stem cells, and after intravenous injection, they are mainly found in the lugs. Therefore, these cells are currently being tested in various preclinical and clinical trials for several diseases, including COVID-19. Several affected COVID-19 patients develop induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) associated with an uncontrolled inflammatory response. This condition causes extensive damage to the lungs and may leave serious post-COVID-19 sequelae. As the disease may cause systemic alterations, such as thromboembolism and compromised renal and cardiac function, the intravenous injection of MSCs may be a therapeutic alternative against multiple pathological manifestations. In this work, we reviewed the literature about MSCs biology, focusing on their function in pulmonary regeneration and their use in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Lung/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Regeneration/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Differentiation , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Culture Media , Extracellular Vesicles , Humans , Inflammation , Mice , Mice, SCID , Phenotype , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/blood , Thromboembolism/immunology , Thromboembolism/therapy
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 327, 2021 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173614

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies found that S100A9 may involve in the pathophysiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the role of S100A9 was unclear in the CAP. The goal was to explore the correlations of serum S100A9 with the severity and prognosis of CAP patients based on a prospective cohort study. METHODS: A total of 220 CAP patients and 110 control subjects were recruited. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Serum S100A9 and inflammatory cytokines were measured. RESULTS: Serum S100A9 was elevated in CAP patients on admission. Serum S100A9 was gradually elevated parallelly with CAP severity scores. Additionally, inflammatory cytokines were increased and blood routine parameters were changed in CAP patients compared with control subjects. Correlation analysis found that serum S100A9 was positively associated with CAP severity scores, blood routine parameters (WBC, NLR and MON) and inflammatory cytokines. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that there were positive associations between serum S100A9 and CAP severity scores. Besides, the prognosis of CAP was tracked. Serum higher S100A9 on the early stage elevated the death of risk and hospital stay among CAP patients. CONCLUSION: Serum S100A9 is positively correlated with the severity of CAP. On admission, serum higher S100A9 elevates the risk of death and hospital stay in CAP patients, suggesting that S100A9 may exert a certain role in the pathophysiology of CAP and regard as a serum diagnostic and managing biomarker for CAP.


Subject(s)
Calgranulin B/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Pneumonia/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Cohort Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
11.
J Immunol Res ; 2021: 6657894, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314178

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 caused large outbreaks of COVID-19 worldwide. COVID-19 resembles community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Our aim was to identify lymphocyte subpopulations to distinguish between COVID-19 and CAP. METHODS: We compared the peripheral blood lymphocytes and their subsets in 296 patients with COVID-19 and 130 patients with CAP. Parameters for independent prediction of COVID-19 were calculated by logistic regression. RESULTS: The main lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3+CD4+, CD16+CD56+, and CD4+/CD8+ ratio) and cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) of COVID-19 patients were significantly different from that of CAP patients. CD16+CD56+%, CD4+/CD8+ratio, CD19+, and CD3+CD4+ were identified as predictors of COVID-19 diagnosis by logistic regression. In addition, the CD3+CD4+counts, CD3+CD8+ counts, andTNF-α are independent predictors of disease severity in patients. CONCLUSIONS: Lymphopenia is an important part of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and lymphocyte subsets and cytokines may be useful to predict the severity and clinical outcomes of the disease.


Subject(s)
CD4-CD8 Ratio , COVID-19/blood , Interferon-gamma/blood , Lymphocyte Subsets/cytology , Pneumonia/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19 Testing , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 616, 2021 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients frequently suffer from vitamin C deficiency. Previous studies showed that high doses of vitamin C administration had conflicting results on clinical outcomes in patients with severe sepsis, burns, and trauma. Because of the high incidence and morbidity/mortality with severe pneumonia, we aimed to investigate the effect of administration of high dose vitamin C in critically ill patients with severe pneumonia. METHODS: Eighty critically ill patients with pneumonia were enrolled in this randomized double-blinded clinical trial. Patients with a CURB-65 score > 3, one major criterion, or ≥ 3 minor criteria were considered as severe pneumonia. Patients were randomly assigned to intervention or placebo groups receiving standard treatment plus 60 mg/kg/day vitamin C as a continuous infusion or normal saline in the same volume correspondingly for 96 h. Serum levels of vitamin C were noted at baseline and 48 h after vitamin C administration. Duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU length of stay, PaO2/FiO2, and mortality rate were noted for all patients till the 28th day. Any complications related to the vitamin C administration were recorded. RESULTS: Duration of mechanical ventilation and vasopressor use were significantly lower in the intervention group (p: < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Baseline levels of vitamin C in both groups did not have a significant difference but its levels increased in the intervention group and decreased in the control group during the study period. Mortality rate insignificantly decreased in the intervention group (p = 0.17). Three patients showed hypotension and tachycardia during the administration of vitamin C which was self-limited with decreasing the dose of vitamin C. Our results showed that the intravenous administration of a relatively high dose of vitamin C to critically ill patients with severe pneumonia was safe and could decrease the inflammation, duration of mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use without any significant effect on mortality. TRIAL REGISTRATION: IRCT registration number: IRCT20190312043030N1, Registration date: 2019-08-26, Seied Hadi Saghaleini.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Critical Care/methods , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Ascorbic Acid/blood , Critical Illness , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Clin Pharmacol ; 61(11): 1406-1414, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241509

ABSTRACT

Glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed in inflammatory diseases and have recently experienced a boom in the treatment of COVID-19. Small studies have shown an effect of glucocorticoids on inflammatory marker levels, but definitive proof is lacking. We investigated the influence of prednisone on inflammatory biomarkers in a previous multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that compared a 7-day treatment course of 50-mg prednisone to placebo in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We compared levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), leukocyte and neutrophil count between patients with and without glucocorticoid treatment at baseline and on days 3, 5, and 7 and at discharge by Wilcoxon tests and analysis of variance. A total of 356 patient data sets in the prednisone group and 355 in the placebo group were available for analysis. Compared to placebo, use of prednisone was associated with reductions in levels of CRP on days 3, 5, and 7 (mean difference of 46%, P < .001 for each time point). For PCT, no such difference was observed. Leukocyte and neutrophil count were higher in the prednisone group at all time points (mean difference of 27% for leukocytes and 33% for neutrophils, P <.001 for all time points). We conclude that after administration of glucocorticoids in community-acquired pneumonia, patients had lower CRP levels and increased leukocyte and neutrophil count as compared to the placebo group. PCT levels were not different between treatment groups. PCT levels thus may more appropriately mirror the resolution of infection compared to more traditional inflammatory markers.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Community-Acquired Infections , Leukocyte Count/methods , Pneumonia , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Procalcitonin/blood , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , Biomarkers, Pharmacological/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/drug therapy , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Statistics, Nonparametric
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(9)2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224028

ABSTRACT

Numbers of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have increased rapidly worldwide. Plasma levels of full-length galectin-9 (FL-Gal9) and osteopontin (FL-OPN) as well as their truncated forms (Tr-Gal9, Ud-OPN, respectively), are representative inflammatory biomarkers. Here, we measured FL-Gal9, FL-OPN, Tr-Gal9, and Ud-OPN in 94 plasma samples obtained from 23 COVID-19-infected patients with mild clinical symptoms (CV), 25 COVID-19 patients associated with pneumonia (CP), and 14 patients with bacterial infection (ID). The four proteins were significantly elevated in the CP group when compared with healthy individuals. ROC analysis between the CV and CP groups showed that C-reactive protein had the highest ability to differentiate, followed by Tr-Gal9 and ferritin. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that Tr-Gal9 and Ud-OPN but not FL-Gal9 and FL-OPN, had a significant association with laboratory markers for lung function, inflammation, coagulopathy, and kidney function in CP patients. CP patients treated with tocilizumab had reduced levels of FL-Gal9, Tr-Gal9, and Ud-OPN. It was suggested that OPN is cleaved by interleukin-6-dependent proteases. These findings suggest that the cleaved forms of OPN and galectin-9 can be used to monitor the severity of pathological inflammation and the therapeutic effects of tocilizumab in CP patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Galectins/blood , Osteopontin/blood , Pneumonia/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Kidney/metabolism , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/virology , ROC Curve , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
15.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(2): 1097-1100, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084774

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess the value of inflammatory factors procalcitonin (PCT), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the early diagnosis and evaluation of novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The data of 140 patients with pneumonia in our hospital, including 70 who had COVID-19 and 70 who had community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), were statistically analyzed. The levels of PCT, IL-6, and CRP were measured and statistically analyzed to determine the differences between the two groups. The differences in the COVID-19 group were analyzed after subgrouping into the ordinary type, severe type, and critical type. RESULTS: The PCT and CRP levels in the COVID-19 group were statistically lower than those in the CAP group (p < 0.05), but IL-6 was not statistically different between the two groups (p > 0.05). Statistically significant differences existed in IL-6 and CRP when comparing the COVID-19 subgroups of the critical type, severe type, and ordinary type (p < 0.05). However, there was no clinical meaning in the evaluation of the difference in PCT levels among the three subgroups with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: PCT and CRP could be used as indicators in the differentiation between COVID-19 and CAP, but IL-6 was of little significance in the differentiation. The higher the IL-6 and CRP, the more severe the condition of COVID-19 might be.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Interleukin-6/blood , Procalcitonin/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Early Diagnosis , Humans , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/diagnosis
16.
J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev ; 41(3): 199-201, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072449

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Both inflammation and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with the risk of respiratory infections. To clarify the hypothesis that CRF attenuates the incident risk of pneumonia due to inflammation, we conducted a prospective study examining the independent and joint associations of inflammation and CRF on the risk of pneumonia in a population sample of 2041 middle-aged men. METHODS: Cardiorespiratory fitness was directly measured as peak oxygen uptake (V˙o2peak) during progressive exercise testing to volitional fatigue, and categorized into tertiles. Inflammation was defined by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Pneumonia cases were identified by internal medicine physicians using the International Classification of Diseases codes in clinical practice. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 27 yr, 432 pneumonia cases were recorded. High hsCRP and CRF were associated with a higher risk (HR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.02-1.88) and a lower risk of pneumonia (HR = 0.55; CI, 0.39-0.76) after adjusting for potential confounders, respectively. Compared with normal hsCRP-Fit, moderate to high hsCRP-Unfit had an increased risk of pneumonia (HR = 1.63; CI, 1.21-2.20), but moderate to high hsCRP-Fit was not associated with an increased risk of pneumonia (HR = 1.25; CI, 0.93-1.68). CONCLUSIONS: High CRF attenuates the increased risk of pneumonia due to inflammation. These findings have potential implications for the prevention of respiratory infection characterized by systemic inflammation, such as coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19).


Subject(s)
Cardiorespiratory Fitness/physiology , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/physiopathology , Adult , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Causality , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Exercise Test , Finland/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Inflammation/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/blood , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
17.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(4): 285-289, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066462

ABSTRACT

Patients with novel coronavirus pneumonia show increased thrombotic risk. Although hemostatic alterations have been described in novel coronavirus pneumonia patients, case-control studies of von Willebrand factor (VWF), factor VIII (FVIII), and a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motif, member 13 (ADAMTS13) are lacking. VWF, ADAMTS13, FVIII, d-dimer, C-reactive protein, and routine blood cells and chemistry were measured in 10 novel coronavirus pneumonia patients and 10 non-novel coronavirus pneumonia controls. Hemostatic factors were measured less than 48 h of hospital admission in patients without invasive ventilation. d-Dimer, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen concentrations, high in both groups, did not differ significantly in novel coronavirus pneumonia vs. non-novel coronavirus pneumonia patients. Median VWF-antigen (324 vs. 153 IU/dl, P < 0.0001), VWF-Rco (342 vs. 133 IU/dl, P < 0.001), and FVIII-activity levels (203 vs. 123 IU/dl, P < 0.0001) were significantly higher in novel coronavirus pneumonia cases vs. controls ADAMTS13-activity was normal in both groups. Coronavirus pneumonia cases vs. non-novel coronavirus pneumonia controls showed marked VWF/FVIII elevation, suggesting specific virus-induced endothelial activation causing VWF/FVIII hypersecretion, which may represent a therapeutic target in novel coronavirus pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Factor VIII/analysis , Pneumonia/blood , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombophilia/etiology , von Willebrand Factor/analysis , ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , Aged , Biomarkers , Blood Cell Count , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/virology , Thrombophilia/blood
18.
Environ Health Perspect ; 128(12): 127004, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Environmental cadmium exposure is widespread. In humans, cadmium is poorly excreted, triggers pulmonary inflammation, reduces pulmonary function, and enhances lung injury by respiratory syncytial virus. OBJECTIVES: We examined the association of cadmium burden with mortality related to influenza or pneumonia. METHODS: This prospective analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) included 7,173 and 8,678 participants ≥45 years of age enrolled in NHANES-III and NHANES 1999-2006, respectively. Associations were evaluated between cadmium and mortality from influenza or pneumonia during a median follow-up of 17.3 y (NHANES-III, based on creatinine-corrected urine cadmium) and 11.4 y (NHANES 1999-2006, based on blood cadmium). Survey-weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) comparing the mortality of individuals at the 80th vs. the 20th percentile of cadmium concentrations. RESULTS: In NHANES-III, after adjustment for sex, race/ethnicity, education, body mass index, serum cholesterol, hypertension, and NHANES phase (or cycle), the HR comparing influenza or pneumonia mortality among participants with creatinine-corrected urinary cadmium in the 80th vs. 20th percentile was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.26; p=0.002) in the population as a whole and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.43; p=0.002) among never smokers. In NHANES 1999-2006, adjusted HRs for the 80th vs. 20th percentile of blood cadmium were 1.14 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.36; p=0.15) for the overall population and 1.71 (95% CI: 0.95, 3.09; p=0.07) in never smokers. DISCUSSION: Among middle-aged and older adults in the United States, higher cadmium burdens are associated with higher mortality from influenza or pneumonia. This raises the possibility that cadmium may worsen outcomes from COVID-19 infections. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP7598.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cadmium/blood , Environmental Pollutants/blood , Influenza, Human/mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Environmental Exposure , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Nutrition Surveys , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/complications , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
19.
Cytokine ; 140: 155438, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032450

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 can develop interstitial pneumonia, requiring hospitalisation or mechanical ventilation. Increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers are associated with development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of the present study was to determine which cytokines are associated with respiratory insufficiency in patients hospitalised for COVID-19. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on 67 consecutive patients were collected between March 8 and March 30, 2020. PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P/F) was calculated at hospital admission. The following cytokines were analysed: interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1α, IL-18, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-ß, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), soluble IL-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα; CD25), IL-12ß, IL-3, interferon (IFN) α2a, monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), monocyte-chemotactic protein 3 (MCP3) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). RESULTS: P/F lower than 300 was recorded in 22 out of 67 patients (32.8%). P/F strongly correlated with IL-6 (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001), M-CSF (r = -0.63, P < 0.0001), sIL-2Rα (r = -0.54, P < 0.0001), and HGF (r = -0.53, P < 0.0001). ROC curve analyses for IL-6 (AUC 0.83, 95% CI 0.73-0.93, P < 0.0001), M-CSF (AUC 0.87, 95% CI 0.79-0.96, P < 0.0001), HGF (AUC 0.81, 95% CI 0.70-0.93, P < 0.0001), and sIL-2Rα (AUC 0.80, 95% CI, 0.69-0.90, P < 0.0001) showed that these four soluble factors were highly significant. All four soluble factors correlated with LDH, white blood cell count, neutrophil count, lymphocyte count, and CRP. CONCLUSION: IL-6, M-CSF, sIL-2Rα, and HGF are possibly involved in the main biological processes of severe COVID-19, mirroring the level of systemic hyperinflammatory state, the level of lung inflammation, and the severity of organ damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokines/blood , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Inflammation/blood , Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Pneumonia/blood , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hepatocyte Growth Factor/blood , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Interleukin-6/blood , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/complications , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
20.
J Cell Mol Med ; 24(20): 12054-12064, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-755303

ABSTRACT

Cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) are transferred in disease state including inflammatory lung diseases and are often packed into extracellular vesicles (EVs). To assess their suitability as biomarkers for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and severe secondary complications such as sepsis, we studied patients with CAP (n = 30), sepsis (n = 65) and healthy volunteers (n = 47) subdivided into a training (n = 67) and a validation (n = 75) cohort. After precipitating crude EVs from sera, associated small RNA was profiled by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and evaluated in multivariate analyses. A subset of the thereby identified biomarker candidates was validated both technically and additionally by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Differential gene expression (DGE) analysis revealed 29 differentially expressed miRNAs in CAP patients when compared to volunteers, and 25 miRNAs in patients with CAP, compared to those with sepsis. Sparse partial-least discriminant analysis separated groups based on 12 miRNAs. Three miRNAs proved as a significant biomarker signature. While expression levels of miR-1246 showed significant changes with an increase in overall disease severity from volunteers to CAP and to sepsis, miR-193a-5p and miR-542-3p differentiated patients with an infectious disease (CAP or sepsis) from volunteers. Cell-free miRNAs are potentially novel biomarkers for CAP and may help to identify patients at risk for progress to sepsis, facilitating early intervention and treatment.


Subject(s)
Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/genetics , Pneumonia/diagnosis , Pneumonia/genetics , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Circulating MicroRNA/genetics , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/complications , Reproducibility of Results , Reverse Transcription/genetics , Sepsis/genetics
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